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UB 
TURRI 




Editor -in- Chief 

Albert W. Sullivan 

Business Manager 

John J. Hehir,Jr. 

Managing Editor 

John A. Altieri 



Table of Contents 


Features .... 


26 


Sports .... 


90 


Academics . . . 


138 


Activities . . . 


190 


Seniors .... 


. 250 



of BOSTON 
COLLEGE 







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9 





Since the first expression of art, man has explained beauty 
in many ways. According to the classical mind, beauty con- 
tains a diversity of elements harmoniously yoked to effect 
an abiding unity. 

The beauty of Boston College, as described in this 1961 
Sub Turri, hopes to personify this definition. The majesty 
that is Boston College's, arrayed in the variety of colleges, 
architecture, students, faculties, programs, courses, activi- 
ties, and facilities, is crowned with the unity which is its 
goal, a Catholic Education. 




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COLLEGE OF 

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A pulsating campus, vibrant laboratories, fluo- 
rescent classrooms, and even a president's po- 
tential cabinet, smashed the unity of the ordered 
rows in our class roll-call. At one moment we 
were a steel chain . . . then came that ornate 
scroll . . . and we were but a few hundred links, 
searching for new chains to form, or to produce. 

The whole thing started with those bright yel- 
low slips. Epistemology? Logic? Who were they? 
Scripture, English and copious research. Orien- 
tation week offered us new directions. If you de- 
sired assurance in bearings, you went to the 
Guidance Office. If you sought to broaden im- 
mediate interests you read the New York Times 



and spoke with nameless companions. If there 
was still uncertainty, a moment spent in the 
solitude of prayer was helpful. 

In September 1958 . . . Question: Where did 
all the cafeteria table-hoppers go? . . . must have 
transferred to the 'Cross'. Oh yes, and still more 
Philosophy and endless facts about how Rom- 
ulus and Remus were 'thrown to the wolves' and 
thus founded Rome. That was also the time that 
everyone was carrying so many books with Har- 
vard Bookstore covers — they were half price 
there. But not all of us were welcomed to the 
Gasson Honors room, the one with the two- 
inch rug and the comfortable chairs. 



Junior year heralded the concentration on ma- 
jor fields. More History, Theology, and of 
course, Philosophy. They changed the name 
again, but it was still the same stuff. Clement 
Atlee, Barbara Ward, and Arnold Toynbee 
shook hands at the invitation of the A&S Stu- 
dent Senate, while the Humanities Series brought 
into view other faces to fit the names on our 
textbooks. Junior Week gave the boys a social 
whirl and a deficit, but Tommy Dorsey's Band, 
the Four Lads, and the Junior Show made it 
worth the lettuce'. 

Finally, we were checking the 'Sr.' block on 
those yellow slips. In ethics class that fellow on 
your right had his name in the headlines of the 
Globe sport's page, and the belletristic one be- 
hind you was taking interviews for Dear Abby. 



In these last days you had no social standing 
unless you had a key to the Lyons elevator and 
a pass to the stacks. And it wasn't until our last 
year that we learned the lights kept burning for 
the Arts and Science Night Qwl Corps. Then a 
handshake, a venerable parchment, and the Class 
of 1961, College of Arts arid Sciences enter the 
august files on the first floor of Gasson Hall. 

So we concluded, departed and splashed in 
all directions like raindrops on a bus roof. But 
we have left our mark in more ways than merely 
in a class maple. We may leave the 'quad' and 
never return, not even to chant another "For 
Boston" in the stadium or propose a toast in 
Alumni Hall. We may never see another linden 
tree or mounted eagle, but what we have seen 
and done as a class will forever remain. 




"we have left our mark' 



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Fulton Hall 



COLLEGE OF 



It was the same as climbing a mountain. Each 
step was taken with care and each plateau was 
a mark of achievement. Upon reaching the top, 
we were left on our own, either to continue with 
more difficult ascents or to stand and hold the 
little ground of our last accomplishment. Such 
was our education in the College of Business 
Administration. The plateaus numbered four, 
they were the years spent in Fulton Hall; the 
top was the day we departed from Boston Col- 
lege with diploma in hand; and the choice, only 
our future achievements can answer that. 

To briefly review our climb, many would say 
the first plateau was the hardest to reach. Loose 



footings, theological gaps, language barriers, 
economic slumps, and impressionable minds 
made the path a rigorous one, but intermittent 
rest spots such as those found in the new Alumni 
Stadium, in intramural squabbles or even in 
cafeteria kibitzing seemed to give new hope and 
incentive to move up. When we reached that 
first level, we stopped and made an evaluation 
of our first contact with the business world; for 
some it was appealing, for others it was cold 
and hard, like the rocks at the mountain base. 
But all returned to climb a little higher. 

A summer passed and we became 'wise fools'. 
New equipment was issued — slide rule, graph 



s 



sheets and a few machines down in Rm. 120. We 
found new diversions in McHugh Forum and 
Roberts Center, and applauded another team of 
climbers who won the Eastern Intercollegiate 
Hockey Championships. 

We had different guides that year. Aristotle 
informed us of logical and true footholds, Ed- 
mund Burke used some persuasive powers on 
us, and Doc Aherne sharpened our analytical 
reflexes. That was the year that some Alpine, 
uniquely named Fritz Freund, was to join the 
group, but just as uniquely faded in his own 
echo. The year concluded with one thought in 
mind, that the horizon was a more desirable 
and more definite goal. 

Junior year revealed greater dimensions. We 
spread out to approach the mountain from dif- 
ferent directions. Some chose an Economic route, 
some found Financial distribution or Industrial 
Management more expedient, and others picked 
Accounting. With the arrival of the nurses and 
our counterparts in the night school, came a 
new life to the campus. Cardinal Cushing re- 
ceived his Red Hat and the Honors Program got 
a boost from General Electric with a grant of 
$2,500. It was a trying year, but a profitable one. 
There wasn't time to stop here, the summit was 
in view. 

At last, the peak was reached. As we turned 
and looked back, we found the mountain not as 
steep as it seemed while climbing. Senior year 
came and passed. It was a year of achievement, 
of maturity, of decision. Plans for tomorrow in- 
clude further obstacles, but such thoughts as the 
College of Business Administration and 'Ever 
to Excel', gleaned through four years of study, 
remain as guides to our success. 



"guides to our success' 




'contact with the business world" 



'sharpened analytical reflexes" 





"a few machines' 



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SCHOOL OF 



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Lights were dimmed, the cue was given, and 
the curtain lifted. The opening scene revealed 
utter confusion — library tours, a talent show, 
campus tours, directions and a welcoming ad- 
dress. This was the prologue to a new hit that 
ran four years in Campion Hall. After the initial 
flare of activity, the remaining scenes progressed 
smoothly. The cast of many performed well to- 
gether, since the play itself and a congenial at- 
mosphere created an accomplishing 'esprit de 
corps'. The early highlights were Socrates and 
Montessori, the Alpha and Omega contests, 
persuasion speeches, and stacks of colorful slides. 



Act Two opened on a different note. Various 
groups were seen observing elementary and sec- 
ondary classrooms in action. With the introduc- 
tion of Philosophy and major subjects, the play- 
ers 'logically' became more serious. The intel- 
lectual elite were issued keys to the smoke-filled 
Honors room. There were two popular Bohemian 
scenes, but neither lasted very long. Bors Cove 
fell in defeat, while the SUB TURRI'S Cafe Ala 
was shut down by the powers that be. A few 
co-eds broke tradition with their frolicsome.con- 
tortions and squealing rah-rah's at the 'apple 
sauce' rally. As the curtain was about to close, 



13 



a new hero called Peter came into the limelight. 
He was Romeo, Skelton, and Plato wrapped in 
a unique package. 

Junior year provided the setting for Act Three. 
The action started with a huge mixer in McHugh 
Forum, where, instead of chanting 'Getting to 
Know You', a chorus of three hundred stags 
were pitted against nine hundred fair ladies in a 
fight for breathing space. In this act there was 
much dialogue on parallel play, the adolescent 
stage, repression and regression, but even more 
on testing enigmatic measurements and describ- 
ing them in a unit. Someone on the stage was 
wearing squeaky shoes, which proved distract- 
ing. Several performers demonstrated unmasked 
talent in the Skit Competition; however, a sym- 
bolic nursing school lifted like a lead balloon. 
The closing scene was a banquet at Common- 



wealth Country Club, where several awards were 
made including the selection of new members 
for Alpha and Omega. 

The last act was, indeed, a climactic one. The 
stage was set with all the trappings of the class- 
room. The stars were a group of student-teachers 
exerting all their abilities and talents in the art 
of teaching. Supervisors, co-operating teachers, 
principals, and many students composed the 
remaining participants. The show was guaran- 
teed long success in education circles by en- 
thusiastic reviews. Future performances impose 
greater demands on the cast but each of its 
members carry with them the necessary disci- 
pline of mind and spirit of Blessed Edmund 
Campion. This profession is manifested in a life 
of dedication and the satisfaction of reaping the 
seeds that one has sown. 



"reaping the seeds that one has sown' 




14 




'congenial atmosphere' 



'testing enigmatic measurements" 





"unmasked talent" 



15 




Remember that first introduction to the Bos- 
ton College School of Nursing, when our 'big 
sisters' wrote and warned of the many perils 
awaiting us? They welcomed us with a seemingly 
invincible challenge, but as daring and fearless 
aspirants to the profession, we accepted — if Flor- 
ence Nightingale, Elizabeth Vose and Lucy 
Drown could survive, then why couldn't we? 

As Freshmen, our first inoculations were lib- 
eral arts and basic science courses. Although the 
dosage was greater than ten cc's, we did manage 
a few extra-curricular activities such as the bi- 
weekly Sodality meetings, the warbling sessions 
with Fr. Gorman, S.J., and the few football 
games that we refused to miss. And without the 



many Student Faculty meetings, we might have 
been a lonely Freshman class, instead of an 
active and important unit in the school functions. 
After three semesters had passed and our basic 
courses were replaced by more specialized study, 
the crucial test for a nurse was at hand, "To be 
or not to be." Here our gypsy life commenced 
as we established domicile in the Early Victorian 
and residential South End. We attacked the 
wards of the Boston City Hospital so eager to 
care for our first victims. Somehow we survived 
the obstacles of 'hypos', sterile technique, im- 
patient patients, and bedpans. And after a few 
month's practical and comprehensive experience 
in nursing care, we proved to ourselves and to 



17 




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"practical . . . experience" 



our instructors that we were worthy of the 
profession's symbol, the nurse's cap. The long- 
awaited ceremony took place in St. Ignatius' 
Church, and as we received our caps we were 
told, "Your life is one of dedication, but the 
rewards are bountiful." This was a special day 
in our nursing career, one that will long remain 
in the category of fondest memories. 

As Juniors we prepared to leave our residence 
at City. The dorm was in turmoil as borrowed 
garments were returned, books and uniforms 
packed, and farewells abounded. It was a sad 
day, too, for this was the first time in two years 
that the class was separated. However, we found 
consolation in anticipating our reunion in the 
newly dedicated Cushing Hall. In small groups 
we set out for various hospitals throughout the 
state to undertake more concentrated study. 
Some of us moved to the Children's Medical 
Center for study in pediatrics, others went off 
to either Metropolitan State Hospital or the 
Institute of Living for psychiatric experience, and 
still others headed for the Rutland V.A. Hos- 
pital for long term illnesses or to St. Margaret's 
for obstetrics. The life was like that of the wan- 
dering minstrel, spending three months at each 
location and then moving on to the next. 

And finally, our itinerary closed as we com- 
pleted our Senior year on campus. But the end 
is only the beginning to a life symbolized in a 
lighted candle and a white uniform. 



'the end is only the beginning" 




18 





j PS^ J$'lr 'JIR.|H 



'Student-Faculty meetings' 




'newly dedicated Cushing Hall' 



'a lighted candle" 




1" 




Rev. Albert F. McGuinn, S.J., Professor of Chemistn 



Rev. Paul J. McManus, S.J., Assistant Professor of Modern Languages 




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20 



"... There are those who give and know not pain in 
giving, nor do they seek joy, nor give with mindfulness 
of virtue ..." 

You, Fr. Albert F. McGuinn, are the exemplar of 
this dictum. Your life is one of unselfish generosity. You 
have extended us your fatherly friendship wrought 
through belief in the goodness of all. You have bright- 
ened many lives with your rich humor mingled with 
piety and dignity. Your understanding, initiative and 
foresight serve as models of true scholarship and in- 
centive for others to follow. Your twenty-two years at 
Boston College have been an invaluable impetus to her 
growth and greatness. You are all this and much more; 
and because you have given this of yourself, we praise 
and thank you. 

To you, Father, we dedicate the 1961 SUB TURRI. 



plflife 



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". . . He is indeed wise who does not enter the house of 
his wisdom, but rather leads you to the threshold of 
your own mind ..." 

You, Father Paul J. McManus, are the exemplar of 
this dictum. Your unobstrusive dedication to the chil- 
dren of Boston College, your enduring humility and ex- 
tensive wisdom, your endearing and genuine warmth, 
your Christlike simplicity, and your seventeen years 
service to this university; for these reasons you will re- 
main a beloved and integral part of our college life, a 
cherished memory to us who thank you and say fare- 
well. 

To you, Father, we dedicate the 1961 SUB TURRI. 



21 



F 
E 



A 
T 



U 
R 



E 
S 





Multiple and varied are the 
featured social activities at Boston 
College. The victory dance, the 
night at the Pops, the prom, the 
Junior Show, the coffee break, 
the weekend date — each has 
taught us and each has served 
to modify and temper our ideas. 
The formal events and informal 
contacts have widened our 
knowledge and understanding of 
human nature. All of these 
have provided the essential 
ingredients to be utilized in our 
communal living. 



F 



E 



A 
T 



U 
R 



E 



S 





Multiple and varied are the 
featured social activities at Boston 
College. The victory dance, the 
night at the Pops, the prom, the 
Junior Show, the coffee break, 
the weekend date — each has 
taught us and each has served 
to modify and temper our ideas. 
The formal events and informal 
contacts have widened our 
knowledge and understanding of 
human nature. All of these 
have provided the essential 
ingredients to be utilized in our 
communal living. 





I 



'What do you mean another year? I just got back from Lauderdale." 



WELCOME BACK SENIOR 



"Hi Joe! How did the summer go?" "Well, I worked for 
the M.D.C. and I believe I'm the first man in the history of 
the Civil Service Department ever to sweep the entire Mass. 
Pike from one end to the other." 

"I see the room is still the same." ". . . What did you ex- 
pect, lace curtains?" 

"How are your courses?" "I don't know; that registra- 
tion line wraps around Lyons Hall three times." 

"Is the food any better this year?" "Are you kidding . . . 
anyway, you're lucky to get a seat in the caf." 






'Okay Jiminy, we can't all go to Europe for the summer." 



26 





'Yup, I think I'm going to like this room, Father.' 



"Hey Jim, got a match?" 




27 




MASS OF THE 



The academic year began with Cardinal Cushing's visit to 
Boston College to celebrate the annual "Mass of the Holy 
Ghost." The Cardinal's message sent the students forth with 
drawn pens and pencils to face the rigors of a new academic 
year. 

Our prelate then traveled to "Old Alumni Field," a site 
much cherished by the old guard. Progress reigned, how- 
ever, as the Cardinal's silver spade sunk into the hallowed 
ground to begin the new Student Union Building. 

The Cardinal completed the historic day at Boston College 
with dedication ceremonies on Dormitory Hill. The three 
new dorms were dubbed Cheverus, Fitzpatrick, and Fen- 
wick, and another link was thus completed in the program 
that would usher in a new era at Boston College. 



The Cardinal and Father Rector at the dedication of the 
new dormitories. 




Hoc est corpus meum. 



Cardinal Cushing blessing Cheverus Hall. 



28 






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HOLY GHOST, GROUND BREAKING, DEDICATION 




Mass of the Holy Ghost. 



Beginning of the new Student Union. 





The Middies and their mascot . 



"Hey, it's not Bellino this time, it's Perreault.'' 



NAVY, A NEW COACH, 




The first football weekend arrived with a double treat. 
Ernie Hefferle made his coaching debut against one of the 
toughest teams in the East and the students got their first 
glimpse of the immortal Joe Bellino. The football season 
started on a disappointing note, but the opening of the social 
season was a contrast of gaiety. Following the Navy game, 
many proceeded to the Sheraton Plaza Hotel where dancing 
to the music of Ruby Newman eliminated any gloomy feel- 
ings. This event ushered in the new social season in typical 
B.C. style. The Gold Key Society was commended for its 
excellent planning and for opening the social year in high 
fashion. 



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30 




NEW SOCIAL YEAR 



"Okay, Graham, Antonellis, Byrne, Hall 




'Pocketbooks, have we got pocketbooks!" 

The Navy "Victory" Dance. 




31 



HUDSON WEEKEND-FOR SOME 



B.C. caravans, flying maroon and gold streamers, moved 
across the Mass. Turnpike toward West Point for the first 
road game of the season. A beautiful autumn day on the 
Hudson Valley highways was only to be bettered by a restful 
night in New York City. The West Point campus surprised 
a few. "Look at those buildings, they're more Gothic than 
Chestnut Hill." "And we thought our dorm-life was bad. 
Look at those uniforms." "These people have a nine o'clock 
bed check — what an ungodly hour for anyone to turn in." 

It was loss number two for the Eagles, but our perform- 
ance was more than respectable. The Eagles impressed the 
New York fans as an Eastern powerhouse to be heard from 
in the future. 




The campus politicians gather to discuss the new year. 



"Another week and I can get into the groove of things.' 









'Huffin' and puffin' at the Point." 



'Okay, Saturday night, 8:30 at Joe King's.' 




'I got as far as Worcester, and then I had my third flat tire.'' 




33 



WHEN AUTUMN LEAVES FALL 



Although the approach of winter was near, the air was 
warm and B.C. students took advantage of the Indian Summer 
that enveloped the East coast for three weeks. The last few 
days were spent on the quadrangle lawns before the cold 
air forced retirement to the cafeteria. The V.M.I, weekend 
was successful in two veins; first, in the game which ended 
in a tie, and second, the rally and dance which combined to 
provide the enthusiastic atmosphere so necessary for student 
spirit. 







Progressive Education. 



Indian Summer study hints. 










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"Wasn't the V.M.I, rally a smashing success?" 



Figure eight at the Forum. 




"Can I help it if all the seats were taken?'' 





The confident look of victory. The final touch. 




PRE-TERRIER PREPARATIONS 



The Gold Key extravaganza. 




"Bury the Terriers" was the theme of the Boston Univer- 
sity football weekend. The rally parade on Friday com- 
menced the spirited activity. Shouts and cheers were raised 
as the student floats passed through the stadium. The 
ravenous teammates and student body were prepared for the 
kennel charge. A victory was imminent. The championship 
of Commonwealth Avenue was coming back to Boston 
College. 

At the rally which followed the parade, the vigorous girl 
cheerleaders gave impetus to the excitement of the rally. 
Members of the football team then predicted the manner 
in which B.U. would be caged on the following afternoon. 
Excitement mounted as Margo was presented to the stu- 
dents for the first time at a rally in her role as football 
mascot. Delta Sigma Pi then offered a "sneak preview" 
skit dramatizing the predictions of the football team. A 
B.U. player was critically injured on the first play and was 
removed from the Roberts Center via casket and six oblig- 
ing pall-bearers. 



Coach Hefferle's prediction. 



36 



'All right, who goes first?" 






Burial services for our Commonwealth cousins. 



Afterwards, an excursion to social gatherings. 




POST-B. U. CELEBRATION 




The "sneak preview" could not have been more realistic, 
since the Eagles literally leashed the Terriers 22-16. The 
spirit of victory was transported to the Statler Hotel by the 
class of "62". The Harry Marchard Orchestra provided the 
entertainment at the victory dance in one of the best social 
events of the football season. A B.U. victory is always sub- 
stantial reason for lowering the boom and, if you can re- 
member, it was lowered that night. 



It's embarrassing to spot an old boyfriend. 



38 




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Everyone was in good spirits. 



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"I told him to use only one dab of Brylcreem.' 





39 




WHILE THE TEAM'S AWAY 



The Eagles traveled to Miami the following weekend leav- 
ing the campus void of any athletic event. It was, no doubt, 
the providence of the A. A. that directed the team to the Sun- 
shine State rather than shovel through snow-cluttered New 
England. Entertainment was provided at a "mixer" that 
Saturday night in Campion Hall. Those who were more 
intellectually inclined stayed in their rooms or at home to 
bone up those lagging studies which seemed to escape their 
attention during the season. All in all, the weekend provided 
a needed pause from the fervor of the football season and 
gave the students a chance to store up their energy for next 
weekend's Holy Cross game. 



Five Alpha Kappa Psi pledges finally "agree" to do their social work. 



Monday morning quarterbacks explain how we could've beaten Villanova 55-6 instead of 20-6. 



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Typical Campion mixer — "Do you know John? . . . Really?" 



. . . but study. 



Saturday afternoon, no game, nothing to do, . . . 






Cheerleaders entry in the Holy Cross Float Parade. 



THE BIG 




NEEDLES 



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The Holy Cross weekend at B.C. was novel indeed. This 
year, along with the traditional float parade, there was a 
massive bonfire behind McHugh Forum at which a Crusader 
was burned in effigy. The spark of the fire ignited the already 
frantic Eagle followers. 

The rally, too, was novel. Margo, the new Boston College 
mascot, made her second formal appearance outside her 
cage. John Donovan did a fine job as master of ceremonies 
and provided an all-star lineup of celebrities. Fr. O'Connor 
was his usual humorous self; Eugene Mulcahey offered his 
satirical quips; Fr. Ferrick almost single-handedly talked 
the team into ferocity; Ernie Hefferle and John Amabile 
assured the crowd that a victory was at hand. The girl cheer- 
leaders were again met with wild cheers. The rally was surely 
one of the better "apple sauce" feasts. 



The winner, float from the Mendel Club. 



42 




Just about everyone was at the rally even Charlie Brown and Lucy. 



WEEKEND 




"They finally let me out of that darn cage.' 



Father Ferrick at his rhetorical best. 




Tomorrow they make apple sauce. 



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43 



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Saint James orchard workers view the game. 



SUB TURRI Queen, Diane Cannon. 



CRUSADERS SQUEAK BY 



Saturday afternoon, 30,000 fans gathered to cheer B.C. 
to victory. The regrettable novelty of the game was the vic- 
tory by Holy Cross. During the game a mounted Crusader 
performed equestrian saddle skills while charging up and 
down the length of the field much to the disapproval of 
Margo, who attempted to prey upon horse and rider. 

The dance on Saturday night was presented by the Sub 
Turri and was held at the Sheraton Plaza. The heartbreaking 
defeat did not seem to dampen the enjoyment of the dance. 
The only dampening that night was the lubrication at the 
Merry-Go-Round. A fitting close to a successful season. 




Everyone wants to get into the act. 



44 




BUT BEANTOWN JUMPS 




Chairman Dave Melville awards door prize, a pair of season 
hockey passes. 





The pleasant strains of the Marchard Band provided pleasant listening 
as well as dancing. 



45 



OUR LAST FALL PASSES BY 




Alumni stadium is quiet now. Seems funny that only a 
few weeks ago screaming crowds filled the benches. One 
facet of the social season is finished. Wonder how it all 
passed so quickly? Last Saturday night was the Holy Cross 
victory dance, but now there seems to be nothing. Snow 
clouds are being seen more often these days, giving rise to a 
lethargic atmosphere that hangs over the campus. For the 
senior, it's his last fall at the Heights and even the "hard 
boiled eggs" in the group occasionally feel the pangs of 
moving on. Idle sentiment? I don't think so. 








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"Snow on the ground . . . temperature 30° . . . When is 
the first hockey game? No more dances for a while . . . 
rallies all over too. Let's go down to the rink . . . fast team 
this year! Wait a minute . . . remember those studies . . . 
three weeks behind . . . Can we catch up? Oh well, I'll do it 
over the vacation." 



A MOMENTARY LULL 



"Boy, what a weekend.' 



'Don't worry boys the cards predict all A's in the future.' 





"And how did this golf ball get in there?" 



'What would you like for breakfast, boys?" 



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'Dees Mericans hass gat to go.' 




'Who put the salt in the sugar bowl?" 



49 






Silent night, Holy night. 



CHRISTMAS IS HERE! 




'Take that, you existentialist." 



"Vacation time, dormies go home . . . quiet campus. 
Shopping to be done . . . gifts wrapped . . . presented. Ski 
trips are in order. Carols fill the air . . . truly a joyous season. 
Ah yes, New Year's parties . . . everyone in gay spirits 
... 4 a.m. ... 6 a.m. ... I spent the night in a railroad 
terminal? . . . Yes, and your date left you at 1 1 :30. Oh God ! 
I missed New Year's." 

Chivalry is not dead. 



50 




\ 




A winter scene at Alumni Field. 




A well earned rest. 



DEADLINE: JANUARY 8 




'Did you check the visible index 




to locate your reference material?" 




"Three days before classes . . . Needed ... 6 term papers, 
3 book reviews . . . never make it! Over to Bapst . . . send 
down for five books . . . got five back . . . wonders will 
never cease. I was sure there were three people hired just to 
write N.A. on those slips . . . Did you check the visible 
index? . . . Overnight books are 25 cents for first three hours 
and 10 cents from then to ten o'clock . . . Your name will 
be submitted to Miss Yang for further action." 



52 




^9. 



Some study in groups 




Some in comfort , 



And some the hard way. 






Seclusion is sought. 



"Classes resume today . . . papers passed in. Exam sched- 
ules posted ... so soon? I haven't reviewed my notes for 
weeks. The theology exam will be impossible . . . start cram- 
ming. Study . . . study . . . study. I'm missing notes to six 
ethics classes ... to rely on Divine Inspiration. Four months' 
work in 2 weeks . . . ridiculous! . . . I'll never finish. One 
week left . . . good grief. . . 1 a.m. ... 2 a.m. ... 3. DIES IRE 
. . . they are upon us . . . too late now . . . sweat 'em out. Two 
weeks later . . . pressure is off . . . results known in 3 weeks 
... no news is good news." 



CRAMMING PREVAILS AS FINALS LOOM 



Library space is at a minimum. 











• 












J 





II ■•» 







3 A.M. Reviews become necessary 



Communication is confined 
to books only. 




EXAMS OVER 




"After exams, a well-earned break . . . time for a bit of 
winter recreation. Some of us make it to the mountains . . . 
nothing like a ski weekend under sunny skies in North 
Conway. What healthy living can do for a man!" 

Meanwhile, those who remain at home see President 
Kennedy take the Oath. Inauguration Day . . . Cardinal 
Cushing gives formal invocation . . . podium goes up in 
smoke . . . Robert Frost needs light . . . float parades, 
banquets, parties . . . Inaugural balls . . . President's mes- 
sage delivered . . . calls on youth of nation to sacrifice . . . 
Peace Corps . . . New frontiers. 



Some ski by travelogue only. 



Northbound Coeds supervise "minor" packing problems. 

North Conway or bust. 








A SHORT BREAK 




Early arrival provides time for honky-tonk. 



The objective — snow, tow and no broken legs. I 





. 



•'"■*' "-V 



I ^ 







WINTER WHIRL 

and a LOOK TO THE FUTURE 



School of Nursing presents the "Winter Whirl." 

New Ocean House . . . Swampscott . . . Nurses present 
their first Winter whirl ... a precedent is established. 

"What else is new on campus? . . . Seniors have taken 
on strange airs . . . Question of the hour . . . what are you 
going to do after graduation? . . . three-day waiting list in 
guidance office . . . Mr. Jenks, I have a problem! . . . 
Placement Bureau announces . .'. XYZ company will 
be on campus to interview those interested in deep sea 
diving . . . must be able to swim." 

"Don't call us, we'll call you . . . Volunteers for 
Jamaica?" 



"Oh! It's so good to be out of the hospital.' 





m. ~~ 


nps 




Wi 






■L' 'Jf~J^^ % 


B 


Rill 










1 ' J&dwBT' JbM 



i^^ 



^r i 



The Student Alumni Contact Committee. 



j., r .- 




"Graduate work in Psychology, maybe 



. or dietary control?" 




59 



WINTER CARNIVAL 
SNOWED OUT 



'Ah, come on, sure you can take an overnight.' 





"Once a month, whether I need it or not." 



"I don't see why I can't wear sneakers." 



60 




Dorm Council plans gala festivities . . . 1961 
Winter Carnival . . . long distance calls to home . . . 
"Can you come up for the weekend?" . . . Tickets 
are bought . . . everything in order. Friday morning 
. . . "Look out the window . . . it's snowing . . . 
school is cancelled." Worst storm of the year. The 
Carnival is cancelled . . . disappointment ... "I 
did so much want to see Millicent ... oh!, 'twas an 
unfortunate incident. Wait til next year." 



» II -J 




Ml ;.,7- ': 

And then, 24 inches blankets all plans 



'You and your dorm weekends.' 




61 



SENIOR DINNER DANCE 




Seniors waltz to the smooth tempo of Jessie Smith at the King Philip. 

"Are you going to the Senior Dinner-Dance? . . . No, 
that's a home game with Colby . . . No, it's the Winter 
Carnival . . . No, I don't care for fish . . . No, it's supposed 
to snow . . . furthermore, I don't have $7.50." 

Contrary to the early opposition, the ballroom at King 
Phillip was nearly filled. It did snow that night, but this 
enhanced the atmosphere. The journey home was slippery 
enough, however, only a few were "aware". 



The Queen and her Court. 



62 




y 



The grand march led by a grand group. 



A group of "celebrities?" gather during a break in the dancing. 





63 




'I beg your pardon, but I believe children should express themselves.' 





ALGERNON, for the last time . . . ! 



"Mirror, mirror, on the wall . . ." 



64 



INTERCLASS COMPETITION 



The School of Education goes Hollywood with 
their Interclass Skit Competition. Rehearsals for 
underclassmen started early in October, while 
the Seniors toiled in a last minute effort after 
student teaching. 

"We must win this year! ... if we knew the 
judges, we could play to them . . . where did they 
get the money for those costumes ... I refuse to 
be a third grader ... my makeup is peeling . . . 
last minute instructions ... the performance 
completed . . . How could the judges miss our 
symbolism? . . . consolation: a favorable reaction 
from the audience . . . they enjoyed us." 




'"What do you mean skit, . . . this is the real thing." 
"And then the big bear gobbled up the little girl." 




65 




V. 



I ~r 



■a 



» 



JJfc 



The Army on maneuvers. 



CADETS IN REVIEW 




The Boston College militia left the drill field and em- 
barked on "Operation Military Ball" over Sheraton Plaza 
at 2100 hours. 

"Shine your marksman medal ... I have no room for 
my Purple Heart . . . she should love me in dress greens . . . 
it was nice meeting you, Mrs. Wood . . . dear, watch out for 
my spit shine ... I never realized the Army danced . . . oh? 
. . . what a beautiful Kaydette Kolonel." 

"Lieutenant Mr. Jones, do you think I could have a dance 
with Captain Cooper?" 



Queen Sheila hams it up. 




The pride of the Cadet Brigade. 



SPRING FEVER 



Spring came early this year. Like every year at that time, the warm 
sun provided pleasant leisure time to be spent on the green lawns 
around Lyons Hall. The lure of the pretty sights scattered in gay colors 
around the campus were too much for many noble thoughts of academic 
pursuits. Thoughts of "College Week" in Lauderdale were on the tips 
of the tongues of those fortunate enough to make it. Easter holidays 
provided a well-earned vacation and a chance to catch up on some of 
those neglected studies before exam preparations resumed for the 
last time. 




68 




69 



MEMORIES OF OUR JUNIOR WEEK 



Junior Week Committee — Peter Dec (Junior Show), Anne 
Kicin (Barn Dance), Bob Kelly (General Chairman), 
Richard Harrington (Pops), Dave Melville (Communion 
Breakfast). 





Since Freshman year, we had heard of the exciting Junior 
Week events that were finally ours in the Spring of "60." 
The plans seemed well worth waiting for. The result was one 
of the finest Junior Week programs since the event was 
founded. For those who attended the festivities, there are 
many memories to be relived of a full week's activity. 



The Communion Breakfast. 



The Barn Dance. 



70 




71 



COMMUNION BREAKFAST -A SOLEMN NOTE 



Sunday morning of Junior Week found students and their 
parents gathering at Bapst Auditorium to participate in a 
Family Mass. The event provided an opportunity for parents 
and friends to tour the campus later in the day. Following 
the breakfast, students and parents were addressed by 
William Buckley, author of God and Man at Yale. The entire 
day was one of enjoyment, particularly for those on their 
first visit to Boston College. 




72 




to hear guest speaker William F. Buckley, editor of the National Review 



and enjoy a cordial meal. 




73 



BARN DANCE . . . 
GAIETY PERSONIFIED 



Mosley's on the Charles provided the setting for the 
second event of Junior Week, the Barn Dance. During the 
evening one thing was for sure; even city slickers sometimes 
make better square dancers than the country folk. New 
Hampshire townies had nothing on our boys. Our B.C. 
education has latent effects that can only be seen at times 
like this. "Dos a dos" and "a la main left" rang from out 
the crier's lips in hill-billy fashion. Singing and dancing con- 
tinued till 1 a.m. and was (resumed at private rendezvous. 
As a whole, the event was a pleasant divergence from the 
formal dances held throughout the year. Not even our re- 
nowned "mixers" could stand up to our Junior Barn Dance. 



"Grab your partners, dos a dos." 




74 




75 



THE POPS - AN AESTHETIC EXPERIENCE 




A thoroughly captivated audience listens. 



"Wines, wines, wines, I want a beer.' 




76 




Arthur Fiedler conducts Pops Orchestra in Symphony Hall 
before a typical capacity audience. 



"But I'm sure the car was in that parking lot. 



Light classical and contemporary sounds at Boston Sym- 
phony Hall made B.C.'s "night at the Pops" a refreshing, 
cultured aspect of Junior Week. Arthur Fiedler's direction 
of "Seventy-six Trombones" and "Do-Re-Mi" especially 
delighted the audience. Champagne gave impetus to the 
romantic overtones of the entire evening. Fiedler and Com- 
pany produced music that even Arnie Ginsberg's fans en- 
joyed. By the way, how does artist Arthur survive the 
unsymphonic corking and guzzling? 





Tam-O.' 



78 



JUNIOR SHOW- A TRIUMPH 



If there was any event within Junior Week that stands out 
as something special, it was the Junior Show held at the 
McHugh Forum on that Wednesday evening. Old Spice, 
My Sin contained 14 original songs sung by talented mem- 
bers of the Junior Class. The enthusiastic crowd attending 
the show termed it one of the most professional presenta- 
tions in the history of Junior Shows at Boston College. The 
directors of the show, the talent, and all those who were 
part of this production deserved every accolade that was 
cast their way. 




Serenading a B.C. co-ed. 




"Hurry up . . . dressing girls 
for our first big dance." 



we're getting ready 



Jimmy, the bartender mingles with an "older" customer 
whilst doing "The Tarantella." 





Take the Newport Youth Band 



JAZZ SHOW -A SWINGING AFFAIR 




Roberts Center was the setting of Junior Week's most 
novel event; namely, a Night of Jazz. The latest sounds in 
Jazz composition emerged from the horns of the Newport 
Youth Jazz Band. This was entertainment enough, but the 
repertoire of the "Four Lads" kept the audience on the 
edge of their seats till midnight. 



. add a touch of the "Four Lads'' 



SwM "E ^ TT -'-l-f JW~*^ ^^^ F^TWft ;*-^gJ 




and you've got an enjoyable evening 





... as a well-pleased audience demonstrates 
with much enthusiasm . . . 



. at the Junior Jazz Show. 



81 




JUNIOR 



There is probably only one event in our college career 
that can be considered as important as Commencement and 
that is the Junior Prom. Ours was a great one. A beautiful 
Spring evening at the New Ocean House in Swampscott set 
the stage for the gala event. The Tommy Dorsey Orchestra 
provided the entertainment in a variety of waltzes, polkas, 
jitterbugs and tangos. If there was a more enjoyable social 
gathering that year, it is hard to remember. 



Elizabeth Taylor's arrival occasions a momentary lapse in the door- 
man's duties. 



Prom goers receive unusual favors. 




PROM . . . 




Dancing to the strains of the Tommy Dorsey orchestra. 





j pflF-^^P 




And soon it was over 



83 




^-^ 




The grand march sweeps down the floor in an array of color. 




Queen Anna Marie Pikes poses with her court. 



Midnight Melancholy. 




.A NIGHT OF BEAUTY 



During the evening the dancing paused for the 
selection of the queen of the court. Beautiful Anne 
Marie Pike and dashing Bill Cronin wore the regal 
crowns in the "King and Queen Dance." In the 
closing hour, the Dorsey mood eliminated the 
pumpkins and mice, casting a spell of enchantment. 





I 



/• 



"Guess what, Mom?" 



The winning form. 



85 








A DAY LONG AWAITED 



Four years is a long time to have spent together and it is 
only with sudden realization that the thought of separation 
arises. Friendships and close associations have been formed, 
yet it is with regret that we are forced to view these as passing 
things in many cases. Commencement Day brings such 
thoughts to bear. But the day is not one of sadness, but 
rather the celebration of achievement, the attainment of a 
long sought goal. 

Today signifies for the graduating Senior the culmination 
of four energetic years. Although at times things might have 
hinged on disaster, each one of us weathered the storm and 
today we find reward in the traditional and symbolic wearing 
of cap and gown. 



Our graduation ceremonies begin with an invocation by Richard 
Cardinal Cushing. 



It's also an important day for those who assisted us. 




86 



Some of us have more than one reason to be proud today. 





Looking for glimpses of "their boy." 



Now seniors, in a minute . . . Alumni. 




87 




A FINAL DEPARTURE FOR 



Nothing can detract from this moment as we discard the 
garments of Commencement and recloak ourselves in the 
clothes of the world. There will be as many forks in the 
road as there are members in our class, but no path will be 
untreadable. We have the tools to work this new life in the 
values and disciplines which we have drawn "from Boston 
College. 

We now have the chance to give of ourselves in leading 
those who will forever solicit our assistance. Just as we have 
been nurtured in a greenhouse of ideas, our task' is to con- 
tribute to this world and make it a dwelling place fit for 
Christian men and women. 



It was our last formal assembly as a student body 




\\ /W/ 



THE CLASS OF "61 




we made our exodus . 




and joined the ranks of educated men 




. . . then, congratulations were in order. 








^^H**' 




Robotti 







Shields 







*&*}(?** 







Hughes 






1 



Quinn 






Robinson 







jyLji 



Sellout crowd of 26,000 fans anxiously await the flip of the coin in Navy opener. 



Football Captain Terry Glynn 







7-^1 ' 7 



-*r 



FOOTBALL 



SCORES 

B.C. 7 Navy 22 

B.C. 7 Army 20 

B.C. 12 Marquette 13 

B.C. 17 Detroit 19 

B.C. 14 V.M.I 14 

B.C. 7 Miami 10 

B.C. 20 Villanova 6 

B.C. 23 B.U 14 

B.C. 25 Clemson 14 

B.C. 12 Holy Cross 16 



92 



B.C. ... 7 
NAVY . . 22 

A sellout crowd of 26,000 turned out to witness the coach- 
ing debut of Ernie Hefferle. However, a local lad, All- 
American Joe Bellino, stole the spotlight as he led the Mid- 
shipmen to a 22-7 victory. 

No sooner had the coin been tossed, than Bellino com- 
pleted a long pass to John Pritchard for the opening score. 
The Eagles fought back with a long run by Perreault, with 
McGann going over for the score. Joe Hutchinson, a sopho- 
more, kicked the extra point and B.C. went off at halftime 
with a 7-7 tie. 

A B.C. fumble in the 3rd period ignited the Middies. 
They hammered away at the Eagle defense until Bellino 
scored on a short run to put Navy in front 14-7. In the 4th 
period, the Eagle eleven faltered. Navy's Hal Spooner hit 
the Winchester star with another pass. Joe neatly ran the 
end to make the final count 22-7. 

Don't worry, they're off the schedule next year. 




•9W. GS 



Janas (14) succumbs to the Navy after a 12 yd. pick-up. 



U. S. S. BELLINO TORPEDOES EAGLE DESTROYER 



Graham (84) pivots near the sideline with an Amabile pass tucked safely by his side. 








B. C FALTERS UNDER ARMY'S STRATEGY 



A loyal band of 5,000 supporters followed the Eagles into 
the Hudson Valley as B.C. met the Cadets of West Point. 
Once again the 2nd half proved the Eagles' undoing as they 
were defeated 20-7. 

B.C. dominated the play in the 1st half with quarterback 
John Amabile out-maneuvering and out-passing the fearful 
Cadets. The hard running of Robotti and Perreault sparked 
B.C. in a succession of penetrating drives. One of these, a 
77 yarder, paid off when Perreault hurdled from the 2 yard 
line for the T.D. Hutchinson kicked the point and the Eagles 
ended the 1st half leading 7-0. 

A new version of the "lonely end" was the Army advan- 
tage in the 2nd half. The passing of Tom Blanda to team- 
mate Glen Adams was effective against the B.C. defense. 
Three touchdowns in rapid succession spelled doom for 
the Eagles. 




B.C 7 

ARMY . . 20 




Perreault (43) keeps Army's lonely end 
company on an end-turn. 



Antonellis and Glynn protect a forlorn cadet from flying shrapnel. 





B.C 

MARQUETTE 



12 
13 



A Marquette warrior whoops it up with B.C.'s Mike 
Tomeo (42) on the plains of Wisconsin. 



WARRIORS EDGE EAGLES ON P. AT. 



Undaunted by their two previous setbacks, the squad 
journeyed to Milwaukee, home of Jesuit rival, Marquette. 
B.C. held a decided edge in play, but nonetheless came out 
on the short end of a 13-12 score. 

B.C. faltered in the 1st quarter with penalties and fum- 
bles. With the opening of the 2nd period, Amabile hit Dick 
Gill downfield with a scoring pass to put B.C. in the lead. 
The Eagles threatened again in the 3rd quarter, but a field 
goal attempt was blocked on the Marquette 20. The War- 
riors quickly retaliated as they went the length of the field 
for the equalizer. 

In the final quarter, B.C., sparked by the running of 
Janas and Crump, marched 54 yards for a touchdown, the 
Eagles missing the point after. A late rally by Marquette 
added 7 points and clinched the game 13-12. 



Kirouac (87) "et. al" ambush a redman from Marquette. 




A break in pre-Marquette training sees the B.C. Eagles 
autographing a pigskin for J.F.K., Jr. (?) 



At**- 






' . -V- •'-• "*# V fl 'V 

v - 



ft 



pp ft *f~ jT- 



Detroit University invaded Alumni Field determined to 
prolong the Eagles' losing streak. With John Amabile on the 
injury list, George Van Cott, recovering from a broken 
ankle, was forced to do the subbing. B.C. drew first blood 
in the opening period on Lou Kirouac's field goal from the 
15. Detroit came back fast with a 19 point scoring spree and 
retired at halftime leading 19-3. 

The Eagles retaliated in the 2nd half, but an even stronger 
Detroit defense held them down. In the closing minutes of 
the game, B.C. scored twice. Van Cott hit the mark with a 
21 yard TD pass to Janas. Following the conversion, B.C. 
tallied again as Joe Sikorski snagged Van Cott's pass in the 
end zone. Unfortunately, this fine display still left the Eagles 
behind by 2. 

The Eagles showed determination and an ability to come 
through in the clutch. A warning for future opponents to 
beware was sent out over the wires Monday morning. 



A Titan invader dexterously evades Crump's (33) shoe-string tactics. 



TITANS SURVIVE LATE B.C. SURGE 



B.C. . . . 
DETROIT 



17 
19 




96 



Harry Crump (33) embraces a Van Cott aerial while Ron Dyer (40) watches impatiently. 




B.C.'s alert defense pounces on a V.M.I. 1st quarter fumble to start their first scoring march. 




Joe Sikorski (82) is in flight with B.C.'s final score from the arm of Amabile. 



MAROON AND GOLD STUN UNBEATEN KEYDETS 



Virginia Military Institute, an undefeated newcomer on 
the B.C. schedule, moved onto the Heights rated a solid 
favorite. All the press clippings lauding Ail-American can- 
didate, Howard Dyer, the man with the "golden arm", did 
little to daunt the Eagles' desire for victory. 

Joe Sikorski brought the crowd to its feet early in the 
game as he recovered a V.M.I, fumble on the 2 yard line. 
Seconds later, Bob Perreault dove into the end zone for 6 
points. Victory seemed certain as B.C. took command of 
the game via a 66 yard touchdown march for the 2nd score 
of the game. 

In the 2nd half, despite two brilliant goal line stands by 
the hard-pressed Eagles, the Keydets roared back for 2 
touchdowns under the deft guidance of the classy Dyer. 
The game ended in a 14-14 tie. 

Considering the lopsided pre-game odds, it seemed that 
the undefeated Southern Conference visitors were very 
fortunate to leave Beantown with their unbeaten streak 
intact. 



B.C. 
V.M. 



14 



Qb. George Van Cott (20) rumbles around his favorite end and gets set to 
heave a long pass. 




B.C 7 

MIAMI . . 10 




The Eagles try in vain to smother the kick which proved to be their downfall. 



EAGLES FAIL TO SOAR VS. HURRICANES 



The Eagles' journey to Florida was marked by a pleasant 
surprise when the team was enthusiastically greeted by a 
large contingent of B.C. Alumni at the Sea Isles Hotel in 
Miami Beach. 

B.C., the underdog by 14 points, displayed tremendous 
pass patterns and perfectly executed running plays. On the 
first touchdown drive of the game, Amabile threw 4 perfect 
passes — two to Joe Sikorski for 10 and 14 yards respectively, 
then 18 yards to right half Bob Perreault. Two plays later, 
Lou Kirouac gathered in Amabile's 4th pass for 13 yards, 



placing the ball on the one. Amabile went over on a sneak 
for the T.D. 

High flying Miami backs, injuries and stifling heat com- 
bined in the 2nd half to overcome the spirited B.C. eleven. 
Late in the 4th quarter, with the score tied at 7-7, B.C.'s 
fate was sealed by the accurate toe of the Miami place 
kicker. His field goal won the game for the Floridians. 

The feature event of the day following the game was a 
close victory by the linemen over the backs in a hotly con- 
tested game of water polo. 



In the "la ponz" and another Hurricane fizzles out. 




WILDCATS CAGED 



The "City of Brotherly Love" befittingly became the site 
of B.C.'s first gridiron victory of the season. Although 
hampered by poor weather, injuries and a standout per- 
formance by Villanova's sharp quarterback, the high flying 
Eagles managed to produce the first nest egg. The emergence 
of a strong nucleus of sophomores was the major factor in 
gaining victory. The aggressive backfield of Tomeo, Crump 
and McGann scored two of the three Eagle touchdowns 
serving notice of what Coach Hefferle has in store for the 
next two seasons. 

B.C. scored first with McGann's drive from the 10 yard 



line and Kirouac's conversion. A second run by Robotti in 
the 2nd quarter put the Eagles in front 13-0 at halftime. 
Following the usual 3rd period slump, during which the 
Wildcats scored once, the Eagles bounced back to score 
again with Van Cott's TD pass to McGann. Kirouac settled 
the scoreboard readings at 20-6. 

The acuteness of George Van Cott made the difference in 
this 1st win. The young quarterback, realizing the repeated 
Wildcat shift to the strong side, worked a series of counter 
plays which loosened the Villanova defense and enabled an 
Eagle penetration. 



B.C 

VILLANOVA 



20 
6 



"Try and find a hole if you can.' 




John Flanagan (85) is about to capture himself a wildcat. 



The picture speaks for itself as the "star of the day," Jack McGann, 
races goalward. 







mm, ■ •" 



Van Cott is stopped by the Terrier linemen 4 yds. from 
paydirt. 



An example of the fierce determination which helped Harry 
Crump win the Agganis Award. 




TERRIERS (IM)POUNDED 



If Holy Cross is our traditional rival, then Boston Uni- 
versity is certainly our bitterest foe. Every B.C.-B.U. game 
is a hard fought, action filled contest. Due to last year's 
humiliating defeat, this game promised to be even rougher 
than usual. And the crowd of 22,500 who sat in Alumni 
Stadium and saw the lead change hands four times was 
not disappointed. 

That B.C. won this game was due in large part to the hard 
running of Harry Crump and the solid defensive work of 
George McHugh, who were voted the Agganis Award and 
the outstanding lineman, respectively. 

The game started out slowly, but B.C. ended the 1st half 
leading 10-6. During the next half, both teams came to life. 
The Terriers scored in the 3rd period, and with a 2 point 
conversion, went ahead 14-10. As was the case all year, the 
Eagles couldn't seem to move during this period. It wasn't 
until the final period that Harry Crump led them to 2 touch- 
downs and a victory. 

In the closing minutes of the game, George McHugh 
made the 2nd of his key interceptions, halting a B.U. drive 
at mid-field. The B.C. victory was well earned, and a tre- 
mendous comeback from last year's game. 



Hard running sophomores such as John Janas (14) promise to make 
the Eagles' football future bright. 



100 



B.C. 
B.U. 



. 23 

. 14 



B.C 25 

CLEMSON . . 14 

After two wins over Villanova and B.U., Boston 
College rooters and players eagerly awaited the 
arrival of that perennial Southern power, Clemson. 
This was a club that had invitations to bowls in 
three out of the last four seasons. 

Before four minutes had elapsed, however, B.C. 
had scored on a dramatic interception and touch- 
down run by John Janas. This was to set the mood 
for the 1st half, and when the teams went into the 
locker rooms at halftime, B.C. was leading, 25-0. 

In the 2nd half, the Eagles again dominated the 
play, due to the outstanding work of the line; in- 
cluding a brilliant goal line stand after Clemson had 
made a 1st down on the B.C. 2. 

This was the type of play that the team had been 
promising all year, and their complete dominance 
of this game wasn't demonstrated in the 25-14 final 
score. 

The standouts in this game were Van Cott and 
Eisenhauer. Van Cott stretched his string of com- 
pletions to 15 straight, and Larry was, as ever, great 
in the line. In short, this was the kind of football 
that the B.C. fans had been waiting to see. 




B.C.'s scoring opened with John Janas' brilliant interception and dramatic 
61 yd. scoring runback. 



STRONG CLEMSON RUDELY UPENDED 

A good runner is the man who, after spotting an opening in the enemy defense, uses his blockers to gain extra yardage — Frank Robotti (36) has 
skillfully displayed this talent for the past 4 years. 




101 







The familiar figure of John Amabile about to embarrass two "Fitton-Men." 



CRUSADER'S DARING OUTPOINTS EAGLE'S POWER 



Harry Crump's brilliant maneuvering electrified the fans all season. 




B.C 12 

HOLY CROSS . . 16 



Regardless of what big team may be on the schedule, the 
BIG game of the year is always the encounter with the 
Knights from Worcester. In the past, it has always been 
marked by rainy, cold weather and soggy fields. This year, 
however, the Almanac favored the traditional Jesuit classic. 
On November 27th, Alumni Hall resurrected in full strength 
to witness a fast, hard fought contest. 

The teams were remarkably well matched as they boasted 
similar records. Both were heavily dependent upon sopho- 
mores and both had been impressive in their last few games. 
This battle between the fast developing sophomores on both 
clubs gave good indication of future strength. 

The 1st quarter gave a hint of what was to take place on 
this November afternoon when the Holy Cross quarterback, 
O'Melia Award winner McCarthy, directed a 99 yard drive 




'wtM0***»' m '* m ' 



The "Van Cott Specialty" — a deceptive option play — embarrassed many Crusaders that 
"Fateful Day." 




Lou Kirouac (87) is about to catch up with Crusader 
halfback Tom Hennessy, the "Big Hurt on the Big Day." 



Head down, legs churning, Bob Perreault steams past the puffing 
"applesauceri" 



for the opening touchdown. This was accomplished pri- 
marily by passes in the flat to halfback Tom Hennessy. Holy 
Cross then converted for 2 points with another McCarthy 
to Hennessy pass. 

Boston College retaliated with an 83 yard drive on the 
ground for a T.D. in the 2nd period, but the Crusaders came 
back with an aerial attack to score their second 6 pointer. 
B.C. scored again in the 3rd period but could not put to- 
gether another sustained drive for that 4th and winning 
touchdown. 

Thus, another chapter has been recorded in the longest 
Jesuit rivalry in America. The Crusaders have narrowed the 
margin of victories to place themselves one behind the 
Eagles. The courageous efforts of the departing seniors on 
both squads was again the highlight of the game. 





103 




THE 1960-61 BOSTON COLLEGE FOOTBALL SQUAD 



THE FIGHTING EAGLES 



The splendid progress evidenced in the 1960 edition of the B.C. Eagles 
was due in great part to its coaching staff, from left to right, Gene 
Gibson, Emerson Dickie, Head Coach Ernie Hefferle, Frank Furey, 
Cliff Poirier, Fred Glatz. 




104 




4*fe Wfi 




Perreault 



Amabile 



Gill 



Robinson 





LeBlanc 



McHugh 



105 




The 1961 Eagles line up for the National Anthem. 



HOCKEY 




) «jv n IrioAt, 



B.C. 


12 


B.C. 


6 


B.C. 


1 


B.C. 


5 


B.C. 


2 


B.C. 


6 


B.C. 


1 


B.C. 


7 


B.C. 


6 


B.C. 


1 


B.C. 


4 


B.C. 


12 


B.C. 


4 


B.C. 


8 


B.C. 


15 


B.C. 


10 


B.C. 


7 


B.C. 


4 


B.C. 


6 


B.C. 


3 


B.C. 


7 


B.C. 





B.C. 


2 


B.C. 


10 


B.C. 


4 



SCORES 

Brown 1 

Yale 1 

R.P.I 1 

Clarkson 3 

Laval 1 

Toronto 2 

Harvard 2 

Brown 2 

St. Lawrence 4 

Harvard 4 

R.P.I 7 

Princeton 2 

Providence 1 

Colby 2 

N.U 1 

Dartmouth 2 

Providence 2 

Harvard 2 

Colby 3 

Army 2 

B.U 2 

St. Lawrence 3 

Clarkson 3 

N.U 

B.U 2 



106 





Prospective AH-American Bill Daley, lifts one by the Larries' netminder in an early season win. 



THE FLYING EAGLES 



Aggressive Owen Hughes slides toward the cage, preceded by the disk. 






A far-famed Eagle combination— Martin (15) to Daley (12)— leads the 
attack across the blue line. 



Impenetrable Jim Logue exhibits the playing which gained 
him the reputation as one of the foremost netminders in 
the nation. 



Jack Leetch and Bill Daley (12) dig for the rubber in the 
enemy zone. 




The 1960-1961 hockey season, highlighted by the Silver 
Anniversary of Coach John "Snooks" Kelley and his out- 
standing record of 300-plus wins, reconfirmed Boston Col- 
lege's supremacy in Eastern college hockey. Despite the loss 
of seven seniors, early predictions labeled B.C. a top con- 
tender for local and national crowns. The season's opener 
gave credibility to these forecasts. Led by Captain Tom 
"Red" Martin, the Eagles trounced a weak Brown Univer- 
sity 12-1. Colorful Bill Daley made his debut with a hat 
trick and an impressive display of stick handling. New- 
comers Bill Hogan, Jack Leetch and Paul Aiken tallied 4 
goals and 2 assists, while George Grant and Owen Hughes 
shared in the scoring spree with 2 goals apiece. John Calla- 
han, playing his first game at the point position, proved a 
solid and promising Sophomore defenseman. 

The customary sellout crowd at McHugh Forum saw the 
Ivy leaves of Yale wither and linemates Hughes and Leetch 
combine for 4 goals as B.C. dominated the play in a 6-1 
victory. The first "clog-in-the-wheel" was dealt by R.P.I, as 
the Engineers held B.C. to a 1-1 tie. The lone B.C. tally was 
a 36 foot lift by Callahan past a stunned R.P.I, netminder. 
Special laurels were accorded Jim Logue for a spectacular 
save on Trevor Kaye, who split the defense at the blue line 



* 



/^ **. 




M 








"Sully" goes down as Famiglietti moves in for the rebound. 



A solo jaunt down the ice results in a near miss vs. the 
Jawns from across the Charles. 



Goalie Jim Logue deftly moves out of the crease to entangle the "Ivy" and smother the puck. 




109 






Logue's acrobatics evoke a worried look from Capt. "Red" Martin. 




The Maroon and Gold defense stops the Harvard attack as Daley (12) 
starts a fast break. 









only to be thwarted by "the Benter". The second of the 
New York contingent, Clarkson, was driven back to Canton 
in defeat after the Eagles came from behind twice to win 5-3. 

Following a Christmas layoff the Kelleymen handed the 
most notable upset of the season to Laval University. The 
visitors from Quebec City were outshot 42-10 in one of 
B.C.'s finest hockey exhibitions. Flashy Bill Daley scored 
both goals in the 2-1 thriller. A second group of highly 
rated Canadians from the University of Toronto dared the 
Eagles into the greatest comeback of the season. With two 
quick tallies in less than five minutes the visitors fanned 
their pace allowing an opportunist, Owen Hughes, to flash 
back with the two levelers. Jack Leetch put B.C. ahead 3-2 
with a long backhander and opened the nets for three more 
tallies in the final period. 

With a New Year's record of 5-0-1, B.C. faltered in a 2-1 
defeat with the Cambridge Jawns. Bill Hogan registered the 
lone goal at McHugh Forum, while Crimson captain Stu 
Forbes came back in the final period with the equalizer. At 
3:49 in overtime Jerry Jorgenson flashed the redlight to 
secure a Harvard victory. The team then journeyed to Rhode 



Leetch (left) and Hughes converge on the enemy goal for a "lamp- 
lighter.' 










"The Fearless Irishman," Owen Hughes, slips one by the outstretched leg of 
the Jawn netminder. 



Island to trounce Brown University 7-2. In a home game 
against Terry Stater and company, Owen Hughes worked 
his first hat trick, while Daley and Hogan planted 3 goals 
to register a 6-4 victory over St. Lawrence. All-American 
Red Martin remained invincible at the point as Jim Logue 
balked the semi-Canadians with 34 saves. 

After bouncing back into the winning column B.C. crossed 
the Eliot to a sub-zero Watson Rink. Harvard playing a 
hard checking, close covering game, backed by Bob Bland's 
standout performance in the net came across with a 4-1 
victory. Hughes' goal in the second period failed to ignite 
the Eagles to materialize on numerous opportunities. B.C. 
suffered its third loss of the season against the first place 
Engineers. Before a packed crowd in the Troy arena B.C. 
succumbed to the powerful R.P.I, men 7-4 as a near riot 
flared at the game's end. 

With a shift in lines, Coach Kelley achieved improvement 
in balance and strength. This was clearly indicated in the 
next three victories 12-2 over Princeton, 4-1 over Providence, 
and 8-2 over Colby. Tiny Ed Sullivan assisted Bill Daley in 
collecting three hat tricks, while Captain Martin reached 




An important win generates excitement on the ice as well as 
in the stands. 



Ill 




Hughes, on a breakaway, is tripped up 
by a Colby defenseman. 



A three-on-two break nets the Eagles a score in 
a key game against the Larries from upstate 
New York. 




Close — but the black spot doesn't transverse 
the crease, (i.e. we didn't score) 




112 



the 100 point mark in his laudable college record. In the 
Beanpot Tournament, B.C. whipped Northeastern 15-1 in 
a revenge tilt, with Ed Sullivan accumulating 5 goals, Bill 
Hogan 4 goals, and Daley racking 6 points. Between Bean- 
pot games, the champagne was corked in honor of "Snooks" 
Kelley's 300th win. Dartmouth's defeat established Coach 
Kelley as the Dean of American College Hockey Coaches. 
The finals of the Beanpot, played before a capacity (13,909) 
crowd at the Garden, saw the Eagles uproot the season's 
nemesis. B.C. disposed of Harvard 4-2 in excellent fashion 
as the ecstatic B.C. crowd cheered for more beans and 
deflated "egos." 

Riding high on a second string of wins over Colby, Army, 
and B.U., the Eagles flew north. In the Appleton Arena the 
Larries overpowered B.C. in a 3-0 shutout. All-American 
Terry Slater directed the St. Lawrence playmaking in this 
important win. On the following night B.C. was edged in 
the last minutes by an aggressive Clarkson (3-2). The two 
setbacks resulted in B.C.'s losing the desired bid to the 
N.C.A.A. Tournament in Denver. 

In the last game of the season at McHugh Forum, special 
laurels were accorded seniors Bill Daley, Bob Famigletti, 
Owen Hughes, Fran Larkin, Jim Logue, and Tom Martin 
after their win over Northeastern. Jim Logue posted his 
first shut-out of the season and Bill Daley crashed an all- 
time B.C. scoring record as he notched his 74th point. In 
the social activities following the game "toastmaster" Red 
Martin and "social chairmen" Daley and Hughes presented 
the Kelley family flowers, a mounted puck, a silver dollar 
rink and a spiritual bouquet in tribute to the coach's Silver 
Anniversary. 





Sometimes the approach from the wrong side is more suc- 
cessful — at least Paul Aiken hopes it will be. 




Flying sticks and flying referees' legs are usually 
characteristic of a faceoff. 



113 



The Boston Arena, bedecked with chicken wire and soft 
ice, was the setting for the Eagles' season finale. The en- 
counter with B.U. was to be the final selling point for B.C.'s 
N.C.A.A. tourney aspirations. The hard play of the Terriers 
in the first period held the Eagles to one goal. Jack Leetch 
sparked the Kelleymen in the latter two periods with 3 goals 
and a 4-2 victory. Despite this important win and the best 
record in Eastern hockey, the tourney judges were not sold 
on B.C.'s ability and power. 

The reward of this 1960-1961 team rests in its possession 
of the prized Beanpot, its supremacy in Eastern hockey and 
the satisfaction of delighting each of its sellout crowds. 




Who stole the puck? 



Bob Famiglietti (background) waits in vain as George Grant is smothered by the Colby hordes. 





A "Mule" tightropes along the boards as the Colby goalie surveys the situation through his 
fog-bound headmask. 



THE 1961 BOSTON COLLEGE HOCKEY TEAM 





Coach John (Snooks) Kelley 




BASKETBALL 



With hopes of attaining basketball primacy in the New 
England area, Boston College entered the 2nd year of a re- 
building process. The strength of the 1960-61 Eagles was 
provided by the return of seven veterans and a group of 
capable hoopsters from last year's Freshmen squad. The 
excellent coaching of Dino Martin was manifested in B.C.'s 
winning record. The close finish behind Providence and 
Holy Cross, two outstanding teams in the National Invi- 
tational Tournament, was good indication of a new era in 
basketball history at Boston College. 

In the season's opener with Fairfield University, the B.C. 
starting five, Captain Frank Quinn, Jim Hooley, Bill Dono- 
van, Chuck Chevalier and Jerry Power topped the opposing 
Jesuit rival 83-70. To the cheers of an approving B.C. crowd, 
Jim Hooley netted 34 points in professional style. Scrappy 
Chuck Chevalier found enough holes in the Fairfield zone 
to keep the opponents bewildered with his passing. The un- 




Bumps and bruises wins possession of the ball for Bill Foley (14). 




Brawny "Sky" Quinn (55) strains for a high rebound vs. the N.I.T. 
bound Friars. 



117 




expected standout performance by Sophomore Gerry Ward 
in defending against Fairfield ace, Art Crawford, drew high 
praise from Coach Martin and his teammates. 

On the first road trip of the season, the Eagles outscored 
the University of Rhode Island, eventual Yankee Con- 
ference Champs, 85-79. Again Ward and Hooley held the 
limelight with 24 and 22 points respectively. Rhode Island 
pointmakers Lee and Multer were held back by the hustle 
of guard, Bill Foley. A second Yankee Conference power, 
the University of Connecticut, was next to be listed in the 
Eagles' win column. Sharpshooters on both teams enjoyed 
a field day as the final score read 110-96. This was the first 
Martin-squad to reach triple figures in his coaching career 
at B.C. Scoring honors went to Bill Donovan, as the new 
threat tallied 28 points. 

Against Dartmouth at Hanover, New Hampshire, B.C. 
hit the magic figure for the second time. Captain Frank 
Quinn led the Eagles to a 100-96 victory over the "Carnival- 
Men." Donovan, Hooley and Power collectively accumu- 



6'10" Jim Hadnot (54) gets "hooked" in the net as Frank 
Quinn snags a rebound. 



A scramble under the cords is in vain as Jim Hooley (43) lets fly with a two-pointer. 




118 



lated 5 more points than the entire Dartmouth quintet. 
Capt. Quinn and Fitzpatrick outstretched the opponents to 
control both boards. 

The Crimson became the fifth victim of B.C.'s winning 
streak in a lopsided decision, 88-51. The weak Harvard five 
faltered from the toss-up by leaving Frank Quinn unguarded 
in the key, thus allowing the Captain numerous lay up op- 
portunities and easy set ups. At the game's end, the score 
sheet revealed all five of the Eagle starters reached double 
figures. 

The season prospects darkened unexpectedly when the 
Heightsmen succumbed to a keyed up Brown U. squad. The 
Bruins upset the Eagles 76-70. With an effective defense 
stopping Hooley and Donovan, Sophomores Ward and 
Power kept B.C. intact, but without enduring success. A 
spectacular full-court hook by Jerry Power at the buzzer 
set the crowd on their feet, yet failed to wrest the glory from 
the Brown victory. Nationally ranked Seton Hall was next 
on the B.C. agenda. The Eagles' triple figure wins reversed 



An over-the-head, left-handed, blind hook shot by Foley (14)- 
it went in ! 





Friar center, Hadnot (54) descends from the stratosphere "mid" ball. 



119 




A behind-the-back, driving layup nets a "duo" for 
Chuck Chevalier (30). 



Bill Donovan's unique set shot clicks for a basket. 




'It's the follow through that counts." 



120 




in this Orange, New Jersey tilt, as B.C. was overpowered 
105-87. Until the final minutes of the game, the B.C. threat 
over Seton Hall was strong. Jim Hooley proved his offensive 
worth in netting 26 points over the obstinate Pirate defense. 

The Heightsmen refused to let up in practice over the 
Christmas vacation. Returning early to the campus, the 
Eagles grinded through long practice sessions, determined 
to open another winning streak. In a close contest with the 
musically-inclined Comm. Ave. rivals, the Martinmen rallied 
in the late minutes to an 85-58 victory. B.U.'s Larry Isen- 
berg, the second highest scorer in Boston behind Hooley, 
was held to 10 points by defenseman Gerry Ward. 

The clash of two highly rated New England teams was 
next on the schedule. The Providence College Alumni 
Auditorium was sold out weeks in advance, but only the 
Friar fans got their money's worth as the future N.I.T. 
Champs managed a 75-65 decision over the Eagles. Popular 
N.I.T. choice, John Egan, broke through the Martinmen 
defense in the last five minutes of the game. The small state 
opponents capitalized on the opportunity and scored the 
winning 10 points. B.C.'s ace Jim Hooley maintained con- 
sistency with 18 hard earned points. 

Bearing a notion of weakness in the Eagle squad, the 
Crusaders journeyed to Roberts Center for another classic 
joust. The Purple were baffled in their 79-78 defeat. Jim 
Hooley contributed the high, 21 points. Jack "the shot" 
Foley was stifled by hard-to-beat defenseman Bill Foley. At 
the conclusion the faulty clock favored Holy Cross with 
eight bonus seconds, but the Crusaders were unable to score. 

Shortly after the surprised Crusaders left Robert's Center, 
a fearful crew of Middies arrived. Boasting the newly ac- 
quired Sugar Bowl crown, Navy felt a victory in the air. 




fitf 




Four-to-one odds doesn't deter Eagle's Jim Hooley. 




The Foley boys rub elbows on the basketball floor. 




B.C.'s version of Bob Cousy — Chuck Chevalier — baffles the 
"Purple-men." 



121 



But the spirited Eagles were not to be subdued as they con- 
quered 71-59. Chuck Chevalier's two minute freeze toward 
the end of the game had the fans shouting for more of the 
Cousy-protege's razzle-dazzle. The first major injury of the 
season was the price of glory for the Eagles. Captain Frank 
Quinn, taking a bad spill in the 3rd period, was sidelined 
for three weeks with a cracked elbow. A second serious blow 
to the team's aspirations was the loss of high scorer Jim 
Hooley and reserve center Reynolds for academic de- 
ficiencies. 

The loss of strength was evident in the close contest with 
Fordham University. B.C.'s flight was aided by the fine de- 
fensive play of Gerry Ward, but even his exceptional per- 
formance couldn't muster the necessary 3 points for the win. 

At New Haven, Connecticut, B.C. dropped another close 
one to Yale 69-65. The first half accumulation of 19 points 
made the Eagles' uphill grind too steep. The "Ivy" sustained 
their lead throughout, taking good shots only and with 
success. The return of recuperating Frank Quinn offered 




The Minuet in Mid Air. 



"The high flying Eagles" is no mere cliche. 



Hooley serves up a score waiter style. 






teammates new inspiration in the second half. Bill Donovan 
landed 21 points in the 2nd half to take the scoring honors, 
while Chevalier was close behind with 18. 

The long journey to West Point, over miles of drifted 
snow, frost bit the Eagles into the greatest upset of the 
season. The heavily favored Cadets, who were currently 
listed third in the East, were surprisingly outclassed (86-62) 
by the scrappy Martinmen. The key to breaking Army's nine 
game winning streak was great team effort by the B.C. five. 
Chevalier's flawless passing set up Gerry Ward as high 
scorer with 23, while Quinn, Power and Foley managed to 
reach double figures. A second snowstorm forced the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh to cancel out; thus leaving the Eagles 
a week of practice in preparation for Georgetown and giant 
St. Bonaventure. In the game at Washington, D.C. the 
Heightsmen were the victims of Georgetown's best per- 
formance of the season. Against complete control over the 
boards and fantastic accuracy from the floor, B.C. was un- 
able to match the D.C. quintet. Coach Martin's Alma Mater 



'Up, up and away." 



A Friar heads for the door as play gets rough — and B.C. scores. 



/ 




THE 1961 BOSTON COLLEGE BASKETBALL TEAM 



downed the Eagles 102-78. Only Bill Donovan played up to 
par by scoring one fourth of the Eagles final accumulation. 
On the following night in Buffalo, New York, B.C. met their 
strongest opponent in eastern collegiate basketball, St. 
Bonaventure. Trailing by 1 3 points after the third period, the 
Eagles nose-dived in the final fifteen minutes. All-Americans 
Tom Stith and Fred Crawford were too strong for the B.C. 
defense, both scoring 26 and 27 points respectively. The St. 
Bonaventure quintet billed a 103-69 score after a wild scor- 
ing spree at the game's end. 

The Heightsmen closed the season on a favorable note. 
Against Syracuse there were no spectacular performances 
other than effective team effort. 

With only Frank Quinn graduating, we have a promising 
Freshman squad and a host of returning veterans. The 1962- 
1963 basketball Eagles should bring even greater laurels to 
the Heights. 




Coach Don "Dino" Martin 



124 




The sprinters go by in a blur of motion as Jim Duff (fourth from right) gets set to make his move. 



TRACK 



The Boston College track team under the direction of 
their capable coach, Bill Gilligan, took another step forward 
this year towards becoming one of the most highly rated 
teams in New England. 

Led by Larry Rawson, Jim Duffy, Mike Scully, Doug 
MacQuarrie, James McMahon and John Hurley, the cross- 
country team again had a successful season with victories 
over Northeastern, Boston University, Tufts, M.I.T. and 
Brandeis. This string of victories served as a tune-up for the 
indoor season. 

Captain Walter Shields, who scored in three events, led 
the finest and most promising group of Sophomores ever to 
come to the Heights into the indoor season with the initial 
trouncing over M.I.T. Boston College's depth was the telling 
factor in this meet as the Eagles placed two or three men in 
each of the distance races. 



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125 




This Eagle is really soaring. 




Three weeks later the quartet of Larry Flynn, James 
Rinella, John McNamara and Sam Vincent showed the 
other relay teams competing in the big Knights of Columbus 
meet that Boston College was a team worth watching. This 
group won their heat in the mile relay handily, but the big 
night was to follow in two weeks. 

The annual B.A.A. games, much to the delight of the 
partisan crowd, saw Boston College win more medals than 
any other team in the relay events including such powers as 
Holy Cross, Villanova, and Manhattan. 

The team of Jim Duff, Mike Scully, Jim McMahon and 
Larry Rawson won their heat in the two-mile relay, out- 
distancing Harvard and Brown. This was followed by four 
more gold medals won by Larry Flynn, Jim Rinella, James 
Duff and Jack McNamara in the mile relay. The Freshmen 
capped the night by also winning their relay. 



Grim determination shows forth as Wally Shields approaches 
the hurdle. 



126 



The Eagle Harriers finished off their season in the annual 
running of the I.C.4-A championships at Madison Square 
Garden in late March. Larry Rawson calmly trotted off a 
4:18:1 mile to win his trial heat. This qualifying time was 
the second best mile of the meet. Unfortunately, Larry was 
timed in 4:21 in his next endeavor, giving him 8th place for 
the entire contest. 

With boys like George Desnogen, Sam Vincent and Cap- 
tain Shields in the broad jump and pole vault; Jack Mc- 
Namara, John Hurley, Jim Duff, Larry Rawson, Mike 
Scully, Jim Owens, Doug MacQuarrie in the running events; 
coupled with Bill Cunis, Larry Flynn and Dick Becquerer 
in the sprints and hurdles, the season as a whole was termed 
by all a success. Coach Bill Gilligan may well be proud of 
his 10th track edition. 





Coach William Gilligan and the 1960 Freshmen squad. 



THE 1960-1961 BOSTON COLLEGE TRACK TEAM 



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The Greater Boston Collegiate League Championship was 
the prediction of the scribes for the 1960 Boston College 
baseball team. Setting its sights on this mark, the talented 
Eagles exceeded pre-season expectations by capping not only 
the Boston title but also the NCAA District I championship. 
Sporting a 13-4 record, the Pellagrinimen traveled to Omaha, 
Nebraska for the College World Series where they managed 
to win 1 and lose 2. It was the first trip to the tourney for 
the Eagles and a sign of things to come. 

The Pellagrinimen proved their worth in the opening 
game by defeating the Engineers of MIT by the score of 
6-0. Seeking their second victory of the season, the Eagles 
found a weak BU team and walloped them 8-1 behind the 
power hitting of Billy Daly and Billy Cunis. 

Following a tight 4-3 win over John Harvard, B.C. 
traveled to Tufts for its initial test of strength. Weak hitting 
and a base on balls with the bases loaded in the ninth inning 
sent the Eagles home with the taste of defeat on their lips. 
The unsavory taste of the Tufts' loss was not to remain. 
B.C. regained its winning stride via an 11-3 defeat of Colby 
and a 12-5 victory over the Huskies of Northeastern. Cunis 
and Dave Bilodeau led the attack against Northeastern; 
Cunis hitting a 400 foot home run and Bilodeau driving in 
five runs. . 



BASEBALL 



THE 1960 BOSTON COLLEGE BASEBALL TEAM 




An onrushing Crusader poses no problem for 
smooth-fielding "Red" Martin. 





The Maroon and Gold relax on the bench on 
the way to a 14-1 victory over H.C. on Alumni 
Day. 




Sporting a 5 and 1 record, the high-minded Eagles en- 
countered Harvard. Combining the pitching skill of Bill 
Robinson and the batting of the outfield, the team exploded 
for a 13-4 win. Continuing their "hot" batting, the Eagles 
defeated the Providence Friars 8-4. 

With a four game string going in which they outscored 
their opponents 46-16, the Eagles were defeated by a strong 
Amherst 14-5. Over-confidence and weak pitching in the 
first three innings, in which Amherst scored nine times, were 
blamed for the defeat. These factors were erased as Charlie 
Bunker pitched the Eagles to a 6-5 win over St. Peters. 

As the NCAA tournament was being talked about \)y 
local scribes and mystica, Suffolk U. came to the Heights 
and edged out the Eagles 8-7. This jolt to tourney hopes 
was relieved when B.C. traveled to Providence for the second 
game against the Friars. In the ensuing slug-fesf, it took 
three innings of relief pitching by Bill Robinson to finally 
quell the storm and preserve the 10-7 victory. 

After a win over Northeastern, B.C. tackled Tufts for the 
Greater Boston League title. Behind Bill Robinson's four 



Rhetorical skills of the unhappy "apple-saucers" gain small 
favor with the infallible umpire. 



129 



hit pitching and two homers by Captain Bob Martin, the 
B.C. team copped the title and a chance to compete for an 
NCAA title berth. 

B.C. opened its annual three game series with Holy Cross 
by being defeated on a no-hitter by Gene Malinowski. B.C. 
was never dominant in the contest with 21 batters being 
retired in a row. After a 2-1 victory over the University of 
Connecticut, which enhanced its chance for a berth in the 
NCAA playoff, B.C. met Holy Cross in the second game of 
the series and emerged with a 5-4 victory. This win gave the 
Eagles the District I championship. The "consolation" game 
played before an energetic Alumni Day crowd found B.C. 
clouting three H.C. pitchers for fourteen runs. The game 
was called at the end of seven innings to enable the Maroon 
and Gold to catch a plane for Omaha and the NCAA 
tourney. 

In the initial contest against powerful Colorado State 
B.C. triumphed by an 8-3 score. Star-studded Southern 
California was the next hurdle. Plagued by a lack of timely 
hitting, the Eagles bowed 5-2 and the Trojans thus gained a 
tie for first place with Univ. of Minnesota. The following 
day B.C. was eliminated from the tournament when a costly 
error in the last of the ninth gave Oklahoma State the only 
run of the game. 

Although the elimination was a big disappointment for 
the Eagles, the chances for many return trips in the future 
was evident in their showing. 





A "Fitton-man," typically posed, lies prone on the B.C. turf. 



A study in mixed emotions. 



First base can be a long way off. 






THE 1961 BOSTON COLLEGE GOLF TEAM 



GOLF 



Capt. Jim Burke (right) reminds teammates of "no golf on campus" rule. 



As Spring approaches, the mind of the golf enthusiasts 
turns toward the fairways. With the coming of warmer 
weather, the Boston College Golf Team will follow the path 
of the linksmen to the first tee. Out of the closet come the 
clubs and balls and those abominable little yellow tees which 
are forever being lost, all in preparation for the oncoming 
season. 

As the Eagle linksmen begin their daily journeys to the 
magnificent roughs, woods and sand traps of the Charles 
River Country Club, they eye the grueling schedule ahead 
of them. To Captain Jim Burke, it is an especially awesome 
spectacle. With 4 of last year's 7 regulars graduated, Jim 
has the task of welding together a winning team around his 
remaining veterans. A talented group of underclassmen in- 
cluding Walter Erwin, Bill Johnson, Bill Sheehan, Bill 
Mahoney, Dave Pickering, Charlie Carr and Dave Reynolds 
should prove capable of taking up the gap left by graduation. 

The big test will come for these Eagle hopefuls when the 
team travels to Florida for the Miami Invitational Golf 
Tournament at Coral Gables. Following that foray, the 
linksmen return to oppose the powers of Boston and the 
New England area. The final success of the year will be 
determined when the B.C. team competes in the Eastern 
Intercollegiate and the Boston Collegiate Tourneys to be 
held late in the Spring. 




131 



SAILING TEAM 

Under the guidance of Commodore Pat Hughes, the 
Sailing Team' of Jack Hurley, Norm Towle, Dick Gieuere 
and Dave Oberhausser had a highly successful season. Their 
yachts could be seen on the Charles River every weekend in 
the spring and fall. This past year the team won the Mel 
Stente Cup (Holy Cross Dual Meet), and came in second in 
the Coast Guard Quadrangle, winning the Raren Class. 
Jack Hurley and Norm Towle won the Bishop Donaghy 
Trophy, and Dave Oberhausser was voted best crew man 
in New England. 

The outlook for next year seems bright for the B.C. sailing 
enthusiasts. 



A head on collision with a garbage scow in Boston Harbor 
is 'imminent. 




9.* 



&* 



a* 



ifr 





Grace . . . elegance . . . beauty . . . design. 








THE 1960-1961 BOSTON COLLEGE SKI TEAM 



Though skiing in New England is scarcely 25 years old, 
Boston College has rapidly come into its own as a university 
for the outdoor winter sports enthusiast. Founded in 1947 
by Dr. Ed Long, the Ski Team usually begins its long weeks 
of arduous training early in October when the only snow 
lies scattered on the upper slopes of New Hampshire's 
mighty Mt. Washington. 

The team is guided quite capably by Coach Neil Fitz- 
gerald, once a collegiate racer himself. Over the past two 
years, Fitzgerald has literally pulled the team up by its boot- 
straps until B.C. now stands as one of the strongest entries 
in the New England Intercollegiate Ski Conference. By con- 
tinuing to show the effort, a good racing technique and 
sportsmanship which has been an integral part of the team 
for over a decade, B.C. will continue its outstanding per- 
formances for many a season. 



SKI TEAM 




Up, up, up. 




Down, down, down. 




133 



A 



C 



A 



D 



E 



M 



C 



S 






It is through the capable 
leadership of the Society of 
Jesus, the foresight and genius 
of its administrators, the 
excellence of our educative staff 
and our well-devised and 
effective academic programs that 
Boston College enjoys the 
estimable reputation which is 
hers. But for the student to 
take advantage of these provisions 
alone is not enough. He must 
spend long hours in self-activity. 
The thirst for knowledge may 
vary with the individual, but 
without the spirit of inquiry, 
without the "scholar's quest," 
the change known as education 
cannot take place. 



A 
C 



A 



J) 
M 



C 
S 







U 






It is through the capable 
leadership of the Society of 
Jesus, the foresight and genius 
of its administrators, the 
excellence of our educative staff 
and our well-devised and 
effective academic programs that 
Boston College enjoys the 
estimable reputation which is 
hers. But for the student to 
take advantage of these provisions 
alone is not enough. He must 
spend long hours in self-activity. 
The thirst for knowledge may 
vary with the individual, but 
without the spirit of inquiry, 
without the "scholar's quest," 
the change known as education 
cannot take place. 



A Message For The CLASS OF 1961 

From The Most Reverend 
MICHAEL WALSH, S.J. 



To the Class of 1961: 

As you gather for the last time as undergraduates in the colorful 
assemblies which climax the academic year, the final Ave atque vale 
is given and received in the ceremony we paradoxically and truly call 
commencement. Now the burden and the joy of University life will 
find a wider meaning in the context of the world, where the landfalls 
and sorties of the academic adventure will be translated into respon- 
sible and generous leadership in neighborhood, parish and state. 

Each graduating class adds its portion to the heritage of Uni- 
versity life. Its youth keeps the University young. Its hopes and ideals 
keep the University dedicated and free. Its love prompts the Uni- 
versity to dare to borrow a title from the Mother of God and allow 
her students to call her Alma Mater. 

Although the Jesuit and Lay Faculty members are the cadre of 
University life, it is the students who make up the great body of the 
commonwealth of learning. As we set our hand and seal to your 
scrolls of honor, we gladly testify that you have admirably served 
your apprenticeship in the company of learned men. Our hopes speed 
you to fresh triumphs in the sacred and learned professions, in the 
market squares of business, and in the noble and perilous craft of 
political life. God keep you in the free citizenship of His grace! God 
uplift and comfort you in the glory of the years ahead ! 

Yours faithfully in Christ, 



i^ruJuuJ P.OtoM.Sf. 



Michael P. Walsh, S.J. 
President 



139 




Rev. Francis C. Mackin, S.J. 



EXECUTIVE 
ASSISTANT 

TO THE 
PRESIDENT 



UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION 



140 




TREASURER 



Rev. Thomas Fleming, S.J. 



Rev. Francis B. McManus, S.J. 



SECRETARY 





DIRECTOR 

OF 
LIBRARIES 



Rev. Brendan C. Connolly, S.J. 



BUSINESS 
MANAGER 



Rev. John E. Murphy, S.J. 



142 





DIRECTOR 

OF 

ADMISSIONS 



Rev. Edmond D. Walsh, S.J. 



DIRECTOR 

OF 

RESIDENT 

STUDENTS 



Rev. David F. Carroll, S.J. 




143 




Weston M. Jenks, Jr., M.Ed. 
Director of Guidance 



Rev. Richard G. Shea, S.J. 
Student Counselor 




ADMINISTRATIVE 





Henry J. McMahon, A.M. 
Assistant Dean 



THE 



COLLEGE 



OF 



FACULTY OF 




ARTS 



AND 

SCIENCES 



f 1%,^^ pi 




John A. McCarthy, S.J. 
Dean 




Eileen M. Tosney, A.M. 
Registrar 



Rev. Joseph L. Shea, S.J. 
Dean of Men 




fl 



John C. Conway, A.M. 
Registrar 





ADMINISTRATIVE 



COLLEGE OF 



Rev. George F. Lawlor, S.J. 
Director of Guidance 




Donald J. White, Ph.D. 
Associate Dean 



146 



Rev. Charles J. Reardon, S.J. 
Student Counselor 



Rev. W. Seavey Joyce, S.J. 
Dean 



^_i 




FACULTY OF THE 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Rev. Francis B. McManus, S.J. 
Dean of Men 





147 




ADMINISTRATIVE 



THE SCHOOL 



Rev. Robert F. Hoey, S.J. 

Assistant Dean 




Rev. Robert T. Ferrick, S.J. 
Student Counselor 



148 



Elizabeth A. Strain, M.Ed. 
Registrar 




FACULTY OF 



OF EDUCATION 




Rev. Charles F. Donovan, S.J. 
Dean 




Joseph L. Driscoll, D.Ed. 
Director of Student Teaching 



% 



Wk 0gM 



Mary T. Kinnane, A.M. 
Dean of Women 



149 



Pauline R. Sampson, R.N., M.Ed. 
Assistant Dean 





Catherine M. Crosby, A.B. 
Registrar 



Rev. Edward J. Gorman, S.J. 

Student Counselor 




ADMINISTRATIVE 



THE SCHOOL 




Rita P. Kelleher, R.N., M.Ed. 
Dean 




Rev. Walter J. Meagher, S.J. 
Spiritual Counselor 



Gushing Hall 



FACULTY OF 



OF NURSING 




m .* 



Rev. John J. Crowley, S.J. 
Dean 




ADMINISTRATIVE FACULTY OF 
THE EVENING SCHOOL 



Katherine M. Hastings, A.M. 
Registrar 





ACADEMIC 
DEPARTMENTS 



■ i* l .i 



ACCOUNTING 

Lifo, Fifo . . . auditing the books . . . assets, liabilities, 
net worth . . . "where's my pencil?" . . . transactions . . . 
ledgers . . . large yellow papers . . . trial balance . . . white 
collars, dirty cuffs . . . the science of business . . . when 
in doubt, credit cash . . . C.P.A. . . . "now, who stole the 
pencil sharpener?" . . . Lybrand, Ross Bros., and Mont- 
gomery . . . reconcile that cash . . . "debits are NOT next 
to the window" . . . 



Arthur L. Glynn 
Chairman, Department of Accounting 




Professor Dunn explains the merits of Accounting as an elective in an 
informal corridor lesson. 



Professor Bruno occupies himself 
with the arduous task of correct- 
ing mid-year exams. 



154 




BIOLOGY 



microscopic and macroscopic anatomy . . . swelling of 
the cerebellum . . . hyper secretion of the thyroid . . . 
dilation of the internal carotids . . . higher mathematical 
concepts such as the multiplication of rabbits . . . train- 
ing for frog-catching in the physiology lab . . . increasing 
the world's population of fruit flies . . . constructing 
nerves out of muscles fibers . . . it's a long long way to 
amphioxus . . . pre med . . . vertebrates . . . A.M. A. . . . 
culture . . . botany . . . 




Rev. William D. Sullivan, S.J. 
Chairman, Department of Biology 



A member of the 'Night Owl Corps' works in the laboratory. 




Students engage in operating on a Rana pipiens. 




155 




James E. Shaw, Chairman, Department of Business Law. 



BUSINESS LAW 



Mr. Murray and Mr. Hickey exchange legal opinions on 
price-fixing enforcement. 




negotiable instruments . . . breach of contract . . . prin- 
cipals and agent . . . duress and under the influence . . . 
plaintiff and defendant . . . Taylor vs. Pratt . . . issue, 
what is the issue? . . . "Patent that trade secret" . . . pull 
up your pants and socks . . . the Judge has spoken . . . 
cases, cases, cases, cases . . . Holmes, Hughes, and Hand 
. . . under 21 — No. . . . 



Professor Harrington, relaxing between classes, ponders about the 
problems of the Squantum Yacht Club. 



156 





The value of human lung power is demonstrated in a laboratory 
experiment. 



soluble solution . . . "you can tell it's H 2 S0 4 by the way 
it eats away at your fingers" . . . labs . . . entropy and 
enthalpy . . . Lavoisier ... do you all know how to light 
a Bunsen burner? . . . Boyle's law . . . "from those that 
have not shall be taken even that which they have" — 
Matthew . . . reaction . . . equilibrium . . . molecular 
bond . . . inorganic . . . 





Robert F. O'Malley 
Chairman, Department of Chemistry 



CHEMISTRY 



Air chamber differential is explored by two students. 




157 




Professor Scully tells an observant student why "you can't afford the luxury of a 
mistake" in statistics. 



ECONOMICS 



demand, supply, equilibrium . . . Keynes, more Keynes, 
post-Keynes, anti Keynes? . . . income, interest, invest- 
ment . . . creeping inflation, inflation, hyperinflation, 
super-duper inflation . . . short term, long term, end of 
the term . . . imports and exports . . . balance of payments 
. . . allocating resources . . . probability, sampling, ogives 
. . . liquidity trap — Draino won't help . . . Samuelson, 
Slichter, Schumpeter . . . money, men, and machines . . . 



Rev. Robert J. McEwen, S.J. 
Chairman, Department of Economics 





Grad students join Professor Smith in an office discussion 
of the current gold shortage. 



CLASSICS 



amo, amas, amat . . . grammar, vocabulary, drili . . . 
Plato, Demosthenes . . . Golden Age, Silver Age, Stone 
Age . . . "stiffer upper Upper" . . . civilization . . . Roman 
. . . literary analysis . . . omnis Gallia in tres partes divisa 
est . . . Achilles heel . . . phalanx . . . "sic tu sapiens finire 
memento tristitiam vitaeque labores molli mero" . . . 
Quid agis-21 . . . horses oats . . . 




Rev. Leo P. McCauley, S.J. 
Chairman, Department of Classics 




Fellowship offers explained to interested students by Professor Foucre. 



MODERN LANGUAGES 



conjugation ... a trot . . . Chekov, Corneille, Cervantes, 
Confucius, Dante, Goethe . . . synopsis . . . Vive l'Alle- 
magne . . . language laboratory . . . western culture . . . 
rewind the tape . . . the throat is important . . . Romantic 
languages . . . "Say that again" . . . roll your tongue . . . 
put the earphones on . . . difficult conversation . . . don't 
think in English! . . . 



Rev. Joseph D. Gauthier, S.J. 
Chairman, Department of Modern Languages 






Daily bulletin is memorized by avid students. 

Dr. DiLoretto exemplifies the cheerful disposition of an 
efficient teacher. 




co-ed and liberal ed . . . Conant, B. Conant, B. Conant . . . 
"It's elementary, Watson" . . . trium and trivial . . . mobiles 
. . . regression, repression, projection . . . core curriculum 
planning . . . 6-2-4 or 5-3-4? . . . Gestalt, Spock, Dewey . . . 
objectives, motivation, evaluation . . . parellel play, sibling, 
rivalry . . . student teaching, seminar, ethics . . . the indi- 
vidual not the class . . . lesson plans . . . keep them busy . . . 

Two Education seniors discuss School of Education prob- 
lems with Fr. Donovan in a Faculty-Student meeting. 





Fred Cronin succeeds in explaining fundamentals of high school algebra to eager students during first semester's stint 
at student teaching. 



j 






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1 




The stained glass windows in Campion Hall's chapel depict 
the schools of the University in Christian symbolism. 



As a prospective teacher, the quest for learning goes un- 
daunted. 





Rev. John J. L. Collins, S.J. 
Chairman, Department of Financial Administration 



FINANCE 



working, capital, cash flow, depreciation . . . stocks and 
bonds . . . O. L. and T., 3-D, comprehensives . . . reserve 
bulletins, interest rates, war bonds . . . many facts, few 
figures, no dates . . . portfolios . . . case studies . . . pam- 
phlets, pamphlets, pamphlets . . . easy money . . . 
liquidation and creditor's rights . . . float ... get that 
gold back! . . . multiplier . . . 4% . . . ceiling rates . . . 
Federal Reserve System . . ."the market will fluctuate". . . 



Professor Lavoie reviews post-war, Federal Reserve, debt 
management policies. 



162 




Professor Greaney (left) explores the ex- 
isting job opportunities for B.C. stu- 
dents with a Civil Service Representa- 



B.C. students extend their musical in- 
terests to Symphony Hall and the Bos- 
ton Pops. 



FINE ARTS 



aesthetic experience . . . "this Madonna" . . . the three 
B's — Bach, Beethoven, and Berlioz? . . . civilization . . . 
impressionism, expressionism, and realism . . . Opus I 
. . . culture . . . Romanesque . . . transepts and biceps . . . 
objet d'art . . . fugue . . . Millet, Monet, Manet . . . Bee- 
thoven's 10th . . . Joe Green alias Giuseppe Verdi . . . 
beauty . . . panathenaic procession . . . polyphony, homo- 
phony, and cacophony . . . Frescoes . . . more slides and 
records . . . 



Ferdinand L. Rousseve 
Chairman, Department of Fine Arts 






Professor Richard H. Lund, (left), music instructor, answers a last- 
minute question of a Mozart-loving student. 

Gasson rotunda provides inspiration and beauty in painting 
of St. Ignatius. 




GOVERNMENT 



We the people . . . Republicans, Democrats, and Vege- 
tarians . . . you can't win them all . . . UN — NATO — 
SEATO . . . "in our last class" . . . Article I, Section III, 
Paragraph II . . . Communism vs. Capitalism . . . Checks 
and Balances . . . absolute monarchy is better than no 
monarchy at all . . . life, liberty and the pursuit of — 
Democracy, Demagogy, and Diogenes . . . 




Dr. O'Connor prepares for his map-drawing activi- 
ties in class. 

Dr. Dziewanowski in informal talk with student on Polish- 
Soviet relations. 





Paul T. Heffron, Chairman, Department of Government. 



HISTORY 



Nationalism, Imperialism, Colonialism . . . Four score 
and a good 5c cigar . . . changing horses . . . Marie 
Antoinette, Anne Boleyn, Mary Queen of Scots— heads 
of state . . . Pax Romana ... the king is dead, long live 
the king . . . Reformation, Renaissance, Reconstruction 
. . . Square Deal, Fair Deal, New Deal and Double Deal 
... oh, sweet History of life . . . 



Joseph T. Criscenti 
Chairman, Department of History 




ENGLISH 



Milton's Satan, Poe's Raven, Tennyson's Eagle, Bos- 
well's Johnson . . . Browning on Love, Donne on Death 
. . . Joseph Conrad . . . The Wrath of Achilles, The Free- 
dom of Whitman . . . Brobdingnaggs and Bookmen . . . 
Olde English, Middle English, Modern English ... a 
rose is a rose is a . . . brilliant! . . . Meeces, Mouses, and 
Muses . . . Benjy, Babbit, and Bottom . . . what? no time 
for Kerouac? . . . turn to Henry IV, Part I, Act III, 
Scene II, Line . . . English, an essay on man . . . 




Richard E. Hughes, Chairman, Department of English 



Dr. Hirsh is approached by Al Sullivan outside Campion on problems in Chaucer's Miller's Tale. 




165 




Professor Alfano indicates how the power of persuasion 
is brought out in advertisements. 

DISTRIBUTION 
, MANAGEMENT 

sales pitch . . . "don't count pedestrians carrying money 
bags" . . . fear, hate, love, adequacy, inner directiveness 
. . . practice interviews develop confidence . . . "ribbon 
developments" . . . beware of the sales manager . . . op- 
erating ratios and markup . . . have demand will supply . . . 

Gerald F. Price 
Chairman. Department of Distribution Management 





Professor D'Avella demonstrates to two of his students 
the proper use of the machinery in the Industrial Tech- 
niques Laboratory. 




INDUSTRIAL 
MANAGEMENT 

time and motion studies . . . routing, scheduling, dis- 
patching . . . therbligs . . . hurry up, hurry up, go faster 
. . . neck ties, lathes, scissors . . . yesterday we fired them 
all — so why not today? . . . interpreting blue prints . . . 
in at nine, out at three, four coffee breaks, two hours 
to eat . . . 



Justin C. Cronin 
Chairman, Department of Industrial Management 





Future Army officers of the United States develop their 
skill and accuracy on the rifle range. 

MILITARY SCIENCE 

tactical training . . . "follow me . . . oh, come on fellows" 
. . . pentomic . . . maps, compasses, aerial photos . . . 
marching, hiking, crawling . . . hep round . . . trajectory, 
cone of fire, beaten zone . . . D.M.S., P. M.S. . . . marks- 
man, sharpshooter, expert . . . mass confusion . . . Brasso, 
Kiwi . . . gold bar or gold brick . . . Class VI supply . . . 
commission and congratulations . . . "you're in the army 
now" . . . 




Lt. Col. John C. Wood, Jr., U.S.A. 
Chairman, Department of Military Science 



Standing: Capt. Edward P. Killion, Capt. Cyrus W. Bassett, Maj. Dermot P. Dalton, Capt. Michael Peck, Jr., Capt. Claude 
W. Cooper. Seated: Maj. John J. Rock, Lt. Col. John C. Wood, Jr., Lt. Col. Frank A. Merigold, and Maj. Howard E. Moore. 



:%> 




ps 





Long words and long hours are characteristic of the life of 
a Natural Science major. 



Rev. James W. Skehan, S.J. 
Chairman, Department of Geology 



NATURAL SCIENCE 

acids, bases and salts ... the left hand rule . . . D8 . . . 
"I am sorry fellows, but it doesn't work" . . . fusion, 
fission . . . Copernicus, Galileo, Wart . . . northern lights 
. . . atoms of the world — unite . . . "Our Mr. Sun" . . . 
quantum theory . . . balancing equations . . . this gas 
poisonous? — don't be foolish . . . cathode and anode 
. . . science can now turn gold into lead . . . electro- 
magnetic field . . . 

A student intently tests solutions during one of the fre- 
quent lab periods. 



GEOLOGY 




rock forming minerals . . . age, origin, and development 
. . . "rather spectacular" . . . twinning . . . fossils . . . field 
trips . . . Roxbury conglomerate . . . Hammond Pond 
Parkway . . . mountain building activity . . . Medford 
Dike . . . earthquake . . . extensive faulting ... 5 to 10 
billion . . . seismograph . . . Orogeny . . . volcanic . . . 
earth . . . crystal habit . . . Geophysics=Weston . . . 



The rock display, located in Devlin Hall, draws 
the attention of a "strata fan." 






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Leisure time affords an occasion for two co-eds to enjoy 
a cup of coffee with Mr. Sally. 




A graduate student is interpreting data for a computer 
that is used in mathematical ionospheric research for the 
Government. 



MATHEMATICS 



Fr. Walter Feeney, S.J., selects a few problems to be 
used in an impending quiz. 




derivatives . . . integrates with respect to "X" . . . use any 
method . . . that one doesn't excite me . . . "X" unknowns 
. . . revolution — mathematical of course . . . what desk 
calculator? ... in NFFDD . . . Gauss . . . binary system . . . 
"what — how dare you use that formula." . . . variables 
. . . plus or minus infinity . . . triangle . . . this is solved for 
all time . . . functions . . . the rest is simple algebra . . . 



Rev. Stanley J. Bezuszka, S.J. 

Chairman, Department of Mathematics 









NURSING 



clinical learning experience . . . psyche, soul and soma 
. . . shape up or ship out . . . saturated, unsaturated and 
polyunsaturated . . . therapies . . . high, hot and a heck 
of a lot . . . the catacombs . . . where are you going? love 
. . . esprit de corps . . . Nelson's "Birds, for the, pp. 1-1273" 
. . . you have feelings about this? . . . patient-centered 
approach . . . 



Two students enter the modern foyer of dishing 
Hall. 



Ann Wasilauskas typifies the concentrated study 
needed to meet the standards of the School of 

Nursing. 






••12 

6 7 8 9- 

I 13 14 15 16 

) 20 21 22 23 

~ 3 27 28 29 30 






| Madeline Druzdis is initiated into another phase of her 
chosen profession. 



<c 



^) 







Sara Welch consults the head nurse concerning 
chart entries. 




Although time is scarce nurses find time to visit 
St. Margaret's Chapel. 




Dr. Kenney lectures in Cushing Hall. 






Student nurse instructs new mothers in 
baby care. 




5* 



^ 



3 






i 



PHILOSOPHY 



agere sequitur esse . . . matter obfuscates knowledge . . . 
the million dollar infield; Fichte, Shelling, and Hegel . . . 
realism, idealism, and hylomorphism . . . "you'll never 
know" — who says you Kant . . . adequately considered 
. . . the true view . . . that which is cannot not be . . . the 
proximate end, the ultimate end . . . the living end??? . . . 
heresy hall . . . ergo . . . syllogisms, syllogisms, and more 
syllogisms . . . there's no ism like "Thomism" . . . 





Rev. Frederick J. Adelmann, S.J. 
Chairman, Department of Philosophy 



Philosophical speculation necessitates deep thought and a relaxed position, as 

Dr. Sheehan demonstrates. Fr Flanagan tells helpful studen t some of the final he just gave. 



172 





Rev. William G. Guindon, S.J. 
Chairman, Department of Physics 



PHYSICS 



hysteresis loop . . . gravitation . . . "make simplifying 
assumptions" ... the Michelson interferometer ... the 
energy is quantatized . . . fictitious generator . . . ether 
drag . . . virtual levels of the compound nucleus . . . 
mutual inductance . . . procession frequency . . . half 
life . . . Planck's constant . . . heat reservoir . . . magnetic 
and dynamic physicists . . . apply the boundary conditions 
. . . starting from Maxwell's equation . . . 




Physics student sees the light on Spectograph problem. 




"Notice how Listerine reduces 
the onion odor." 



173 




John D. Donovan 
Chairman, Department of Sociology 



SOCIOLOGY 




Gemeinschaft . . . pluralistic society . . . stereotype, social 
status, vertical social mobility . . . Ethnocentrism ... the 
aggregate . . . rites of passage . . . white collar crime . . . 
scapegoating . . . "The Organization Man" . . . hetero- 
geneity . . . filiocentric . . . sub — culture . . . sanctions . . . 
supra — scientific . . . 



Dr. Pare, Finbar O'Connell, and Walt Cuskey are teaching the 
psychology department's rat how to do the Skinner Box tango. 




Professor Williams is lost in thought during a free mo- 
ment between classes. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

the S-R-men . . . Dinklepaud and pidgeon pecking . . . 
Swami gets in the act . . . Zondi . . . pyknic on the grass 
. . . Florence Goodenough . . . power tests . . . psychoso- 
matic ... id, ego, super ego . . . the self . . . human engi- 
neering . . . conditioned reflex . . . skinner boxes and 
tread wheels ... the rats are hungry . . . there is no "real 
evidence" . . . frustrated needs . . . 



Rev. James F. Moynihan, S.J. 
Chairman, Department of Psychology 




Rev. James J. Casey, S.J., Chairman, Department of Theology. 



Yahweh . . . Exegetico-theological study . . . "an apple 
a day." . . . John XIII:34-35 . . . "The Life of Ricciotti" 
. . . Catholic Commentaries, scripture, and tradition, 
please comment . . . suffering servant . . . Sacrifice and 
Sacraments . . . "what color were St. Paul's sandals?" 
. . . Council of Trent . . . Cana . . . Tu es Petrus . . . Trans- 
substantiation . . . Mediatrix . . . efficacious and actual 
. . . follow Me . . . Exodus . . . Mystical Body . . . Amen . . . 

Fr. Devine checks footnotes on a student's term paper. 



THEOLOGY 



Fr. Carew enlightens a puzzled student concerning a hazy 
theological problem. 








Rev. Frederick J. Adelmann, S.J. 

Philosophy 






Phyllis V. Bromwell, R.N., M.Ed. 

Nursing 





Raymond J. Aheme, Ph.D. 

Finance 




John R. Berts, Ph.D. 

History 



Gary P. Brazier, Ph.D. 

Government 




,H/% 



M 



Richard A. Bruno, M.B.A., M.Ed. 

Accounting 







Vladimir N. Bandera, A.B. 

Economics 





Gerald G. Bilodeau, Ph.D. 

Mathematics 



Paul A. Boulanger, Ph.D. 

Modern Languages 



THE FACULTY OF 



Patricia M. Brewton, M.Ed. 

Nursing 




Florence T. Brickett, R.N., M.Ed. 

Nursing 




W. Dean Burnham, A.M. 

Government 



Robert J. Cahill, Ph.D. 

Modern Languages 










Joseph H. Chen, Ph.D. 

Physics 




Rev. Joseph P. Carew, S.J. 

Theol °gy William J. Carey, M.B.A. 





Rev. Jeremiah F. Coleman, S.J. 

Philosophy 




Robert L. Carovillano, Ph.D. 

Physics 





Rev. James J. Casey, S.J. 

Theology 









Rev. Richard D. Costello, S.J. 

History 



BOSTON COLLEGE 



Katharine C. Cotter, Ph.D. 

Education 




Joseph E. Devine, M.B.A. 

Distribution Management 



*™>* i 



Rev. David R. Cummiskey, S.J. 

Theology 



Raymond A. deRoover, Ph.D. 

Economics 




Rev. James J. Devlin, S.J. 

Physics 






Paul Devlin, M.B.A., C.P.A. 

Accounting 



S 




\ 



iik 






Stanley J. Dmohowski, 
M.B.A., C.P.A. 

Accounting 




177 




Joseph Doherty, S.J. 

Philosophy 




Robert I. Dolan, S.J. 

Philosophy 




Richard E. Downing, M.S. 

Physics 




Rev. Jeremiah J. Donovan, S.J. 

Theology 





Joseph L. Driscoll, D.Ed. 

Education 





Rev. Edward T. Douglas, S.J. 

Theology 




Rev. George L. Drury, S.J. 

Biology 



THE FACULTY OF 



Rev. James L. Duffy, S.J. 

Economics 



Rev. Raymond V. Dunn, S.J. 

Theology 





M. Kamil Dziewanowski, Ph.D. 
History 




Rev. Maurice V. Dullea, S.J. 

Theology 




Barbara A. Elbery, M.Ed. 

Education 




Rev. Alexander G. Duncan, S.J. 

Philosophy 




Benedetto Fabrizi, D.M.L. 

Modern Languages 








Harold H. Fagan, M.S., L.L.B. 

Chemistry 



t 




Joseph Figurito, D.M.L. 

Modern Languages 




Rev. Robert P. Flanagan, S.J. 

Philosophy 



Rev. Daniel J. Foley, S.J. 

Theology 



BOSTON COLLEGE 



Paul G. Foucre, A.M. 

Modern Languages 



Rev. George R. Fuir, S.J. 

Philosophy 







Madeleine D. Giguere, A.M. 

Sociology 



Wp ^ I 



George F. G. Grob, A.M. 

English 



V 




, / 





Walter J. Fimian, Jr., Ph.D. 

Biology 




Rev. Ernest B. Foley, S.J. 

Economics 



Philip F. Garity, A.B., L.L.B. 

Business Law 




Owen A. Hanley, A.M. 

Modern Languages 





Rev. William E. FitzGerald, S.J. 

Philosophy 



Rev. Martin P. Harney, S.J. 

History 





Vincent A. Harrington, 
M.B.A., L.L.B. 

Business Law 



Margaret J. Kenney, M.A. 

Mathematics 





Rev. Robert F. Healey, S.J. 

Classics 




Rev. Edmund J. Hogan, S.J. 

Theology 



Louis O. KattsofT, Ph.D. 

Mathematics 




Rev. John H. Kinnier, S.J. 

Physics 






Rev. Robert A. Hewitt, S.J. 

Theology 



Rev. John A. Hinchey, S.J. 

Philosophy 





Marion J. Jennings, Ph.D. 

Education 



Sister Mary Josephine, C.S.J. 

Education 



THE FACULTY OF 



Frederick D. Kellermann, Ph.D. 

Modern Languages 



Rev. John H. Kelly, S.J. 

Theology 




4i 



Pierre D. Lambert, Ph.D. 

Education 



f ) 

Ik. 




Rev. Gerard M. Landrey, S.J. 

Chemistry 






At 






Rev. William J. Leonard, S.J. 

Theology 





Rev. Francis A. Liuima, S.J. 

Physics 





Richard H. Lund, A.M. 

Fine Arts 




Rev. Arthur A. MacGillivray, S.J. 

English 



BOSTON COLLEGE 



Rev. Leonard P. Mahoney, S.J. 

History 



Rene J. Marcou, Ph.D. 

Mathematics 





Donald J. McCarthy, A.M. 

Philosophy 



John F. McCarthy, A.M. 

English 






*ik 



4 




Joseph A. Longo, A.M. 

English 

(f>5~ — > 



4/ J 



John L. Mahoney, Ph.D. 

English 



Joseph M. McCafferty, A.M. 

English 




Rev. John J. McCarthy, S.J. 
Physics 





Rev. Francis E. Low, S.J. 

Philosophy 



Timothy E. McCarthy, Ph.D. 

Chemistry 



t 1 

181 




Vincent A. McCrossen, Ph.D. 

Modern Languages 





Daniel L. McCue, Jr., A.M. 

English 




Rev. William C. Mclnnes, S.J. 

Distribution Management 



Francis J. McDermott, A.M. 

English 




Malcolm McLoud, A.M. 

Classics 




Rev. Albert F. McGuinn, S.J. 

Chemistry 




Rev. Paul J. McManus, S.J. 

Modern Languages 



THE FACULTY OF 



Paul M. Michaud, Ph.D. 

History 




Mk 



182 



Raymond T. McNally, Ph.D. 

History 





Rev. Francis P. Molloy, S.J. 

Philosophy 



'V 



2«*f\ 




Rev. John P. McNamara, S.J. 

Theology 




Patricia O'Connell, A.M. 

Modern Languages 




Rev. Walter J. Meagher, S.J. 

History 




Rev. John A. OCallaghan, S.J. 

English 




Am 



Thomas H. O'Connor, Ph.D. 

History 




Rev. Joseph P. O'Kane, S.J. 

Philosophy 





ill.. ^ ^ 



William P. Pare, Ph.D. 

Psychology 



Mary R. Petkauskas, R.N., A.M. 

Nursing 



BOSTON COLLEGE 



John J. Power, M.S. 

Physics 



Francis P. Powers, M.Ed. 

Education 




Rev. Leo O'Keefe, S.J. 

Philosophy 




Aida L. Perez, A.M. 

Modern Languages 



Rev. Leo A. Reilly, S.J. 

Philosophy 




Thomas J. Owens, Ph.D. 

Philosophy 



"*$**IWSk* «SvV, 



4 



4 t ^i 



Rev. Oswald A. Reinhalter, S.J. 

C/a.r,s/c.s 



Rev. John P. Rock, S.J. 

Philosophy 





Donald B. Sands, Ph.D. 
English 




Rev. Daniel J. Saunders, S.J. 

Theology 



M 



[83 




Rev. Leo A. Shea, S.J. 

Theology 




Rev. Thomas E. Shortell, S.J. 

Philosophy 




Rev. George F. Smith, S.J. 

Modern Languages 





Ernest A. Siciliano, Ph.D. 

Modern Languages 




Joseph A. Sullivan, Ph.D. 

Mathematics 




Clara M. Siggins, Ph.D. 

English 




Rev. Francis W. Sweeney, S.J. 

English 



Maurice K. Walsh, M.Ed. 

Mathematics 




Daniel C. Toumbakis, A.B. 

Government 





Norman J. Wells, Ph.D. 

Philosophy 




«**?* 



mm 



Rev. Charles B. Toomey, S.J. 

Philosophy 




Frederick E. White, Ph.D. 

Physics 



\ 

a 



Leon M. Vincent, M.S. 

Biology 




Frederick J. Zappala, M.B.A. 

Accounting 





Preparation for the next Honor's seminar is undertaken by a few 
School of Education Seniors. 



Guest speaker, Mr. James Goodsell, Assistant 
American News Editor of the Christian Science 
Monitor (far left), listens to a member of the 
CBA Honor section address a seminar group. 




HONORS PROGRAMS 
OF BOSTON COLLEGE 



The mystic, Mencius, is the topic of conversation amongst a group 
of A&S Honor students. 



185 



A 
C 
T 



V 



T 



E 
S 





Education is not just the lecture 
hall or laboratory, it is also 
the campus organizations which 
meet the many abilities and 
desires of the student. Throughout 
our college years, we join 
groups dedicated to all types of 
extra-curricular activity. 
Sports, publications, government, 
service — each appeals differently 
to various individuals, but it 
is through such activity that we 
learn of leadership and co- 
operation; here friendships are 
gained and experiences broadened. 





A 




V 



T 



E 
S 




f- 





Education is not just the lecture 
hall or laboratory, it is also 
the campus organizations which 
meet the many abilities and 
desires of the student. Throughout 
our college years, we join 
groups dedicated to all types of 
extra-curricular activity. 
Sports, publications, government, 
service — each appeals differently 
to various individuals, but it 
is through such activity that we 
learn of leadership and co- 
operation; here friendships are 
gained and experiences broadened. 



c 

A 
M 
P 
U 
S 

W 
I 

D 
E 

O 
R 
G 
A 
N 
I 

Z 

A 

T 

I 

O 
N 
S 




The Maroon and Gold — 58 strong (count them). 



The "sound of music" fills the air of Michie Stadium. 



BOSTON COLLEGE BAND 




Each year the name of Boston College is spread far 
and wide by her sons and daughters. This representa- 
tion is effected through many forms, but particularly 
through group activities and individual achievement, 
including athletic teams. The most consistent and best 
known B.C. diplomats are the bandsmen. Throughout 
the football season, the Boston College Band was the 
highlight of the half-time intermission. The perform- 
ances of the band, both in music and precision march- 
ing have kept many a fan remaining in his seat at 
half-time. 

At each of the hockey games this year, the Eagle 
band provided the same familiar repertoire to the de- 
light of the fans. Whether it was a swaying martial air 
or a swinging rhythm from Basin Street, it was always 
refreshing. Much credit is due to the band for their 
healthy support and rousing spirit. 

As Snooks Kelly said at his Silver Anniversary, 
"The fine support of Mr. Peter Siragusa and his group 
of musicians has been a consistent source of spark and 
incentive for hockey and all other athletic events." 



GLEE CLUB 



The Glee Club of a Catholic University such as Boston 
College must enrich and spread its own culture, the 
oldest culture in the world, namely that of the Church. 
This has been the aim of the director, Mr. C. Alexander 
Peloquin, since this leader of liturgical musicians ar- 
rived at B.C. six years ago. 

This year's repertoire and the calibre of presentation 
has once again enhanced the fine reputation of the 
group. Boston Herald music critic, Robert Taylor, 
gave testimony to this when he wrote, "Once one gets 
beyond what may be termed the elite circle — Harvard, 
Radcliffe, New England Conservatory, Boston College 
and about twenty other institutions throughout the 
nation — the standard of training and repertoire dis- 
integrates." 

The newly appointed and talented moderator of the 
Glee Club, Fr. Daniel J. Foley, S.J., was instrumental 
in providing the Glee Club with an excellent schedule 
this year. The seventy-five baritones and sopranos have 
engaged in joint concerts with Glee Clubs of Emanuel, 
Sacred Heart, Pembroke, Trinity, Albertus Magnus 
and the favorite climax, the annual Home Concert. 




Senior members of the Glee Club. 



Brilliant performances and numerous plaudits were characteristic of the 1960-61 Glee Club. 





The D.S. production of "Boy Meets Girl" was accorded many accolades at the Scranton Festival. 



A female thespian is awe struck by the realistic performance of 
Paul Donlon and Fr. Larkin, S.J. (Moderator). 



DRAMATIC SOCIETY 




Critics overwhelmed — Audiences thrilled — Another smash 
—Next week, EAST SCRANTON— The Boston College 
Dramatic Society, 1961, has taken its last curtain call under 
the direction of Rev. Joseph M. Larkin, S.J. 

From Shakespeare to Tennessee Williams, from Boston's 
Little Opera House to the Scranton University Playhouse, 
the D.S. has trodden the boards, the flies, the sets, and the 
spots. Kevin T. P. Byrne, President, has lost many pounds 
since his epic-making portrayal of Sir John Falstaff in 
Henry IV, Part V. Bill Ryan bought a new suit coat and 
tie after his triumph as the tattered Edgar in King Lear; and 
Gene Mulcahy purchased a fine pair of sun glasses following 
his success of the blinded Gloucester in Lear. 

The entirely feminine Maureen O'Brien will linger long 
in the minds of the audience of The Would-Be Invalid, for 



192 




Casting, frustration and iron deficiency anemia are omni- 
present before the "Big Nite." 



The "nouveaux riches . 



her portrayal of the entirely masculine Doctor Dwgon. 
Nor will the spirit of Paul Donlon's many roles, especially 
his irate cabby from Harvey, soon fade from memory. 

The D.S. is guilty of drama on and off the stage. What 
other campus organization established and operated (tax- 
free) a Japanese Tea House? What other group scored last 
in the Christmas Sing? — or gave a home to the most produc- 
tive mother cat in history? 

design of a new campus building. Its editorial staff achieves 
its goal in a spirit of awareness to all those who are in- 
terested in the advancement of Boston College. The Staff 
places special emphasis on questions directly pertaining 
to the overall well being of the university. 




193 




Keyholders Joe Tulimieri, Jack Keane, Hank Latorella, Jack McGonagle, Paul Flynn, Dick Allen, John 
Donovan, Kevin Donoghue, Dan Sullivan, and Paul Valzania pose with Fr. Robert Ferrick, S.J. (Moderator). 



GOLD KEY SOCIETY 




To Boston College the Gold Key Society more than 
adequately exemplifies its motto: "Service and Sacrifice." 
The Society encompasses for its domain the entire range of 
university activity. A Gold Key man may be found ushering 
at the many campus athletic events or officially greeting a 
guest of the College. Its success in fostering student spirit 
is well known. Many hours are spent by members of the 
Gold Key in presenting the "Big Game" rallies and float 
parades. 



For the past 25 years the Gold Key has been responsible for the many 
successful football rallies held at B.C. 



The Society plays a major role in many other facets of 
Boston College life. The Freshman Orientation Program, 
the Alumni Skating Show, the Science Fair and several 
other special events are largely managed by the all male 
Key-holders. In the social vein, the Key presents the annual 
kick off Dance and assists at many university affairs. 

A gold key is awarded to, and prized by, those Juniors and 
Seniors who meet the vigorous demands of the Society. The 
members are examples of the college spirit and the ideals of 
service and sacrifice that contribute to the greatness of our 
university. 



Father Ferrick, moderator, tells President Paul Flynn one 
of his "educated" jokes. 




But usher, that's my seat ! 




The morning after the night before 



195 




Editor-in-Chief, John Gallivan. 



A sea of newsprint held over the cafeteria lunch tables on 
Friday is the result of long hours of work the previous 
Tuesday night. The Heights is Boston College's most widely 
read publication. Its eight pages are devoted to everything 
that is B.C.; news, sports and features. Every major activity, 
lecture or public appearance is assured attendance by one 
of The Heights reporters. 

For those at Boston College it serves as one of the chief 
sources of campus information. For the outsider it is a 
mirror of a growing Catholic university. Students use. its 
pages to voice opinions, criticisms and judgements of al- 
most anything, from international politics to the architectural 
design of a new campus building. Its editorial staff achieves 
its goal in a spirit of awareness to all those who are in- 
terested in the advancement of Boston College. The Staff 
places special emphasis on questions directly pertaining 
to the overall well being of the university. 



'The Triumvirate," Marty Nolan, Associate Editor, John Gallivan, Editor-in-Chief, Ed Hurley, Managing Editor. 



196 





W/a 



>BACK ATI 



"The Untouchables"— Marty Nolan, John Cummings, Gene DeVita, Joe Scalley, Mike Murray, John 
Gallivan, Roddy Cannon and Ed Hurley. 



THE HEIGHTS 



®he ajetgljiB 



Student newspaper c 
university on Friday d\ 
HEIGHTS, Student Acti 



f Boston College, published by and for the students of the 
ring the academic year. Address all correspondence to THE 
/ities Building, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Mass. Entered 
the Boston Post Office. Represented by National Advertising 



Deadline for news releases, signed opinr 

of the Tuesday preceding publication, unless 

Telephone DE 2-3200, ext. 391. 392. 



and advertising material 



Ed 

NEWS EDITORS 
John T. Cummings, '61 
Gene DeVita, '61 
FEATURES EDITORS 
J. Roddy Ca 
E. V. McDoi 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
John Gallivan, '61 
MANAGING EDITOR 
rd D. Hurley, Jr. '6 



ASST. EDITORS: 

News: Ricl 

Sports: Tor 

News Staff: Mich: 

Barton, John Donahus 
Claudia Higgins. Ne 
Cathy M = zzia, Kathl 
John Cunningham, Hel 



ough, '62 

Be: 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

R. Michael Murray, '61 

CIRCULATION MANAGER 

Thomas J. Regan, '62 



1 A'Hea 
,ahue, h 



Sports Staff: Vinnie Clayton, Jerry F: 

Dick Mulroney, Mark Mulvoy, Jerr' 

Features Staff: Peter Dee, Richard Dc 
Orley, George MacDonald, Tames W 
Higgins, Joseph Judicini, Vin Mol 



e, Christopher Lee, Jack Sweeney. 

n. Edmund Duffy, John Higgins, Peter K 
k Donovan, Bill Flynn, Frank Gallagher, Lo 
Hurlev, Peter Hurley, Robert Jagolinzer, 
i McAloon, Bernard McGovern, Richard Ray, 
y, John Connolly 



urphy, Colin 
ise Gallahue, 
lavid Kelly, 
Bill Reilly, 



11, Joe Gergen, Bob Sheffield, Sandy Bissonette, 
O'Sullivan, Mary Lou Scalley. Pete Feeney. 
ahue, Pat Brosnan, Louis F. O'Malley, Ray 
ers, Isabel Howe, Francesco Scaduto, George 
Heffe 



jl Sla 



BusineYs Staff: Richard Bond, John Cunio. James McCour 

Typists: Laraine Geswell. Mary Driscoll, Barbara Gildea, Dianne Glennon, Jane 

gallen, Lin Scala, Karina Solano, Joan Tyldesley, Leona Leonard. 
Photographers: Greg Burke, Mike Kane, Ed Spain, J. B., Claudia Higgins. 
Faculty Moderators: Fr. William J. Leonard, S.J.; Mr. Joseph E. Doherty, S.J. 



Kil- 




HEIGHTS photographer Greg Burke explains the intricacies of a 
Speed-Graphic to a fair damsel. 



197 



CAMPUS COUNCIL 



Many organizations, whether they be part of the American 
social structure or be listed in our own student handbooks, 
devise standards and objectives fit for the idealism of super- 
humans, while only a few arrive near the point of attain- 
ment. This has undoubtedly been the folly and consequent 
demise of numerous potential groups. A classic example of 
the opposite can be recognized in the Campus Council at 
Boston College. Since the recent initiation of this hier- 
archical body into student government, each year has passed 
with the fulfillment of several significant contributions to 
the university. 

The accomplishments of the 1961 Campus Council were 
highlighted by the establishment of a S1000 scholarship for 
a Junior to spend a year's study abroad. With the arrival of 
the foreign student, council members positioned themselves 
as hosts and friends. The treasury of the Campus Council, 
dilated by Invitation Mixers, has benevolently aided many 
other organizations in financial matters. The climax to the 
year's activity was the presentation of the annual Out- 
standing Faculty Member and Alumnus Awards. 




A cake sale for the University of Formosa filled many stomachs for 
a worthy cause. 



Campus Council members Joan Buckley, Paul McNealy, John Keane (Chairman), Carol Dorey, Alex Urbanowicz and Robert Whitten 
meet with Fr. Michael Walsh, S.J., President of Boston College. 



- ? '- 




p* 




SUB TURRI 





199 




SUB TURRI STAFF— Seated: Nancy Bonazzoli (Patrons Manager); Robert Lubold (Associate Editor); Anne Kicin (Senior Editor); John 
Altieri (Managing Editor); Albert Sullivan (Editor-in-Chief); John Hehir (Business Manager); John Mullen (Photography Editor); Christopher 
Canavan and Robert Kelly (Sports Editors); and Barbara Powers (Associate Editor). Standing: John Ahearn (Academic Editor); Thomas 
Farrell (Sales Manager); Clement Kelly (Layout Editor); Kevin Collins (Senior Editor); Herbert Coughlan (Features Editor); Robert Kenny 
(Activities Editor); Edmund Madden (Literary Editor); David Dugan (Activities Editor); and James Bishop (Accountant). 



200 




OUR ACHIEVEMENT 



Every year about the middle of May or soon thereafter, 
a four hundred page "annual" suddenly appears from out 
of the dark confines of the S.A.B. This treatise, composed 
of pictures, copy, captions and art work, is the combined 
effort of over seventy people who can be identified by their 
frantic meanderings about the campus in an attempt to 
meet deadlines, post-deadlines and ultimate deadlines. 

As the warm beams of Indian Summer spread over the 
Heights, work on the 1961 Sub Turri began. Hard to 
come by class lists were seized, football games were covered 
and even our contingent of "coffee clotch" Seniors found 
time to leave Lyons Cafeteria and pose for their Senior 
pictures. 

The icy blasts of December found the Activities Editors 
pursuing moderators and club presidents back and forth 
from class to residence to entice them into organizing their 
organizations for a picture. The cumbersome snow dunes of 
February shattered the calm deliberate planning of the 1961 
yearbook. It seemed as though the elements winked at our 
deadlines and the printer burned the lines from Buffalo to 
Boston. Forgotten meals, 3 A.M. typing stints, blown fuses, 
makeup exams, argumentation and exhortation became the 
vogue. With the March winds came an impassioned plea 
from the Editor-in-Chief to forsake the St. Patrick's week- 
end jaunt to New York City and engage in an immediate 
"crash program." Out of all this complication erupted a 
unity — the 1961 Sub Turri. 

Each edition of a yearbook attempts to expose that 
fundamental "something" which is the essence of its respec- 
tive class. The staff of this Year's SUB TURRI has depicted 
the class of 1961 and Boston College in terms of the classic 
definition, of beauty, "unity amidst variety." 

The diverse activities of the Senior Class encompass all 
the interests and endeavours of its members, while the 
oneness emanates from each member being an integral part 
of Boston College. The life of the Senior is described in all 
its facets, whether it is within the university or outside. The 
novelty of the reproduction is its informality of presentation. 
Unlike preceding yearbooks, the 1961 Sub Turri provides a 
reservoir of memories void of appended gloss and sophisti- 
cation. The Staff has tried to recap all those incidents which 
will elicit either a fond remembrance or a rejuvenating smile. 



201 




The Editorial Staff: a rare occasion! 






: ! 


Igfittk. : "~* 






j %^ 



'Now, let's check for middle initials.' 





The Business Staff: a close knit group. 




A deadline discussion evokes wry smiles. 




1 ? 



Editor-in-Chief 
Albert W. Sullivan 



Managing Editor, John A. Altieri 



Business Manager, John J. Hehir, Jr. 



Academic Editor 
John Ahearn 

Features Editor 
Herbert Coughlan 

Senior Editors 

Anne Kicin 

Kevin Collins 

Frederick Haynes 

Activities Editors 
Robert Kenny 
David Dugan 

Sports Editors 

Christopher Canavan 

Robert Kelly 



Photography Editor 
John Mullen 

Moderator 
Rev. Raymond V. Dunn, S.J. 

Copy Editor 
Edmund T. Madden 

Art Editor 
Jan H. Hermans 

Layout Editor 
Clement Kelly 

Sales Manager 
Thomas Farrell 

Advertising Manager 
Robert Derba 



Patrons Manager 
Nancy Bonazzoli 

Accountant 
James Bishop 

Social Chairman 
David Melville 

Associate Editors 
Barbara Powers 
Robert Lubold 

Theresa Reardon 
Shirley McGee 

Special Assistants 

Edward O'Connor 

Francis Keenan 



Photography Staff— Charles Curto, Howard Mann. 

Production Staff—Mario DiBelardino, Martin Nolan, Philip Davis, Peter McKay, John Butler, Joanne O'Brien, Elizabeth Sheehan, 
Gerald Walsh, Roger Sweeney, Gerald McKenna, Walter Shields, Joseph Sullivan, James Zyntell, Mary Turbini, Henry Egan,' 
Arthur Milano. 

Advertising Staff— Frederick Sullivan, Norman Towle, William Kingsbury, Edmund Meara. 

Section Collectors— (CBA) Francis Fiorentino, James Buckley, John Lewis, John Provasoli, Robert Chaisson, Peter Barry, Robert 

Sullivan, David Melville, (A&S) Charles Glasshauser, Richard Straub, Michael Duffy, Francis Gallishaw, John Cinella, Thomas 

Kilcoyne, Kevin Donoghue, Donald Celata, Barry Connelly, (Educ.) Gerard Miller, Maureen Donnellan, Anne Rouse. 

Clerical Staff— Carol Ponzo, Elizabeth Wallace, Shirley Holmes, Marion McDonnell, Ann Lynch, Rita Semrad. 



203 




Albert Sullivan, Editor-in-Chief 



John Hehir, Business Manager 





John Altieri, Managing Editor 




204 




o» i & _ A i ' 








ACADEMIC AND 

GENERAL INTEREST 

ORGANIZATIONS 





ACCOUNTING 
ACADEMY 




ECONOMICS ACADEMY 



... to study basic economic problems by means of panels, 
forums and discussion . . . inquiry into today's semi-universal 
economic dilemma is achieved through lectures by eminent 
writers, teachers, and political figures ... in past years, 
many of the most notable speakers on campus have come 
to us courtesy of the Economics Academy. 



... to explain the various fields in which accounting may 
be applied . . . through guest speakers a knowledge of the 
various accounting systems is acquired . . . the culmination 
of the Academy's activity is found in the annual presenta- 
tion of the Haskins and Sells Award to the top accounting 
student in the university. 




^Z 



j*2\ 




206 





... to acclimate the individual student to the contem- 
porary business world . . . personal research into such re- 
lated fields as the money market and the stock market is 
encouraged . . . periodic guided tours of local financial in- 
stitutions, especially the safari to Wall Street, are enjoyed 
by all. 



FINANCE CLUB 




ACADEMY FOR 

MARKETING EXECUTIVES 



... to provide majors in Distribution Management with 
an industry-orientated program . . . with the assistance of 
professional consultants and the enlightenment of career 
panels . . . Each year, the Academy participates in the Boston 
Conference on Distribution and the local A.M. A. Col- 
legiate Chapter meetings. 



207 



SOCIETY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF MANAGEMENT 




. . . dedicated to the fostering and advancing of mana- 
gerial policies and principles . . . post-graduate membership 
affords a valuable interchange of ideas ... a high national 
ranking places the Boston College chapter of this society 
amongst the most successful on campus. 



TOASTMASTER'S CIRCLE 





s 



... to cultivate the art of articulate delivery . . . with dis- 
cussions centering on subjects of current interest ... an 
emphasis on "what you say" as well as "how you say it" 
breeds freedom of opinion and confidence in one's speaking 
ability. 



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C. B. A. 

DEBATING 

SOCIETY 



... to develop the young student with the powers of 
poise and ability in speaking . . . especially intended for 
Freshmen and Sophomores . . . under the fine direction of 
Mr. Joseph McCafferty. 



B. C DEBATING SOCIETY 



... to cultivate ability in the art of argumentation and 
oral presentation . . . the 1960-61 Renaissance of the "Ful- 
ton" has resulted in Boston College's reinstatement as a 
highly respected and formidable opponent in debating 
circles. 




BELLARMINE LAW 
AND GOVERNMENT 



... to present to its members current views of contem- 
porary authorities in government and law ... in order to 
create an awareness in the student body of national and 
local problems . . . through lectures and informal talks by 
representatives of public administration, politics, law, and 
the civil service. 







FOREIGN 
TRADE CLUB 



... to inculcate a wider knowledge of present trends in 
international trade ... to understand the theories and prac- 
tical reasoning behind such phenomenon as gold flows and 
the international division of labor . . . the informality of the 
forums encourage the expression of student views and 
insights. 



210 



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Former Democratic National Chairman, Paul Butler 




Former President, Harry Truman 
Senatorial Candidate, Thomas O'Connor 




Governor of Massachusetts, John Volpe 





PUBLIC 

AFFAIRS FORUM 



... to enable undergraduate students to learn about con- 
temporary trends in various fields of endeavor . . . the Public 
Affairs Forum has presented such distinguished speakers 
as former president, Harry S. Truman; Senator Leverett 
Saltonstall, and former chairman of the National Demo- 
cratic Party, Paul Butler . . . accolades are in order to Fr. 
Robert McEwen, S.J. for this fine series. 



German Ambassador, Wilhelm Grewe 




WORLD 

RELATIONS LEAGUE 



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... to investigate international policy by means of 
discussions and lecturers ... an opportunity for 
interested students to avail themselves of pertinent 
information on foreign relations ... the visits of 
Congressmen and foreign consulate officials were 
the highlights of the 60-61 program. 



YOUNG 

DEMOCRATIC^' CLUB 



sm ^1« 






2fe^ 




... the essentials of any philosophy must take root 
and grow within the structure of the individual . . . 
the Young Democrats' Club is well known at our 
college as a group which strives toward easing the 
political burden of their fellow students. 



212 




ENGLISH ACADEMY 
A& S 



... to develop critical acumen toward English 
literature . . . members manifest genuine enthusiasm 
and feeling for literary works, classical and. modern 
. . . prominent young writers and critics share views 
with the students in the Young Poet Series. 



>M CO 





ENGLISH ACADEMY 
OF THE SCHOOL 
OF NURSING 



... to further develop within the student an under- 
standing and appreciation of literature and its re- 
lation to the culture and philosophy of an educated 
society . . . the most important aspect of member- 
ship in this Academy is a valid, critical analysis by 
which the student may judge literary works of art. 




WRITERS CLUB OF THE 
SCHOOL OF 

EDUCATION /^"^ 




... to foster originality, creativity and enthusiasm for 
composition . . . under the able direction of Father 
Daniel Dwyer, S.J., works are considered, imitated, cor- 
rected and evaluated . . . with emphasis on contemporary 
literature and drama as a source of emulation. 





AQUINAS CIRCLE 



... to broaden and deepen philosophical insight . . . 
emphasis is placed on those philosophers outside of the 
scholastic school of thought . . . considerations range 
from Astronomy to Phenomenology to Existentialism 
. . . the Circle excludes officers and social events from its 
interests. 



214 





ST. MARK'S 
ACADEMY 



... to develop leadership ... to create a closer relation- 
ship among its members ... to present to the members 
instructive and entertaining programs ... in order to 
promote interest in the business world and a business 
teaching career. 




WOMEN'S 
RECREATION 
ASSOCIATION 



... to provide an official social and athletic organization 
for women in the School of Education . . . through the 
sponsoring of basketball, archery, and rifle competition 
... ski weekends afford a welcome break from intellectual 
pursuits. 




CHEMICAL SOCIETY 





... to present information to all students who have 
an interest in chemistry . . . through bi-monthly 
meetings, evening meetings, an informal smoker, 
or a pertinent film . . . each of which is most stimu- 
lating to those who attend. 



MENDEL CLUB 



... to advance a spirit of inquiry and research in 
the varied fields of science . . . to present sympo- 
siums on biological problems at intercollegiate sci- 
ence conferences . . . with the realization of the 
increasing importance of progress in science, the 
Mendel Club continually aims towards the develop- 
ment of original contemplation, experimentation 
and evaluation in the scientific method. 



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216 




PSYCHOLOGY CLUB 



... to promote interest in experimental, clinical, 
industrial, and social psychology . . . through dis- 
cussions comes insight into a wide area of human 
behavior . . . through research, films, and volunteer 
service at various mental hospitals, the student be- 
comes more aware of the importance and effective- 
ness of modern psychology. 




RICO MATH CLUB 



... to develop understanding in significant develop- 
ments in the ever-expanding field of mathematics 
. . . through lectures, combined with practical dem- 
onstrations . . . the student becomes more aware of 
the importance and effectiveness of modern mathe- 
matics. 




!17 




HISTORICAL 
SOCIETY 




... to discuss, study and interpret historical events 
. . . from ancient to modern times . . . through bi- 
monthly meetings . . . consisting of lectures, movies, 
and informal discussions ... an interest to all stu- 
dents from the four corners of the campus. 



PHI ALPHA THETA 




... to promote the study of history on an academic 
plane . . . selected students engage in research and 
discussion under the direction of various faculty 
members . . . this honor society provides its mem- 
bers with the opportunity to meet and speak with 
noted historians. 




218 




COSMOS 



... to represent scientific and literary achievement 
. . . through the results of personal scientific re- 
search by the student body . . . ranging fnorn majors 
in Physics to Psychology . . . truly a journal of 
specific information on subjects of universal in- 
terest. 







^r- 



HUMANITIES 



/V 






\l 



... to publish essays of historical interest in the 
humanistic disciplines . . . with a sense of humor 
and an imaginative approach to layout and design 
. . . thereby creating a fresh and effective setting for 
its articles. 




219 




STYLUS 



... to cultivate literary ability commensurate to 
university standards ... a publication featuring 
ingenuity and diversity in writing . . . produced 
quarterly, the Stylus fashions novelty in cover and 
illustrations ... the gifted staff also directs atten- 
tion to poetry and fiction. 




JOURNAL OF BUSINESS 



... a professional publication designed to bring the 
business world closer to the student . . . feature 
articles place attention on business trends and 
studies . . . staff members represent all major fields 
of interest . . . pride of the College of Business 
Administration. 




220 





ITALIAN ACADEMY 



... to stimulate interest in Italian culture and tradi- 
tion . . . Italian opera, art, and folklore provide 
materials for appreciation . . . visits from members 
of the Italian Consulate, Radio Free Europe, and 
exchange students . . . climactic spaghetti party 
where the culture is consumed enthusiasticamente. 




GERMAN ACADEMY 



... to instill in the student a knowledge and a 
facility of the language . . . from German culture, 
people, their literature and history . . . stimulating 
in its members a keeness of perception and judg- 
ment in regard to Germany's problems. 







SPANISH ACADEMY 



... to enlighten students on the various aspects of Spanish 
life . . . and in the language of that country ... a cultural 
as well as an intellectual interest . . . inducing the pursuit 
of additional knowledge by the members into a society 
other than their own. 



LE CERCLE FRANCAIS 



... to acclimate the student to the French mores and 
traditions . . . panels, exchange students and guest lec- 
turers achieve this goal through discussion in French . . . 
materials considered range from modern philosophical 
and political influences to French art, literature, and 
drama. 




222 





. . . to enable the loyal "rooster-boosters" from "Little 
Rhodie" to congregate for dinners, beach parties, and a 
spring dance ... to re-adjust the incoming Rhode 
Islanders to a new environment . . . many lasting and 
stolid friendships are initiated under this club's auspices. 



NEW YORK CLUB 



. . . to provide students from the Empire State with a 
common ground of interest — home . . . transportation 
to and from home . . . social functions on campus and 
in the "Big City." 




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The University is blessed with not one, but three radio 
stations . . . WVBC, the official organ of the school, is 
beamed to dorm students . . . MARS (Military Affiliated 
Radio System) network is used to handle emergency 
military messages . . . WIPR, gives the "ham" an oppor- 
tunity to qualify and pass novice radio-operator exams. 




WIPR 




BOSTON 
RADIO 




1 V 




W V B C 




COLLEGE 
STATIONS 



MARS 




ALPHA KAPPA PSI 





UMM/f. 



M. 



... to incorporate in its members a knowledge of 
business theories and techniques and enable a closer 
relationship with the business world . . . membership 
in Delta Eta Chapter can be attained only by those 
who excel in scholarship and service to the University. 




226 



DELTA SIGMA PI 






... to provide closer linkage between the commercial 
world and students of commerce ... to cultivate a 
high standard of business ethics and culture . . . mem- 
bers become brothers after extensive screening and a 
pledge period ... a professional business fraternity 
which demands of its members sincerity, willingness, 
and competency. 



227 




... to instill "esprit de corps" among advanced ROTC 
students ... to supplement classroom instruction and to 
develop the character of future officers ... to manifest a 
keen sense of honor and duty toward our country. 




CADET W 

OFFICERS' ft 



CLUB 



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B. C RIFLE 
TEAM 



Designed to develop sportsmanlike attitudes among its 
members ... to teach proper handling and use of fire- 
arms. The team faces competition regularly from inter- 
collegiate rifle squads. 




228 








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LEWIS DRILL TEAM 



... to bring to Boston College and to the Army an honor 
in keeping with our motto, "Ever to Excel." The pride 
of the ROTC appears at such annual events as the New 
York St. Patrick's Day Parade and the Parade of Prin- 
cesses at Washington, D.C., and thus acts as a goodwill 
emissary of the University. 





229 




KAPPA PI 



... to afford "brothers" the opportunity to dis- 
cuss current topics in education ... to assist the 
School of Education administration in the con- 
ducting of banquets, seminars, and lectures . . . 
this fraternity is rapidly growing out of its infant 
stages and shows promise of becoming an in- 
tegral part of the School of Education. 



to 





SEMPER FIDELIS 



. . . to promote student interest in the Marine Corps 
Officers Program ... to continue the reputable "esprit 
de corps" amongst its veterans. This society prides itself 
on being the largest college chapter in the United States. 



230 




BLESSED OLIVER PLUNKETT SOCIETY 



... to foster a general appreciation and understanding of 
Gaelic culture, history, and literature . . . periodic meet- 
ings conducted in a light and congenial atmosphere pro- 
vide the setting for lively Ceilidhes, Irish jigs, song fests 
and a tete-a-tete over Irish bread and tea ... a tip of the 
Tam-O-Shanter to Fr. Martin P. Harney, S.J., founder 
and moderator, for the success and popularity of the 
society. 





231 



ROD & GUN CLUB 



... to promote the ideals of safety, conservation and good 
sportsmanship . . . deep sea fishing, Skeet and Turkey 
shoots afford outdoor practice in the use of firearms and 
fishing reels. All members gain necessary knowledge of 
international fish and game laws. 






INTRAMURALS 



... to afford all students of the University an oppor- 
tunity to participate in sports ... to strengthen the body 
as well as the mind . . . the University provides the inter- 
ested student with a varied assortment of activities in- 
cluding handball, squash, softball, and touch football . . . 
In all, a well-balanced program which utilizes the finest 
in plant equipment. 




232 




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234 



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GOVERNMENTS 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

SODALITIES 




RESIDENT 

STUDENTS' COUNCIL 



The Resident Student's Council is a student govern- 
ment organization which represents the more than one 
thousand students who live in the dormitories. Its mem- 
bers serve their fellow students by arranging dances and 
other social activities and by serving as a sounding 
board for suggestions to improve dorm life. 

The physical structure of the Dormitory Council con- 
sists in floor representation within a hall and hall repre- 
sentation within the Council. 

Perhaps the most essential work of the Council is the 
Freshman Orientation Program. It is organized with the 
purpose of assisting the newcomer to adjusting himself 
to dormitory life at Boston College. 



WOMEN'S COUNCIL OF EDUCATION 



The "girl-fridays" of the School of Education belong 
to a small group entitled Women's Council. The primary 
function of this board is to assist and advise the Dean of 
Women on problems and policies pertinent to women 
students. The physical structure of the Council consists 
of two members elected annually from each class. It is 



through the special effort of these girls that the adminis- 
trative faculty is able to know the attitudes and feelings 
of the female students with regard to school and its many 
activities. Suggestions are weighed and solutions are 
arrived at more effectively. 





SENIOR CLASS COUNCIL 



The Senior Class Council constitutes the governing 
body for the entire senior class. It is composed of four 
senior class officers from the College of Arts and Sciences, 
College of Business Administration, School of Education 
and the Basic Nursing School. These sixteen officers elect 
a President, Vice-President, Secretary and Treasurer. 



The purpose of the Senior Class Council is to serve as 
leaders of the senior class in directing and facilitating 
student activities on an intellectual, social and spiritual 
level. Also it represents the student community in working 
with the faculty and administration for the promotion 
of college and university interests. 




SIENA SOCIETY 



The Siena Society is an honors group, reserved for the 
members of the Senior class of the B.C. School of Nursing 
who have achieved a high scholastic standing and who 
have been most active in university activities, publications 
and clubs during their first five semesters. Selection is by 
application, examination of the student's record, and an 



interview by present members. 

The Siena Society is named in honor of St. Catherine 
of Siena, Patroness of Nurses, and it is felt that her ex- 
ample will help the members incorporate the ideal of 
"Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam" into their patients' cases 
and in their everyday lives. 



237 




A&S 



STUDENT 



The purpose of the Student Senate, as the highest 
official representative of the undergraduate student body 
of the University, is to provide a channel by which the 
undergraduates may cooperate with and serve the ad- 
ministration for the betterment of the students and the 
University. 

The members of the individual Senates are the four 
elected class officers of each of the four classes. Repre- 




EVENING 



238 



C B A 




SENATES 



senting the students, senators bring complaints and sug- 
gestions to the attention of College officials. When action 
is taken by the senate, it is the responsibility of the 
senators to publicize such legislation. 

Another function of the senate is to sponsor such social 
affairs as smokers, teas and other programs of a scholastic 
and social nature. 




EDUCATION 



239 



GRADUATE 
NURSES' 

STUDENT- 
FACULTY 

ORGANIZATION 




This association is composed of all members of the 
graduate nurse student body plus faculty members. Its 
aims are diversified and varied to include all phases of 
collegiate life for the graduate nurse. 

The student-faculty organization was established to 
maintain high standards of cooperation and loyalty to 
school and university. It could be a stepping stone to 



leadership in community life by preparing the student to 
meet the problems of school and adult life. It sets a high 
standard of citizenship through active committees and 
boards. But most of all this organization was ordained 
to encourage and support all forms of student activities. 
By participating in these committees the graduates make 
college life more meaningful to themselves. 



The Basic Nurses' Student-Faculty Organization of 
the School of Nursing provides an opportunity for the 
student body to express opinions on student matters and 
govern themselves in a democratic manner. Its aims are 
to foster a closer union between students and faculty, to 
promote leadership and school spirit among students, to 
maintain school traditions and to contribute to the ef- 
ficiency of school functions. 



Within the organization there exist a number of com- 
mittees which perform such functions as planning social 
activities, accepting nominations and planning elections 
to class and organization offices, and raising funds for 
organization activities. 




BASIC NURSES' 
STUDENT- 
FACULTY 
ORGANIZATION 



ALPHA 



& 



OMEGA 



The Alpha and Omega Society, the official honor so- 
ciety of the School of Education, was established in 1955 
for the purpose of identifying and gathering together 
those students in the school who had manifested by their 
academic achievement, character and service a persistent 
effort to fulfill the motto of the University "Ever to 
Excel," for the enhancement of the cultural development 
of its membership and of the university. 

Following the tradition established in 1955, each 
October the Alpha Omega Key dance has been held, for 
the formal presentation of keys to members by the Very 
Rev. Michael Walsh, S.J. 




ALPHA SIGMA NU 



Contrary to popular opinion and traditional require- 
ment, Alpha Sigma Nu, the Jesuit Honor Society, does 
not choose its members on the basis of scholastic achieve- 
ment alone. Each member is judged by the standards of 
scholarship, service and loyalty. 

In short, Alpha Sigma Nu selects men who are leaders. 
It is interesting to note that the membership of this 
veritable honor group constitutes only 1% of the senior 
class. 




241 




OMICRON 



CHI 



EPSILON 



The College of Arts and Sciences and the College of 
Business Administration combine in offering the superior 
students in the major field of economics a common field 
of interest through this society. 

The prospective member is judged on the basis of his 
fidelity to the ideals of economics as well as his scholastic 
and extracurricular rating. Each year a delegation from 
the Boston College Chapter of this honor society is sent 
to the national convention of the society at New York 
University. 



BETA GAMMA SIGMA 



Beta Gamma Sigma was inaugurated at Boston College 
in 1957. It is the only national honor fraternity recognized 
by the Association of American Collegiate Schools of 
Business Administration. Membership is achieved by stiff 
academic competition and limited to those students who 
are in the upper 10% of their Senior Class. Initiation into 
the society represents the highest recognition a student 
of commerce can attain. 




242 



SIGMA PI SIGMA 



Sigma Pi Sigma has the distinction of being the only 
national physics honor society. The chapters receive into 
membership undergraduate and graduate physics stu- 
dents, faculty members, and a few others in closely re- 
lated fields, irrespective of their membership in other 
organizations. 

Specific attempts are made to avoid any implications 
relating the society to a "fraternity". Sigma Pi Sigma 
exists as it was founded by the students. 





ORDER OF 
THE CROSS 
& CROWN 



Members of the College of Arts and Sciences who have 
distinguished themselves through selfless participation in 
University activities while maintaining an exemplary 
record of scholastic achievement are selected at the end 
of their Junior year to join this society. Membership is 
attained via an interview by present participants and ap- 
proval of the College administration. 

Induction into this society is one of the highest honors 
the College confers in acknowledgment of achievement 
and in gratitude for fidelity. 



243 



mi 



HI 





GRADUATE NURSES' 
SODALITY 



MEN'S SODALITY 



... to Christ through Mary . . . reverent devotion and 
filial love of the Mother of God by personal sanctifica- 
tion as well as active co-operation with any work that is 
God's . . . activities concentrate on devotion of the rosary, 
teaching of Christian Doctrine in the parishes and 
working with handicapped and underprivileged children. 



244 




I 09 

if' I ^ 



WOMEN'S 
SODALITY 




245 



s 



E 



N 



O 



R 



S 





To each of us Boston College has 
presented a different character. 
Her influences, her ideals and 
her disciplines become part of us 
as our scholastic careers draw 
to a close. We are now her 
sons and daughters enriched with 
all her natural beauty, her 
spirit and truth. We have attained 
an end unto an end, and as we 
leave Alma Mater, we bear 
with us that same ineffaceable 
bond of unity which we have 
shared in our four years together. 



N 



O 



R 



S 





To each of us Boston College has 
presented a different character. 
Her influences, her ideals and 
her disciplines become part of us 
as our scholastic careers draw 
to a close. We are now her 
sons and daughters enriched with 
all her natural beauty, her 
spirit and truth. We have attained 
an end unto an end, and as we 
leave Alma Mater, we bear 
with us that same ineffaceable 
bond of unity which we have 
shared in our four years together. 




COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 




Senior Class Officers — Joseph Sullivan, Secretary; John Joyce, President; J. Roddy Cannon, Treasurer; AntJiony- 
O'Malley, Vice President. 



250 




ROBERT B. ADAMS 

31, Annette Avenue, Merrick, New York 

A.B. Sociology— New York Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Heights 3, 
3, 2; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 



Sodality 



JOHN J. AHEARN 

33 Rock Street, Norwood, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Sub Turri 4 (Faculty Editor); Economics Acad- 
emy 4, 3, 2 (Treasurer 4); Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3, 2; Gold Key Society 
4, 3, 2; Aquinas Circle 3; Jr. Week Pops (Co-Chairman); Section 
Rep. 2; Orientation 4, 3; Prom Committee 2; Intramurals 2, 1. 



MICHAEL F. AHEARN 

24 Liberty Street, East Braintree, Massachusetts 

B.S. Physics — Physics Club 4, 3, 2; Sigma Pi Sigma 4, 3; Ricci Math 
Academy 4, 2; Heights 4; Order of the Cross and Crown 4; Intra- 
murals 4, 3; Orientation 4, 3; Commencement Committee 3; Dean's 
List. 



DONALD L. AIKEN 

87 North Union Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 

A.B. Mathematics — Ricci Math Academy 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2; 
Dean's List. 






ALEX P. ALEXOPOULOS 

158 Hillside Street, Roxbury, Massachusetts 
B.S. Chemistry 




GEORGE P. ALLENDORF, JR. 

79 Harvard Avenue, Hyde Park, Massachusetts 

B.S. Chemistry — Chem. Society 4, 3; Section Rep. 2, 1; Intramurals 
2, 1. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



ANDREW E. ALOISI 

50 Lynnway, Revere, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Dramatics Society 2; Bellarmine Law and Govt. 
Academy 4, 3; Psychology Club 3; Economics Academy 4, 3; 
W.R.L. 3; Public Speaking Club 4; Orientation 4. 



JOHN N. AMABILE 

75 Colgate Street, Jersey City, New Jersey 
A.B. Mathematics— Football 4, 3, 2, 1; R.I. Club 4; Ricci Math 



Academy 4, 3. 









251 



JOHN WARD AMIRAULT 

88 Stedman Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 

A.B. Sociology — Sub Turn' 4 (Features Editor); Jr. Show; Psy- 
chology Club 4. 





GERALD E. ANESKEWICH 

Rocktown Road, Lambertville, New Jersey 

A.B. Mathematics — Ricci Math Academy 4, 3; Psychology Club 3; 
New York Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (President 4, 3); Cadet Officers Club 4, 3 
(Secretary 4); Jr. Week Committee; R.O.T.C. Ball Committee 4; 
Dance Committee 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Football 1 ; Orientation 4. 




JiJfVfe 



ANTHONY J. BERTOLINO 

160 East Main Street, Gloucester, Massachusetts 

A.B. History and Government — Cadet Officers Club 4, 3; Historical 
Society 4; Section Rep. 1; W.R.L. 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 




ALFRED R. BERUBE 

282 Washington Street, Salem, Massachusetts 

B.S. Natural Science— Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Cadet Officers Club 
4, 3; Rifle Team 2. 



DAVID C. BILODEAU 

31 Williamson Avenue, Berlin, New Hampshire 
A.B. Economics — Sub Turri 4; Baseball 4, 3. 




ANTHONY T. BRAWLEY, JR. 

12 Beech Street, Braintree, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Economics Academy 3, 2; Section Rep. 2; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



<€:: *%»*' 




COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 





JOHN F. BREEN 

21 Garfield Avenue, Medford, Massachusetts 

B.S. Physics— Lewis Drill Team 3, 2, 1; Cadet Officers Club 4, 3; 
Physics 4, 3. 



JAMES E. BRENNAN 

45 Norfolk Road, Cohasset, Massachusetts 

A.B. Mathematics — Commencement Committee 3; Orientation 4; 
Dean's List. 




DENIS J. BRIAND 

51 Pond Lane, Arlington, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Economics Academy 3; lntramurals 3, 2, ] ; Dean's 
List. 



EDMUND G. BUCKLEY 

25 Main Street, Foxboro, Massachusetts 

B.S. Biology— Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Sailing Club 
4; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Jr. Show; Jr. Week Committee. 



EDWARD J. BURKE 

40 Eliot Street, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

A.B. English—Hockey 4, 3, 2, I; Lewis Drill Team 4, 3; Cadet 
Officers Club 4, 3; German Academy 3. 



JOHN L. BURKE, JR. 

1147 Hope Street, Bristol, Rhode Island 

A.B. Mathematics — Ricci Math Academy 4, 3; R. I. Club 4, 3, 2 
(Treasurer 4); lntramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 





JOSEPH V. BURKE 

15 Seager Court, Brighton, Massachusetts 
A.B. Sociology 



KEVIN P. BURKE 

69 Metropolitan Avenue, Roslindale, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



ROBERT W. BURNAND, JR. 

R.F.D. 380 Bellingham Road, Mendon, Massachusetts 

B.S. Physics — Physics Club 4; Italian Academy 4; German Acad- 
emy 4; Dean's List 2. 



EDWIN F. BUTTERS 

75 Landseer Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Economics Academy 3, 2, I; Finance Academy 
2, 1; Rifle Club 4. 





tcfc 



253 



KEVIN T. BYRNE 

24 Ticknor Street, South Boston, Massachusetts 

A.B. English — Dramatics Society 4, 3, 2, 1 (President 4); Marquette 
Debating Society 2, 1 (President 2); B. C. Debating Society 4, 3 
(Vice-President 3, President 4); Class Officer 2, 1 (Secretary 2, 1); 
Student Senate 2, 1; Class Council 2, 1; Public Speaking Club 1; 
Dean's List. 



FRANCIS L. CAHILL 

55 Hilma Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 
A.B. Greek — Humanities 4, 3, 2. 






PHILIP J. CALLAN, JR. 

57 Freeman Street, Auburndale, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3 (Secretary 4); Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



4 




ABEL W. CAMARA 

9 Bridge Street, North Easton, Massachusetts 

A.B. Mathematics — Ricci Math Academy 4; Young Democrats 
Club 4; Dean's List. 



STEPHEN J. CAMER 

47 Howitt Road, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

B.S. Biology— Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 4, 3; Section Rep. 
4, 3; Order of the Cross and Crown 4; English Academy 4; Mardi 
Gras Dance 3; Cosmos 4; Humanities 4; Dean's List. 




VINCENT M. CANNISTRARO 

365 River Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 

A.B. English— -Writers Workshop 1; Stylus 4, 3; English Academy 
4; Humanities 4. 





COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 





254 







J. RODDY CANNON 

32 Brae Burn Road, Milton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Physics— Heights 4, 3, 2, 1 (Feature Editor 4, Copy Editor 3) 
Sigma Pi Sigma 4, 3; Physics Club 2; Jr. Show; Orientation 4, 3 
Class Officer 4 (Treasurer); Student Senate 4; Class Council 4 
Jntramurals 2, 1. 



RICHARD P. CANTIN 

101 West High Street, Somersworth, New Hampshire 

A.B. Sociology — Mendel Club 2, 1 ; Track 4, 3; Gold Key Society 4; 
Prom Committee 3; Psychology Club 4; Section Rep. 2; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 





GEORGE H. CAREY 

15 Perkins Square, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

B.S. Chemistry — Chemical Society 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Affiliate Amer. Chem- 
ical Society 4, 3, 2, 1. 



fm^' 




1 fc 



RAYMOND D. CARIGNAN 

142 Greenwood Street, East Hartford, Connecticut 
A.B. English — Dean's List. 



ALFRED F. CAROLONZA, JR. 

256 Tremont Avenue, Orange, New Jersey 

A.B. History and Government — Football 1; Dorm Rep. 1; New 
York Club 3, 2, 1; Italian Academy 4; Spanish Academy 4; Dean's 
List. 



PHILIP M. CARUSO 

1581A Centre Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

B.S. Biology— Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Sodality 4, 2, 1; Sailing Team 
2, 1; Italian Club 2, 1; Mendel Club 4, 3, 2; Class Officer 2, 1 (Vice- 
President 2, 1); Student Senate 2, 1; Class Council 2, 1; Gold Key 
4, 2, 1; B. C. Film Society 2, 1; Jr. Week Communion Breakfast 
(Co-Chairman); Dean's List; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 







DONALD V. CELATA 

64 Gov. Winthrop Road, Somerville, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Sub Turri 4; Economics Academy 4, 3; Intra- 
murals 2, 1. 



JOHN J. CICCONI 

21 Shannon Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 
B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3; Dean's List; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



JOHN T. CINELLA, JR. 

176 Main Street, Lee, Massachusetts 
A.B. History and Government — Sub Turri 4; Western Mass. Club 
3; Bellarmine Law and Govt. Academy 4; Italian Academy 4; 
Dorm Rep. 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 1. 



ROBERT M. COAN 

47 Eliot Street, South Natick, Massachusetts 

A.B. History and Government — Band 3, 2, I; Historical Society 4; 
Dean's List. 




255 



DANIEL S. COHEN 

I Hackensack Court, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

A.B. History and Government — German Academy 2; Historical So- 
ciety 4, 3; Young Democrats Club 4; Bellarmine Law and Govt. 
Academy 4; Dean's List. 



PHILIP A. COLE 

56 Munn Avenue, Bogota, New Jersey 
A.B. English— Dorm Rep. 2; German Academy 4; Dramatic So- 
ciety 2; Junior Year Abroad. 






HAMMOND C. COLLINS 

81 Waldeck Road, Milton, Massachusetts 
B.S. Biology— Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Rifle Club 2, 1. 



BARRY J. CONNELLY 

23 Bunton Street, Milton, Massachusetts 

A.B. English — Sub Turri 4; Gold Key 1; English Academy 4, 3; 
Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



JAMES F. CONWAY, JR. 

95 South Street, Roslindale, Massachusetts 

A.B. English— B.C. Band 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Dinner Dance 
Committee 2; Jr. Show; Jr. Week Communion Breakfast Com- 
mittee; Jr. Week Jazz Show Committee; Prom Committee 4 (Co- 
Chairman); Intramurals 2, 1. 





GERALD P. CORCORAN 

34 Moulton Street, Newton, Massachusetts 



B.S. Biology— Mendel Club 4, 3. 
3, 2; Dean's List. 



2, 1; Gold Key 2; Intramurals 




COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 





256 



dtk 



HERBERT H. COUGHLAN, JR. 

75 Campbell Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Sub Turri 4 (Features Editor); Finance Academy 
3; Alumni Committee 4; Orientation 4; Economics Academy 4, 3; 
Jr. Show; Young Democrats Club 2; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



WILLIAM G. CROFWELL 

49 Fenwood Road, Boston 15, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 





WILLIAM J. CRONIN 

56 Union Street, Woburn, Massachusetts 

A.B. Mathematics— -Sub Turri 4; Gold Key 2, 1; Jr. Week Com- 
mittees; Orientation 4; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 



^Hi ^■hL 



4 




JOHN T. CUMMINGS 

56 Gladstone Street, Orient Heights, Massachusetts 

B.S. Physics — Heights 4, 3, 2 (News Editor 4, 3); Sigma Pi Sigma 
4, 3 (Vice-President 4); Physics Club 3, 2, 1; Young Democrats 
Club 4, 3; Jr. Show; W.R.L. 4; Order of the Cross and Crown 4; 
Rifle Club 2, 1; Dean's List. 



PETER A. CUNIS 

38 Fountain Street, Ashland, Massachusetts 

A.B. Philosophy— Chem. Society 3; Mendel Club 2; Baseball 4, 2; 
Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Semper Fidelis Society 4; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



PAUL J. CURTIN 

11 Raymond Avenue, Somerville, Massachusetts 

A.B. Mathematics — Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3; Ricci Math 
Club 4, 3; Jr. Week Jazz Show Committee; Intramurals. 





WALTER R. CUSKEY 

147 Milton Avenue, Hyde Park, Massachusetts 

A.B. Sociology — Track Team 4, 3, 2; Psychology Club 4; Dean's 
List; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 



ROBERT B. DAIGNEAULT 

24 Winthrop Street, Marlboro, Massachusetts 

B.S. Biology— Mendel Club 4, 3, 2; Gold Key Society 4, 3; Dean's 
List. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



FRANCIS J. DALEY 

97 Clark Street, Newton, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics — Dean's List. 



ROBERT A. DALEY 

2 Cheever Street, Chelsea, Massachusetts 
A.B. Classics— Public Speaking Club 3, 2; Kappa Pi 3; Dean's List. 






WILLIAM M. DALEY 

3 Fiske Road, Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3; Hockey 4, 3, 2, 1 ; W.V.B.C. 
4, 3; Bellarmine Law and Govt. Academy 4, 3. 




ROBERT F. DALTON 

10 Grayfield Avenue, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

A.B. English — German Academy 3, 1; English Academy 2; Intra- 
murals 4, 3; Dean's List. 




^B it , 





PHILIP M. DAVIS 

203 Main Street, Stoneham, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Orientation 4; Economics Academy 4, 3; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 




PETER R. DEE 

11 Fairmount Street, Winchester, Massachusetts 

A.B. English — Dramatic Society 4, 3, 2, 1; Heights 4, 3, 2, 1; Sec- 
tion Rep. 2; Stylus 4, 3; Jr. Show (Director and Chairman); English 
Academy 4. 



THOMAS R. DEVENEY 

38 Percival Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
A.B. Mathematics — Ricci Math Academy 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



VIRGINIO F. DeVITA 

350 Medford Street, Charlestown, Massachusetts 

A.B. History — Chem. Club 1; German Academy 2; Historical So- 
ciety 4, 3 (President 4); Bellarmine Law and Govt. Academy 3; 
Humanities 4, 3; Heights 4, 3, 2 (Associate Editor 3, 2; News 
Editor 4, 3); Phi Alpha Theta 4, 3; Commencement Committee 3; 
Young Democrats Club 4, 3; Dean's List. 




COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 





258 



*rA 4k «ft 



OWEN F. DEVLIN 

73 Compton Street, Boston 18, Massachusetts 
B.S. Natural Sciences — Lewis Drill Team 4, 3. 



ERNEST A. DiMATTIA, JR. 

719 Washington Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 

A.B. Mathematics — Italian Academy 4, 3; Ricci Math Academy 4 
3; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3; Physics Club 4; Jr. Week Barn 
Dance Committee. 




JOHN P. DOHERTY, JR. 

38 Greaton Road, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 
A.B. English — English Academy 2, 1. 



JAMES W. DOLAN 

11 Cabot Street, Milton, Massachusetts 

A.B. English — Jr. Week Committee; W.R.L. 4; Bellarmine Law and 
Govt. Academy 4; Young Democrats Club 4, 3; Intramurals 2, 1. 



KEVIN F. DONOGHUE 

230 Lake View Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Sub Turri 4; Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3, 2 (Secretary 4); 
Gold Key Society 4, 3, 2; Lewis Drill Team 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Cadet Officers 
Club 4, 3; Chess Team 2, 1; Jr. Week Committee; Prom Committee 
3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



KEITH W. DONOHOE 

146 Corlies Avenue, Pelham, New York 

Jr. Show; Intramurals 4, 



A.B. History— New York Club 4, 3, 
3, 2, 1. 





JOHN V. DONOVAN 

125 Templeton Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Gold Key Society 4, 3, 2; Economics Academy 4, 
3, 2 (President 4); Omicron Chi Epsilon 4, 3 (National Vice-Presi- 
dent 4); Public Speaking Club 4, 3, 2 (Treasurer 4); Prom Com- 
mittee 3 (Chairman); Orientation 3; Commencement Committee 3 
(Chairman); Aquinas Circle 4, 3; W.R.L. 4, 3; Bellarmine Law and 
Govt. Academy 4; Dean's List. 



THOMAS A. DORSEY 

73 Boardman Street, Rochester, New York 

B.S. Natural Science — Band 2, 1 ; Dorm Council 2; Mendel Club 
4, 3, 2, 1; Orientation 4, 3, 2; Stylus 4, 3 (Business Manager 4, 3; 
Associate Editor 4). 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



THOMAS W. DOW 

77 Linden Street, Allston, Massachusetts 

B.S. Biology— Band 4, 3; Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Stylus 3, 2, 1; 
Heights 2, 1; Humanities 1; German Club 3; Psychology Club 4, 3; 
Writer's Workshop 2; Tennis Team 4, I. 



JOSEPH S. DRAGONETTI 

27 Dudley Street, Saugus, Massachusetts 

B.S. Chemistry — Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Chemical Society 4; 
German Academy 4; Intramurals 4, 2, 1. 




259 



DAVID I. DRISCOLL, JR. 

74 Harriet Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 
A.B. History and Government 




CHARLES F. DUFFY 

35 Granite Place, Milton, Massachusetts 

A.B. English—Glee Club 3, 2; Stylus 4, 3; English Academy 4; 
Intramurals 2, 1. 







MICHAEL A. DUFFY 

Winona Road, Ashland, New Hampshire 

B.S. Natural Science — Jr. Week Barn Dance Committee (Co-Chair- 
man); Orientation 4; Dorm Rep. 4; W.V.B.C. 4, 3; Dean's List. 



DOUGLAS W. DUNN, JR. 

76 Sammet Street, Everett, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Economics Academy 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Dean's List. 



BRIAN D. EARLEY 

22 Burbank Road, Medford, Massachusetts 

A.B. Sociology — Psychology Club 4, 3; Hockey 1; Sailing Team 4, 
3, 2, 1; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Gold Key Society 2; Intra- 
murals 2, 1. 



LAWRENCE C. EISENHAUER 

30 Amherst Court, Huntington, New York 
B.S. Biology— Football 4, 3, 2, 1; Basketball 3, 1; Track 4. 






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 




260 



M'Mk 




ALDO P. ELICONE 

40 Lewis Street, Everett, Massachusetts 



A.B. Economies- 
Dean's List 3, 1. 



-Economics Academy 4, 3; Italian Academy 4; 



PHILIP S ELLERIN 

99 Shurtleff Street, Chelsea, Massachusetts 

B.S. Biology — Order of the Cross and Crown 4; Band 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Section Rep. 2, 1; Cosmos 4, 3 (Circulation Manager 4); Orienta- 
tion 4, 3; Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 





4 



te 



A 



EDWARD J. FISH 

60 Henry Street, Hartford, Connecticut 

A.B. History and Government — Connecticut Club 4, 3, 2, 1; His- 
torical Society 4, 3; Orientation 4; Intramurals4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 



JOSEPH F. FITZGERALD 

101 Pleasant Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
B.S. Physics— B\. Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 2; Dean's List. 





**v {I 







RICHARD L. FABIAN 

47 Buckingham Street, Oakville, Connecticut 

fl.S. Biology— Conn. Club 3, 2, 1 ; Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Film So- 
ciety 3,2, 1 ; Dramatic Society 2; Dean's List. 



JOHN P. FARRELL, JR. 

15 Fearless Avenue, Lynn, Massachusetts 
A.B. Physchology — Psychology Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Vice-President). 



iW 




JOHN E. FLYNN 

40 Henry Street, Framingham, Massachusetts 

B.S. Chemistry— Chemistry Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Bl. 
Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Affiliate Amer. Chem. Society 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



J. WILLIAM FLYNN 

31 Old Dock Road, Kings Park, New York 

A.B. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3, 2; Marketing Academy 
4; New York Club 4, 3, 2, 1; French Club 3; Dean's List. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



JOHN F. FOLEY 

312 Farrington Street, Wollaston, Massachusetts 
B.S. Natural Science 



VINCENT D. FOLEY 

I4A King Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics — W.R.L. 4. 





T*Nr 



~ V 



MAURICE F. FORD 

12 Moultrie Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics — Intramurals 3, 2; Dean's List. 



JOSEPH R. FORRY 

16 Vera Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 



A.B. English 






THOMAS C. GAFFNEY 

48 Warren Street, Newton Centre, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics — Semper Fidelis Club 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



EUGENE F. GALBAN 

520 E. 86th Street, New York, New York 

A.B. Sociology — Spanish Academy 4, 3, 2, 1 (President 4); Writer's 
Workshop 2; New York Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Italian Academy 4, 3, 2, 1. 



FRANCIS W. GALLISHAW 

69 Commonwealth Park West, Newton Centre, Massachusetts 

B.S. Biology— Sub Turri 4; Gold Key Society 2, 1 ; Mendel Club 4, 
3, 2, 1; Section Rep. 4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 





JOHN F. GALLIVAN 

100 Lonsdale Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
A.B. Philosophy — The Heights 4, 3 (Editor-in-Chief 4, News Co- 
Editor 3); The Humanities 4, 3 (Associate Editor 4, 3); Alpha Sigma 
Nu 4; Dean's List. 








COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 




262 



*\M 




ROBERT W. GARNER 

149 Summer Street, Weymouth, Massachusetts 
A.B. English — Historical Society 4. 



DAVID J. GARVIN 

45 Whitin Avenue, Revere, Massachusetts 

B.S. Biology— Gold Key Society 3, 2; Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Class 
Officer 3 (Treasurer); Student Senate 3; Class Council 3; Orienta- 
tion 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 




•*S3** 




iitf 



THEODORE C. GEIS 

25 Wigglesworth Street, Roxbury, Massachusetts 
B.S. Physics—Band 4, 3, 2, 1. 



4 



WILLIAM J. GENOVA 

129 Grasmere Street, Newton, Massachusetts 
B.S. Biology— Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Psychology Club 4, 2, 1. 






ixM 



JOHN V. GAVIN 

2 Pinedale Road, Roslindale, Massachusetts 

B.S. Physics— Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3, 1; Physics Club 4, 3; 
Ricci Math Academy 4, 3; Chess Club 2; Italian Academy 4. 



THOMAS V. GEAGAN, JR. 

66 Poplar Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 

B.S. Biology— Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Secretary 3); Honors Pro- 
gram 1; Dean's List. 






MARIO GIANGRANDE 

44 Ramsdell Avenue, Roslindale, Massachusetts 

A.B. Modern Languages — Le Cercle Francais 4, 3, 2; Italian Acad- 
emy 4, 3, 2; Rod and Gun Club 4, 3; Dean's List. 



CHARLES M. GLASHAUSSER 

50 Midland Avenue, Glen Ridge, New Jersey 

B.S. Physics— Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1 (Prefect 4, 3); Sigma Pi Sigma 4, 3, 
2, 1 (President 4); Dean's List. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



STANLEY T. GRABOWSKI 

2 Fairfax Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 



B.S. Physics 



ROBERT P. GRAHAM 

52 Thurston Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 

A.B. Mathematics — Ricci Math Academy 4; Baseball 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Section Rep. 3; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



>*** 




JTik 



263 




DANTE R. GRECO 

32 Beacon Street, Natick, Massachusetts 
B.S. Biology— Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Dean's List. 



TIMOTHY E. GUINEY 

48 Oakdale Road, Canton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Biology— Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (President 4); Order of the 
Cross and Crown 4; Honors Program 4, 3, 2, 1; Orientation 3; 
Commencement Committee 3; Heights 4, 3, 2, 1; Humanities 4, 3, 
2, 1; Cosmos 4, 3, 2; Scope 4, 3, 2; Dean's List. 







RICHARD P. HAGGERTY 

59 Bonwood Road, Needham, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics — Basketball 1. 



HAROLD J. HALL 

814 W. Pearl Street, Jackson, Mississippi 
A.B. Economics — Track 4, 3, 2, 1; Section Rep. 3, 2, 1. 



JAMES J. HARRINGTON 

48 S. Munroe Terrace, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
A.B. English — English Academy 4, 3; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4. 




THOMAS E. HART 

1 8 Hemlock Road, Newton, Massachusetts 

A.B. German — Writer's Workshop 1 ; Public Speaking 2; Ricci Math 
Academy 1; Heights 4, 3, 2; Section Rep. 2; Junior Year Abroad; 
Dean's List. 




II 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 





264 





P.- 




RICHARD D. HAYES 

16 Colonial Drive, Arlington, Massachusetts 

A.B. English — Toastmasters' Club 4; Lewis Drill Team 4, 3, 2, 
Cadet Officers Club 4; Dean's List. 



ROBERT L. HAZARD, JR. 

10 Craft Road, East Natick, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Economics Academy 3; Cadet Officers Club 4, 3; 
W.R.L. 4; Jr. Week Committees; Intramurals 2, 1. 




MAHMOUD I. HAZINEH 

P.O. Box 19, Jericho, Jordan 



A.B. Economics 



JOHN E. HEALEY, JR. 

20 Judson Street, Boston, Massachusetts 
B.S. Chemistry — Chemical Society 4, 3, 2, 1. 



WILLIAM R. HEALY 

30 Franklin Avenue, Swampscott, Massachusetts 

B.S. Biology— Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1 (Vice-President 4); Mendel Club 
4, 3, 2, 1 ; Dean's List. 



THOMAS C. HEFFERNAN, JR. 

39 Range Road, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

A.B. English — Stylus 4, 2 (Associate Editor 4); Humanities 4, 3, '< 
(Associate Editor 4, 3); Heights 4, 3, 2; Library Committee 4, 3 
Dramatics Society 4, 2, 1; Debating Society 4; Public Speaking 1 
English Academy 4, 3 (Treasurer 4); Class Officer 2 (Treasurer) 
Student Senate 2; Class Council 2. 





GEORGE V. HIGGINS 

457 Union Street, Rockland, Massachusetts 

A.B. English— Mendel Club 2, 1; Band 2, 1; Heights 3, 2; English 
Academy 4, 3 (Vice-President 4); Stylus 4, 3, 2, 1 (Editor 4, Senior 
Editor 3, Associate Editor 2); Humanities 4; Dean's List. 



GERARD A. HIGGINS 

7 Holiday Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
B.S. Sociology 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



JOHN E. HIGGINS, JR. 

33 Holland Road, Melrose, Massachusetts 

A.B. English — Bellarmine Law and Govt. Academy 4, 3 (President 
4); W.R.L. 4, 3 (Treasurer 3); Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 3, 2, 1; 
Section Rep. 2; Public Affairs Committee 4; Debating Society 4; 
English Academy 4; Prom Committee 4; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 



CORNELIUS J. HOLLAND 

18 Morey Road, Roslindale, Massachusetts 

A.B. History and Government — Bellarmine Law and Govt. Acad- 
emy 3, 2, 1; Historical Society 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 




265 



KENNETH J. HOLLAND 

1650 Commonwealth Avenue, Brighton, Massachusetts 

A. B. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3, 2; Cadet Officers Club 
4, 3; Intramurals 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 



EDWARD D. HURLEY, JR. 

984 Canton Avenue, Milton, Massachusetts 

A.B. English— Ski Team 4, 3, 2, 1 (Captain 4, 3); Heights 4, 3, 2, 1 
(Managing Editor 4, News Editor 3). 







TIMOTHY F. HURLEY 

56 Green Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

A.B. History and Government — Historical Society 4, 3, 2; Bellar- 
mine Law and Govt. Academy 4, 3; W.R.L. 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 
2, 1; Dean's List. 



GERALD P. HYNES 

60 Barber Road, Framingham, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics— Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 3; Ski Club 3; Jr. 
Show; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



ALBERT G. JACOBBE 

1 1 S. Monroe Terrace, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

A.B. Philosophy — Aquinas Circle 4; Section Rep. 2; Orientation 4; 
Honors Program 4; Dean's List. 



JOHN R. JOHNSON 

38 Mansur Street, Roslindale, Massachusetts 
B.S. Biology— Mendel Club 4, 3, 2. 






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 




-1 >^ **** 



266 




4£Ml4, 



> 

><■■'■■ ml 



PAUL M. JOHNSON 

14 Lewiston Street, Hyde Park, Massachusetts 
A.B. History and Government 



RICHARD F. JOHNSON 

107 Hillsdale Road, Somerville, Massachusetts 

A.B. Classics— Band 4, 2, 1; Glee Club 4; Bl. Oliver Plunkett So- 
ciety 4. 





THOMAS C. JONES 

61 Page Road, Newtonville, Massachusetts 

A.B. Sociology — Rifle Team 3, 2, 1; Lewis Drill Team 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Dean's List. 






JOSEPH V. JUDICINI 

88 Haverhill Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

A.B. Modern Languages — Writers Workshop 1 ; Spanish Academy 
2, 1; Italian Academy 4; Heights 4; Mass Servers Club 1; Order of 
the Cross and Crown 4 (Marshall); Dean's List. 



JOHN E. JOYCE 

27 Thelma Road, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Class Officer 4 (President); Student Senate 4 (Pres- 
ident); Class Council 4 (Chairman); Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3, 2 (Presi- 
dent 4, Vice-President 3); Economics Academy 4, 3; Public Speak- 
ing 4, 3, 2; Section Rep. 3, 1; Sub Turri 3; Dean's List. 



EDWARD R. KARAZIN, JR. 

1 Forest Drive, Westport, Connecticut 

A.B. Economics — Camera Club 3, 2; Gold Key Society 4, 3; Eco- 
nomics Academy 4, 3; Heights 3; Cadet Officers Club 4; Intramurals 
4, 3, 2, 1. 







ANDREW J. KAS 

54 Rosewood Street, Mattapan, Massachusetts 
B.S. Biology— Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



£ A 




JOHN P. KEANE 

137 Ashcroft Road, Medford, Massachusetts 

B.S. Biology — Campus Council 4, 3 (President 4, Treasurer 3); Class 
Officer 3 (Secretary); Student Senate 3; Class Council 3; Orienta- 
tion 4, 3; Freshman Track 1; Public Affairs Forum 4; Heights 2; 
Mendel Club 4, 2, 1; Gold Key Society 4, 3, 2; Intramurals 4, 3, 
2, 1: Dean's List. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



JOHN P. KEANEY 

58 Hobart Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 
A.B. History and Government 



FRANCIS A. KEENAN, JR. 

1 1 Willard Street, Melrose, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Sub Turri 4; Glee Club 4, 3; Economics Academy 
4, 3; Public Speaking Club 2; Historical Society 2; Young Demo- 
crats Club 2; Dean's List. 





\MM 



267 



FRANCIS X. KELLY 

99 Loring Road, Winthrop, Massachusetts 
A.B. English — Glee Club 4, 3, 2; Dean's List. 



MARTIN J. KELLY 

35 Lindall Street, Roslindale, Massachusetts 

B.S. Biology — Class Officer 3 (President); Student Senate 3 (Vice- 
President); Class Council 3 (Chairman); Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Psychology Club 3, 2, 1; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Section Rep. 2; Order of the Cross and Crown 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 
2, 1; Dean's List. 








HARRY S. KEMP 

199 Upland Road, Quincy, Massachusetts 

B.S. Biology— Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Sailing Team 2, 1; Psy- 
chology Club 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, I; Dean's List. 




ROBERT C. KERANS 

23 Beechwood Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Jr. Show; Intramurals 4, 
3, 2, 1. 



JOHN J. KENNEDY 

26 Lenox Circle, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

A.B. History and Government — Young Democrats Club 4; Bellar- 
mine Law and Govt. Academy 4; Intramurals 4, 2. 







PETER P. KERR 

23 Hartwell Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Vice-President 4); Economics 
Academy 4, 3; Orientation 4. 





COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 





268 



«Jl 



ROBERT H. KILBANE 

111 Speen Street, Natick, Massachusetts 
A.B. English— W.R.L. 4, 3. 



THOMAS H. KILCOYNE, JR. 

25 Longfellow Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Cadet Officers Club 4; Economics Academy 4, 3; 
W.I.P.R. 4, 3. 






JOHN C. KILEY 

233 Middlesex Road, Brookline, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics 



DONALD J. KING 

131 Pulaski Boulevard, Kings Park, New York 

A.B. Economics — Economics Academy 3, 2, 1; New York Club 4, 
3, 2, 1; Rod and Gun Club 3; Camera Club 3. 



JOSEPH H. KING 

1 1 Brackenbury Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

B.S. Physics — Physics Club 4, 3, 2; Sigma Pi Sigma 4, 3; Orienta- 
tion 3; Commencement Committee 3; Public Speaking Club 1; 
Order of the Cross and Crown 4; Honors Program 4, 3,2, 1 ; 
Dean's List. 



DAVID F. KIRBY 

324 Auburndale Avenue, Auburndale, Massachusetts 
A.B. English 






ROY D. LAMB 

33 Milton Avenue, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

A.B. Psychology— Psychology Club 4, 3, 2; W.R.L. 4; Jr. Week 
Prom Committee; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 2. 



A. HENRY LATORELLA 

105 Waldemar Avenue, Winthrop, Massachusetts 
B.S. Biology— Gold Key Society 4, 3, 2, 1; Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



ROBERT P. LEVESQUE 

14 Chester Street, Nashua, New Hampshire 
B.S. Biology— Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Film Society 3. 



JAMES J. LIND 

111 Willow Street, Wollaston, Massachusetts 
A.B. History and Government — Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 





•f- 



MiW 



GUY LOCHIATTO 

31 Princeton Street, East Boston, Massachusetts 

A.B. Psychology — Psychology Club 4, 3, 2; Italian Club 3, 2; 
manities. 




^9tm -itir 



RICHARD W. LUCEY 

126 Auburndale Avenue, West Newton, Massachusetts 
B.S. Biology— Gold Key 3; Mendel Club 3, 2; Dean's List. 







JOHN D. LYNCH 

151 Tollgate Road, Warwick, Rhode Island 

A.B. History and Government — Bellarmine Law and Govt. Acad- 
emy 4, 3, 2; Gold Key 4, 3; Rhode Island Club 4, 3, 2 (Vice-Presi- 
dent 3); Dorm Council 4; Football 4; Spanish Academy 4, 3, 2. 



THOMAS N. LYNCH 

222 Pleasant Street, Newton, Massachusetts 

A.B. Government — Cadet Officers Club 4, 3; Historical Society 4; 
Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



HUGH A. MacDONALD, JR. 

38 Edgeworth Street, East Weymouth, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3; Dance Committee 4. 




JAMES J. MacKENZIE, JR. 

20 Ellsworth Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

B.S. Physics — Sigma Pi Sigma 4 (Secretary 4); Order of the Cross 
and Crown 4; Physics Club 3, 2; Dean's List 3, 2, 1. 



II 




COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 




JOHN M. MACKEY 

3 Clinton Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Historical Society 4; W.L.R. 3; In- 



A.B. History and Government 
tramurals 3, 2, 1. 



270 





JOHN J. MAGUIRE 

51 Edmund Road, Arlington, Massachusetts 

B.S. Physics — Section Rep. 1 ; Sigma Pi Sigma 4; Order of the Cross 
and Crown 4; Physics Club 4, 3, 2; Intramurals 3, 2, 1 ; Dean's List. 




RICHARD A. MAGUIRE 

40 Whitman Street, East Weymouth, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3, 2; Intramurals 2, 1. 



FREDERICK J. MAHADY, JR. 

29 Evergreen Street, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Semper Fidelis Society 2 (Treasurer); Intramurals 
3; Dean's List. 



WILLIAM P. MANNING 

157 Lafayette Street, Salem, Massachusetts 

B.S. Chemistry — B.C. Chemical Society 4, 3; American Chemical 
Society 4; Young Democrats Club 4; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4; 
Jr. Show 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



ROBERT E. MASOTTA 

809 South Street, Roslindale, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics — Intramurals 4, 3, 2. 





I 



wk m 




JOHN P. McCAIN 

24 Murdock Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, I. 



THOMAS F. McCARRON 

15 Madison Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

A.B. History and Government — Track 4, 2; Bellarmine Law and 
Govt. Academy 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



Robert J. McCarthy 

24 Kilgore Avenue, Medford, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics — Italian Academy 4; Economics Academy. 



JOHN C. McCORMACK 

124 Church Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

A.B. History and Government — Alpha Sigma Nu 4 (Treasurer); Bos- 
ton College Band 4, 3, 2, 1; Lewis Drill Team 1; Jr. Week Jazz 
Show Committee 3 (Chairman); W.R.L. 2; Dean's List. 







271 



PETER J. McDERMOTT 

102 Westside Avenue, Haverstraw, New York 
A.B. Pre- Medical 



Robert m. Mcdonough 

64 Elton Road, Milton, Massachusetts 

A.B. Mathematics — Ricci Math Club 4; Young Democrats Club 4; 
Commencement Committee 3; Dean's List. 





JOHN P. McGONAGLE 

13 Thornley Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

B.S. Physics— Go\d Key Society 4, 3; Physics Club 4, 3; Ricci Math 
Academy 4; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4. 




GEORGE K. McHUGH 

3 Endicott Street, Peabody, Massachusetts 

A.B. History and Government — Bellarmine Law and Govt. Acad- 
emy 4, 3; W.R.L. 4; Historical Society 4; Football 4, 3, 2, 1. 



james l. Mclaughlin 

61 Salisbury Road, Delmar, New York 

A.B. History— W.R.L. 4, 3 (President 4); Historical Society 4, 3, 2 
(Treasurer 4); Phi Alpha Theta 4, 3; Dorm Council 4; Cadet Offi- 
cers Club 3; Jr. Week Prom Committee. 





john m. Mclaughlin 

20 Everett Avenue, Dorchester 25, Massachusetts 
A.B. Mathematics 




COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 






Joseph m. Mclaughlin 

65 Ashworth Road, Squantum, Massachusetts 

A.B. History and Government — Bellarmine Law and Govt. Acad- 
emy 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 



JOHN J. McNAMARA 

433 Adams Street, Milton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Biology— Track 4, 3, 2, 1; Cosmos 4, 3 (Editor); Stylus 4, 3 
(Associate Editor); Humanities 4, 3, 2, 1 (Associate Editor); Mendel 
Club 4, 3, 2, 1. 





ROBERT E. McNAMARA 

109 Seneca Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 



B.S. Biology 



4 1 




JAMES J. McNIFF 

25 School Street, Danvers, Massachusetts 

A.B. English — Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3; Toastmasters' Circle 
4; Mendel Club 4; Intramurals 4, 1: Dean's List. 



EDWARD P. McPARTLIN 

126 Church Street, Winchester, Massachusetts 
A.B. English — Height's 2; Dean's List. 





JOHN D. MEADE 

134 Sutherland Road, Brighton, Massachusetts 
A.B. Psychology — Psychology Club 4; Dean's List. 



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J*SS» fWXKfc 




FRANK D. MICCIANTUONO 

10 Mallet Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics — Dean's List. 




NICHOLAS L. MICELOTTE, JR. 

120 Congress Street, Milford, Massachusetts 
B.S. Biology 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



ARTHUR H. MILANO 

10 California Park, Watertown, Massachusetts 

A.B. French — Sub Turri 4; Track Team 2; Marquette Debating 2; 
French Club 3, 2; Film Society 3; Heights 4, 3; Journal of Business 
3, 4; Cosmos 4, 3; Rod and Gun Club 4. 



PETER N. MILLER 

8 Cotter Street, Canton, Massachusetts 



A.B. English 





FRANCIS J. MONTILLO 

19 Westwood Street, West Newton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Chemistry — Section Rep. 4, 3, 2; Italian Club 1; German Club 
3; Chemistry Society 4, 3; Intramurals 1. 



RICHARD E. MOORE 

142 Nonantum Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 

A.B. English— Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Band 4, 3, 2; English Academy 
4, 3; Alpha Sigma Nu 4, 3; Jr. Show 3; Rifle Club 3; Section Rep. 1; 
Heights 2, 1; Dramatic Society 2, 1; Gold Key I; Intramurals 2, 1; 
Dean's List. 







DONALD C. MORENCY 

343 Lafayette Street, Salem, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3; Dean's List. 





JOHN S. MORLEY 

272 Dana Avenue, Milton, Massachusetts 
A.B. English — Dean's List. 



EDWARD P. MORRISSEY 

25 Patterson Way, South Boston, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Mendel Club 4, 3; Psychology Club 1; Dean's 
List. 




ALOYSIUS A. MUCINSKAS 

155 North Street, South Boston, Massachusetts 
A.B. Sociology — Historical Society 4; Psychology Club 4. 





COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 




274 



4 M ifk 




EUGENE F. MLILCAHY 

42 Avalon Road, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

A.B. English — Dramatics Society 4, 3, 2, I (Secretary 4); Public 
Speaking Club 4, 2, 1 (Treasurer 1); Debating Society 4, 1; Jr. 
Show; Heights 4, 2, 1; Humanities 4, 3, 2, 1. 



BRENDAN F. MULKERN 

65 Grayfield Avenue, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

A.B. English— -Jr. Week Jazz Committee 3; W.V.B.C. 1; English 
Academy 1. 






i dk 



PETER H. MULLEN 

22 Howe Road, Needham, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Lewis Drill Team 4, 3, 2, 1; Cadet Officers Club 
4, 3; Economics Academy 4, 3; Public Speaking Club 3, 2; Jr. Week 
Pops Committee 3; Intramurals 2, I. 



JOSEPH E. MULLIN 

48 W. Highland Avenue, Melrose, Massachusetts 

A.B. English — Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Order of the Cross and 
Crown 4 (Knight Commander); Alpha Sigma Nu 4; Heights 3, 2; 
Humanities 4, 3; Public Speaking Club 3, 2, 1 (Vice-President 3); 
Marquette Debating Society 1 ; Dean's List. 



THOMAS J. MUNDY, JR. 

J762 Commonwealth Avenue, Brighton, Massachusetts 

A.B. History and Government — Football 1; Hockey 1; Bellarmine 
Law and Govt. Academy 4. 



WILLIAM F. MURPHY 

40 Ellis Avenue, Reading, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics — Economics Academy 4; Italian Academy 4. 







R. MICHAEL MURRAY, JR. 

22 Woodchester Drive, Milton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Physics — Heights 4, 3, 2, l(Business Manager 4, Copy Edi- 
tor 3); Jr. Show 3; Young Democrats Club 4, 3, 2; Physics Club 
4, 3, 2; Sigma Pi Sigma Society 4, 3; W.R.L. 4; Order of the Cross 
and Crown 4; Intramurals 2, 1; Dean's List. 



MARTIN F. NOLAN 

65 Ashland Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

A.B. History — Humanities 4, 3, 2, 1 (Editor 4, 3; Associate Edi- 
tor 2); Heights 4, 3, 2, 1 (Associate Editor 4, 3); Stylus 4; Journal 
of Business 2, 1; Cosmos 4; Young Democrats Club 4, 3, 2, I 
(President 3, 2); Public Affairs Forum Committee 4, 3, 2. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



DAVID F. OBERHAUSER 

95 Thurston Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 
B.S. Chemistry — Chemical Society 4, 3, 2, 1; Sailing Team 4; Bl. 
Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Rifle Club ] ; Section Rep. 4; Heights 4; 
Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 



JAMES J. O'BRIEN 

395 School Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 
A.B. Government — Sodality 2, 1. 








275 



JAMES M. O'BRIEN 

9 Mountain Avenue, Somerville, Massachusetts 

A.B. English and Philosophy— Public Speaking Club 2, 1; Cadet 
Officers Club 4, 3 ; Debating Society 4; W.R.L. 2, 1 ; Intramurals 2, 1 . 



FINBARR M. O'CONNELL 

112 School Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 
A.B. Psychology — Psychology Club. 







EDWARD F. O'CONNOR 

20 Hollis Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

A.B. History and Government — Sub Turri 4; Bellarmine Law and 
Govt. Academy 4, 3, 2; Historical Society 4, 3; W.R.L. 4, 3, 2; 
Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Section Rep. 4; Orientation Com- 
mittee 4. 



ROBERT F. O'CONNOR 

25 Alaric Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 
A.B. English — Dean's List. 



JOHN B. O'DONNELL 

397 Hampshire Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

A.B. Sociology — Dorm Council 4, 3 (President 4); Jr. Show; Dorm 
Orientation 4, 3, 2; Prom Committee 3; Psychology Club 3, 2; 
Dean's List. 



PAUL F. O'DONNELL 

34 Snow Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 
A.B. English — English Academy 4. 






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 





J. PAUL O'KEEFE 

1466 Broadway Street, Hanover, Massachusetts 

A.B. History and Government — Public Speaking Club 3, 2; W.R.L. 
4, 3; Historical Academy 4; Bellarmine Law and Govt. Academy 4; 
Americans for Democratic Action 4; Boston College Film Society 4; 
Dean's List. 

PAUL F. O'LEARY 

26 Agawam Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

A.B. Philosophy — Aquinas Circle 4; Humanities 4; German Club 
4, 3; Sodality 4, 3, 2; Writers Club 1; Orientation Week 4; Dean's 
List. 





A 1 m 



JAMES F. O'REILLY 

79 Gore Street, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 
A.B.Latin — Ricci Math Academy 2, 1; Section Rep. 1; Intramurals 
4, 3. 



JAMES A. PARDY 

27 Quarry Lane, Milton, Massachusetts 

A.B. Government — Heights 3, 2, 1 (Assistant Business Manager 1, 
Circulation Manager 3, 2); Young Republicans Club 4, 2; W.R.L. 4. 




ANTHONY V. O'MALLEY, JR. 

1047 Walnut Street, Newton, Massachusetts 

A.B. Mathematics— Track 2, 1 ; Sodality 2, I ; Ricci Math Club 4, 3, 
2, I ; Dinner Dance 2; Jr. Week Communion Breakfast Committee 3; 
Jr. Show 3; Section Rep. 3, 2; Class Officer 4 (Vice-President); Class 
Council 4; Student Senate 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



RICHARD W. O'NEIL 

]21 Claflin Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 
B.S. Physics— Physics Club 4, 2, 1; Jr. Show 3; Dean's List. 




EDWARD C. PARKER 

90 Alexander McGregor Road, Pawtucket, Rhode Island 

A.B. History and Government — Rod and Gun Club 3, 2; W.R.L. 
4, 3; Bellarmine Law and Govt. 4, 3; Rhode Island Club 3, 2, 1 
(Secretary 3); Dorm Rep. 3; Section Rep. 3, 2, 1; Intramurals. 



ALLAN N. PEARSON 

57 Fairmount Avenue, Saugus, Massachusetts 

A.B. German — German Academy 4, 2; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 
3; Dean's List. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



PAUL A. PELLETIER 

40 East Street, Dedham, Massachusetts 
A.B. Mathematics 



ERNEST J. PETRUCCELLI 

156 Main Street, Melrose, Massachusetts 
B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 2, 1 ; Intramurals 4, 3, 2. 




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FRANCIS P. PISCAL 

306 New Jersey Avenue, Point Pleasant Beach, New Jersey 
A.B. History and Government— W.R.L. 3; Class Rep. 3; Football 
4, 3, 2, 1 (Manager 4, 3, 2); Dean's List. 




■«%Ss*, 



DAVID R. PLANTE 

128 Lynch Street, Providence, Rhode Island 
A.B. French — Cercle Francais 4 (President); Writer's Workshop 1 ; 
Dean's List. 



ik 






JAMES W. PRENDERGAST 

265 Crescent Avenue, Revere, Massachusetts 

A.B. History and Government — Historical Society 4, 3, 2; W.R.L. 
4, 3, 2 (Treasurer 3); Public Speaking Club 4, 3; Bellarmine Law 
and Govt. 4. 



KENNETH J. PRESKENIS 

528 East 6th Street, South Boston, Massachusetts 
A.B. Mathematics — Ricci Math Club 4, 3; Dean's List. 



HENRY M. QUINLAN 

40 Cummings Road, Brighton, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3, 2; Cadet Officers Club 
4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



PIERCE A. QUINLAN 

247 Blue Hills Parkway, Milton, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3; Orientation 4, Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2. 





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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



278 





JOSEPH T. QUIRK 

15 Atlantic Street, South Boston, Massachusetts 

A.B. English — Young Democrats 4; German Academy 4, 3; Writer's 
Workshop 1 ; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Dean's List. 



ULTAN M. RICE 

1185 Brook Road, Milton, Massachusetts 

A.B. Psychology— Stylus 4, 3, 2 (Associate Editor 4); Writer's Work- 
shop 2; Psychology Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Secretary 4); Commencement 
Committee 3; Dean's List. 




EDWARD P. RICUPERO 

63 Home Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

A.B. History and Government — Football 1; Historical Academy 4, 
3, 2; W.R.L. 4, 3; Bellarmine Law and Govt. Academy 4, 3; Dean's 
List. 



ROBERT G. ROONEY 

301 Nahant Road, Nahant, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics — Band 1 ; Dean's List. 



JOHN H. ROSETTI 

9 Maple Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

B.S. history — Italian Academy 2, 1; Sodality 2, 1; Heights 3; 
English Academy 3; Historical Society 4; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 
4; B.C. Rifle Team I; Film Society 4. 



ALBERT J. ROSSI 

32 Burgess Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
B.S. English — Intramurals 1 ; Writers Workshop 1 ; Dean's List. 





FRANCIS S. RUSSELL 

19 Wellsmere Road, Roslindale, Massachusetts 
A.B. Psychology — Psychology Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Treasurer 4); Ger- 
man Club 1. 



STEPHEN C. RUSSO 

18 Moulton Road, Arlington, Massachusetts 

B.S. History and Government — Bellarmine Law and Govt. Academy 
4, 3 (Secretary 4); Italian Academy 4, 3; Historical Society 4, 3; 
W.R.L. 4. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



FREDERICK J. RYAN 

92 Pacific Street, Rockland, Massachusetts 

A.B. Sociology — Psychology Club 4, 3; Italian Club 4; Sociology 
Club 4, 3. 



WILLIAM J. RYAN, JR. 

34 Elmwood Avenue, South Braintree, Massachusetts 

A.B. English — B.C. Dramatic Society 4, 3, 2 (Vice-President 4); 
B.C. Debating Society 1 ; Bellarmine Law and Govt. Academy 4; 
Intramurals 2, 1. 





*8V 



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279 



PATRICK A. SABATINO 

298 Washington Avenue, New Rochelle, New York 

A.B. Economics — New York Club 2, 1; Spanish Academy 4, 3, 2, 1 
(Treasurer 4; Vice-President 3); Italian Academy 4, 3, 2, 1. 



ROBERT P. SALVATORE 

53 Vinal Street, Revere, Massachusetts 

A.B. Psychology — Historical Society 4, 3; Psychology Club 4, 3, 2; 
Intramurals 4, 3. 






JOHN A. SCALES 

191 "L" Street, South Boston, Massachusetts 
A.B. Mathematics 




JOSEPH R. SCALLEY 

55 Parkton Road, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

B.S. Biology— Heights 4, 3, 2, 1 (Copy Editor 3, Sports Editor 4); 
Orientation 3; Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Humanities 2; Stylus 3, 2; 
Class Officer 3 (Vice-President); Student Senate 3; Class Council 3; 
Dean's List. 



PAUL M. SCANNELL 

43 Iroquois Street, Roxbury, Massachusetts 

A.B. Sociology— Psychology Club 4, 3, 2, 1; W.R.L. 4, 3; Bellar- 
mine Law and Govt. Academy 3; Historical Academy 4; Dean's 
List. 





EDWARD S. SCULLANE 

18 Park Avenue, Wellesley Hill, Massachusetts 
A.B. English 




COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



280 







BERNARD J. SHEA 

27 Champney Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 

A.B. History— Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3, 2, 1 (President 4); 
Historical Society 4, 3 (Secretary 4); Rifle Club 1 ; German Academy 
1; Public Speaking Forum 2; Intramurals 1. 



DANIEL R. SHEA 

6 Mystic Street, Charlestown, Massachusetts 
A.B. English — English Academy 4, 3 (Treasurer); Dean's List 3. 




THOMAS F. SHEEHAN 

Walnut Street, Natick, Massachusetts 



B.S. Biology 



JOSEPH M. SHIELDS 

19 Parkman Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics — Intramurals 2, 1. 



ROBERT K. SIMON 

North Road, Peconic, New York 

B.S. Chemistry— Glee Club 2, 1; Chemistry Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Presi- 
dent 4); Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4; German Academy 3; Young 
Democratic Club 4; New York Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



JAMES F. SMITH 

179 Huron Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 
A.B. Sociology — Psychology Club 4, 3; Dean's List. 




4m t 






WILLIAM J SNOW 

Pine Point Road, West Scarborough, Maine 
B.S. Physics — Dean's List. 



RICHARD A. SPRIANO 

111 Kittredge Street, Roslindale, Massachusetts 
B.S. Biology— Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Rod and Gun Club 4, 2, 1. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



JOHN S. STASIOWSKI 

11 Smith Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

A.B. Psychology — Sodality 1; Psychology Club 4, 3, 2; Honors 
Program 2. 



ALBERT J. STEN 

837 Hancock Street, Wollaston, Massachusetts 
B.S. Biology— Mendel Club 4, 2, 1 ; Jr. Show; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 




281 



WILLIAM STEWART, III 

23 Southwick Street, Salem, Massachusetts 
B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 



RICHARD F. STRAUB 

132 Woodhouse Avenue, Wallingford, Connecticut 

A.B. — Sociology — Spanish Academy 2; Psychology Club 3, 2; Co- 
necticut Club 3, 2; Prom Committee 3; Jr. Show. 






ALBERT W. SULLIVAN 

323 Lincoln Street, Lexington, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics— Sub Turri 4 (Editor-in-Chief); Economics Acad- 
emy 3; Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; Omicron Chi Epsilon 4; Order of the 
Cross and Crown 4; Orientation 4; Toastmasters' Circle 3: Dean's 
List. 



ARTHUR H. SULLIVAN 

35 Newell Road, Auburndale, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics— Glee Club 4, 3, 2; Economics Academy 3; Dean's 
List. 



CHESTER SUCHECKI 

35 Jacobs Street, Peabody, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Economics Academy 4; German Academy 1, 2; 
Section Rep. 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



di k 



PATRICK S. SUDBAY 

86 Western Avenue, Gloucester, Massachusetts 
B.S. Physics 




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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



282 









DANIEL F. SULLIVAN 

25 Dustin Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 
A.B. Sociology — Gold Key Society 4, 3, 2, 1 (Secretary 4); Psy- 
chology Club 4, 3 ; Section Rep. 2; Dean's List; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1 . 



DANIEL J. SULLIVAN, JR. 

52 Hollywood Road, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

A.B. English— W.B.C.B. 3; Rod and Gun Club 4; Ski Team 4, 3; 
English Academy 4. 




life 




DAVID T. SULLIVAN 

20 Sunset Road, Salem, Massachusetts 

B.S. Biology— Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Gold Key Society 4, 3; In- 
tramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



JOSEPH W. SULLIVAN 

10 Pierce Avenue, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3; Bl. Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4; Sub Turri 4; Class Officer 4 (Secretary); Student Senate 4; 
Class Council 4; Dean's List. 



RICHARD T. SULLIVAN 

553 LaGrange Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

A.B. History and Government — Bellarmine Law and Govt. Academy 
2, 1; Historical Society 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 




JOHN M. SUTTON, JR. 

15 Pleasant View Road, Arlington, Massachusetts 

A.B. Mathematics — Lewis Drill Team 4, 3, 2, 1 (Commander 4); 
Cadet Officers Club 4, 3; Ricci Math Academy 4, 3; Gold Key 
Society 1; Hockey Manager 1. 





ELIGIJUS S. SUZIEDELIS 

68 Glendale Street, Brockton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Physics — Aquinas Circle 4; Physics Club 4, 3; Ricci Math 
Academy 4; Sodality 4. 



*44i 



PAUL J. TITTERTON 

94 Fairview Road, Farmingdale, New York 

B.S. Physics — Physics Club 2, 1; Sigma Pi Sigma 4, 3; Intramurals 
2, 1; Dean's List. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



THOMAS W. TRAYERS 

15 Hathorn Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 
B.S. Natural Science — Mendel Club 4, 2, 1. 



JOSEPH F. TULIMIERI 

145 Bourne Street, Roslindale, Massachusetts 

A.B. Sociology — Gold Key Society 4, 3, 2; Psychology Club 4, 3; 
Italian Club 4, 3, 2; Intramurals 4, 3. 





HAROLD M. TUR1ELLO, JR. 

1025 Revere Beach Parkway, Revere, Massachusetts 

Psychology Club 4, 3, 2 (President 4); Dean's 



A.B. Psychology 
List. 



THOMAS E. URBAN 

10490 Wilshire Boulevard, Beverly Hills, California 

A.B. History and Government — Rifle Team 1 ; Lewis Drill Team 4, 3, 
2, 1; Spanish Academy 2; Bellarmine Law and Govt. Academy 4. 







FRANCIS J. VACCA 

33 Alfred Street, Everett, Massachusetts 

A.B. History and Government — Public Speaking Club 4, 3, 2, 1 
(Vice-President 2, President 3); W.R.S. 4, 3, 2, 1 (President 3); 
Marquette Debating Society 1; W.V.B.C. 3. 



ROBERT J. VELAZCO 

Carrera 20 No. 53, Barquisimeto, Venezuela 

B.S. Chemistry — B.C. Chemical Society 4, 3, 2, 1; Spanish Acad- 
emy 4, 3, 2, 1 (Secretary 4, 3, 2); Bellarmine Law and Govt. Acad- 
emy 4, 1; Psychology Club 4. 



RUY S. V1LLELA 

82 Plymouth Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
A.B. History and Government — Dorm Rep. 1; Rod and Gun Club 
2; W.R.L. 4, 3; Bellarmine Law and Govt. Academy 4, 3; Rhode 
Island Club 4, 3. 





JOHN P. WALDRON 

31 Woodchester Drive, Milton, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics — Sodality 1; Football 4, 3, 2. 





COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



284 





GERALD WALSH 

19 Windsor Road, Stoneham, Massachusetts 
A.B. English — Orientation 4, 3; Intramurals 1. 



JAMES F. WALSH, JR. 

19 Danbury Road, Hyde Park, Massachusetts 

A.B. History and Government — Bellarmine Law and Govt. Acad- 
emy 2, 1; Historical Society 1; Accounting Academy 1. 




TIMOTHY A. WHALEN 

212 Norfolk Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

A.B. Modern Languages — Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1; French Academy 4, 
3, 2, 1; Bellarmine Law and Govt. Academy 4; Russian Academy 3, 



JOHN T. WHITE 

135 London Street, East Boston, Massachusetts 

A.B. Psychology — Psychology Club 4; Historical Society 1 ; W.B.C.B. 
Stylus 2; Humanities 2; Heights 1. 





m 




* 



ROBERT D. WEST 

16 Alden Road, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

A.B. History— Historical Academy 4, 3; W.R.L. 4, 3; W.V.B.C. 3; 
Commencement Committee 3 (Chairman); Phi Alpha Theta 4, 3; 
Dean's List. 



JOSEPH P. WHALEN 

34 Glenburnie Road, Roslindale, Massachusetts. 
A.B. Pre-Medical—Mende\ Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 






A^ 



BRUCE A. WITHERS 

21 Rollins Street, Boston, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics 



M 



JOHN T. WYROCK1 

40 Glendale Street, Everett, Massachusetts 
B.S. Physics— Rifle Club 1; Rod and Gun Club 1; Physics Club 4. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 




285 





SCHOOL 

OF 

EDUCATION 




Senior Class Officers — Maurice Cunningham, Vice President; 
Paul Devlin, President. 



Senior Class Officers — John Altieri, Treasurer; Nancy Bon- 
azzoli, Secretary. 



286 



V. ROBERT AGOSTINO 

42 Guild Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

B.S. History — Men's Sodality 4, 1; Chess Club 1; Orientation 3; 
Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 



JOHN A. ALTIERI 

Strawberry Hill Avenue, Norwalk, Connecticut 
B.S. History — Sub Turri 4 (Managing Editor); Class Officer 4, 1 
(Treasurer 4, 1); Student Senate 4, 1 (Treasurer 4); Class Council 
4, 1; Dorm Council 3, 2, 1 (Treasurer 3); Kappa Pi 4, 3, 2 (Secretary 
3, 2); CCS. 2, 1 (Treasurer 2); Dinner Dance 2 (Chairman); Mardi 
Gras Dance 3 (Chairman); Ed. Review 3, 2; Inter-Class Skits 4, 3, 
2, 1; Jr. Show; Orientation 4, 3, 2; Band 3, 2; Ed. Banquet 3 (Co- 
Chairman); Dean's List. 









JOAN M. ANGINO 

1 Farm Street, Canton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education— W .R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Pius XII Academy 
4, 3; Italian Academy 2, I; Section Rep. 3; Jr. Week Communion 
Breakfast Committee. 



NANCY A. BONAZZOLI 

48 Edinborough Street, Marlborough, Massachusetts 

B.S. English — Sub Turri 4 (Patrons' Manager); Class Officer 4 
(Secretary 4); Student Senate 4; Class Council 4; Women's Council 
2; Jr. Week Committees; Italian Academy 4, 3, 2, 1 (Secretary 4, 3); 
English Academy 4, 3; Orientation 4, 3, 2; Undergraduate Library 
Committee 4, 3 (Secretary 3); Commencement Committee 3; Holy 
Cross Victory Dance 4; W.R.A. 3, 2, 1; Ed. Review 3, 2 (Managing 
Editor); Inter-Class Skits 4; Alpha and Omega 4; Dean's List. 



PATRICIA K. BOOTH 

744 Rahway Avenue, Elizabeth, New Jersey 

B.S. Elementary Education — Heights 1; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Sailing 
Club 2, 1; Psychology Club 3, 2, 1; New York Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Bl. 
Oliver Plunkett Society 3, 2, 1; Rifle Club 3, 2; Glee Club 3, 2; Jr. 
Show; Orientation 3; Pius XII Academy 4, 3; Prom Committee 4. 




TIMOTHY C. BRADY 

56 Cliff Street, Plymouth, Massachusetts 

B.S. History — Class Officer 1 (Vice-President); Student Senate 1 
Class Council 1; Campus Council 4; CCS. 2, 1 (President 2) 
Kappa Pi 4, 3, 2 (President 3); Orientation 3; Alpha and Omega 4 
Honors Program 3, 2; Dean's List. 




BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 





JOAN BRESLIN 

552 Pleasant Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

B.S. English— W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Glee Club 2, 1 ; Sub Turri 2; Inter- 
Class Skits 3; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 2; Dinner Dance 2; Jr. 
Week Pops Committee (Co-Chairman); Commencement Com- 
mittee 3; Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Dean's List. 

MARY V. CASEY 

31 Woodbine Road, Medford, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education—Glee Club 1 ; French Club 2, 1 ; W.R.A. 
4, 3, 2, 1; Alpha and Omega 4; Dean's List. 



287 




JOHN C. COCHRAN 

47 Sutherland Road, Arlington, Massachusetts 
B.S. History— Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 2, 1; Basketball 3, 1. 



SUSAN M. COLE 

Crescent Road, Concord, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education— W.R. A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Inter-Class Skits 2; 
Jr. Show; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 2. 



GAIL M. COLLINS 

49 Westvale Road, Milton, Massachusetts 

B.S. French— French Club 4, 3 (Vice-President 4); W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1 ; 
Ed. Review 2; Inter-Class Skits 4, 3, 2, 1. 





STEPHEN J. CORCORAN, JR. 

16 Bowker Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 
B.S. History— Cadet Officers Club 4, 3; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 



life 




THOMAS F. CORCORAN 

16 Bowker Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 
B.S. History— Cadet Officers Club 4, 3; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 




FREDERICK M. CRONIN 

950 Boylston Street, Newton, Massachusetts 
B.S. Mathematics — Inter-Class Skits 4, 3 (Stage Manager 4). 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 




288 



i 




THOMAS J. CROWLEY 

160 Summer Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 

B.S. History — Orientation 3, 2; Election Committee 3 (Chairman); 
Inter-Class Skits 3, 2; Kappa Pi 4, 3, 2; Dean's List. 



MAURICE F. CUNNINGHAM 

23 Summer Street, Saugus, Massachusetts 

B.S. History— Inter-Class Skits 4, 3, 2; Class Officer 4 (Vice-Presi- 
dent); Student Senate 4; Class Council 4; Jr. Week Jazz Committee 
(Co-Chairman); Orientation 4, 3; Kappa Pi 4, 3, 2; Intramurals 
3, 2, 1. 



JUDITH J. CZARNECKI 

51 Davis Avenue, Rockville, Connecticut 

B.S. Elementary Education — Class Officer 3 (Secretary); Student 
Senate 3; Class Council 3 (Secretary); Inter-Class Skits 3, 2, 1; 
Connecticut Club 3, 2, 1; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Orientation 3; Sub 
Turri 3; Pius XII Academy 4, 3 (Vice-President). 



JOAN F. DALEY 

40 Madison Street, East Weymouth, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education— W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Bl. Oliver Plunkett 
Society 2; Italian Academy 3, 2. 1; Jr. Show; Inter-Class Skits 3. 





JEANNE M. DENYS 

805 South Monroe Avenue, Green Bay, Wisconsin 

B.S. Elementary Education — W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Jr. Week Com- 
munion Breakfast Committee; Jr. Show; Heights 1; Pius XII Acad- 
emy 4, 3; Inter-Class Skits 4, 3, 2. 



PAUL L. DEVLIN 

66 Margin Street, Peabody, Massachusetts 

B.S. Mathematics— Class Officer 4, 3 (President 4, 3); Student Sen- 
ate 4, 3 (Chairman 4, Vice-Chairman 3); Class Council 4, 3 (Vice- 
Chairman 4); Orientation 4, 3; Kappa Pi 3; Ed. Banquet 3 (Chair- 
man); Prom Committee 2 (Co-Chairman); Ricci Math Academy 
4, 3, 2; Inter-Class Skits 4, 3, 2. 



MARIE B. DICKSON 

2 Bringham Road, Framingham, Massachusetts 

B.S. Business Education — St. Mark's Academy 4, 3,2, 1 ; W.R.A. 
4, 3, 2, 1; Jr. Show; Inter-Class Skits 4, 3; Dean's List. 



MARY E. DILLON 

66 Plympton Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education — Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 1; W.R.A. 
4, 3, 2, 1; Orientation 3; Commencement Committee 3; Dean's List. 




BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 





MARY ANN DiMARIO 

136 Windmill Street, Providence, Rhode Island 

B.S. Elementary Education— Sailing Club 2, 1; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Inter-Class Skits 2; Rhode Island Club 4, 3, 2; Pope Pius XII 
Academy 4, 3, 2. 



MAUREEN J. DONNELLAN 

40 Century Street, Medford, Massachusetts 
B.S. Elementary Education— Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 3, 2; W.R.A. 
4, 3, 2; Glee Club; Commencement Committee 3; Inter-Class 
Skits 4; Sub Turri 4, 2; Pius XII Academy 4; Dean's List. 



289 




GRACE V. ENOS 

6 Thurston Street, East Boston, Massachusetts 
B.S. Elementary Education— W .R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Bl. Oliver Plunkett 
Society 3, 2, 1; Jr. Week Committee; Pius XII Academy 4, 3. 



ROBERT L. FERREIRA 

16 Hull Street, Boston, Massachusetts 
B.S. English — Dean's List. 



PAULA HELEN FITZGERALD 

120 Day Street, Newton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Business Education — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1 (Secretary 2); St. Mark's 
Academy 4, 3, 2, 1; Jr. Show; W.R.A. 2, 1; Prom Committee 2; 
Sub Turri 4. 





t" :ir 



REGINA P. FOLEY 

111 Milton Avenue, Hyde Park, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education — W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Women's Rifle Team 
2; Pius XII Academy 4, 3. 





PATRICIA E. FORRY 

783 East Fourth Street, South Boston, Massachusetts 

B.S. History— W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Skits 4, 3, 2; Bellarmine Law and 
Govt. Academy 3; Jr. Show; Dean's List. 



dim 



ROLAND W. GOLDEN 

25 Aspinwall Road, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
B.S. English 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 





ANN M. GORMAN 
131 Soffore Street, Hyde Park, Massachusetts 
B.S. Elementary Education — W.R.A. 4, 3, 2. 



MARY T. GRAY 

67 Cottage Street, Everett, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education— W.R.A. 4, 3, 2; Pius XII Academy 4, 3 
(President 4); Psychology Club 4, 3; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 
4, 3; Jr. Show; Inter-Class Skit 3; Jr. Week Committee; Dean's List. 



STEPHANIE A. GREGORY 

113 South Eighth Street, Vineland, New Jersey 

B.S. Biology — Sodality 4, 3, 2 (Treasurer 3); Alpha and Omega 4; 
Mendel Club 4, 3; Prom Committee 2; Jr. Week Committee; Psy- 
chology Club 2; Inter-Class Skits 3, 2; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Dean's List. 




JOHN F. HANLON 

69 Centre Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 

B.S. History— -Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3,2, 1 ; Celtic Society 
4, 3, 2, 1; Inter-Class Skits 4, 3, 2. 





JAMES W. HEGARTY 

183 Liberty Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 
B.S. History — Intramural 3, 2, 1; Inter-Class Skits 3; Orientation 3. 



JOAN R. HINES 

4 Ware Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
B.S. Elementary Education — Sub Turri 4; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Inter- 
Class Skits 4, 3; W.V.B.C. 4, 3; Pius XII Academy 4; Commence- 
ment Committee 3; Jr. Week Committee. 



OWEN P. HUGHES 

646 Sherman Street, Canton, Massachusetts 
B.S. History — Hockey 4, 3, 2, 1; Orientation 3. 



JOAN D. HUNGERVILLE 

46 Pilgrom Road, Needham, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education—Class Rep. 2, 1; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Commencement Committee 3; Inter-Class Skits 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Jr. Show; 
Prom Committee 3. 





BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 





PAUL A. HURD 

1865 Washington Street, Holliston, Massachusetts 

B.S. History — Orientation 3, 2; Section Rep. 2, 1; Intramurals 3, 
2, 1 ; Inter-Class Skits 4, 3, 2. 



JOHN M. HURLEY 

5 1 Hillside Street, Roxbury, Massachusetts 

B.S. Business Education — Track Team 4, 3,2, 1 ; Cross Country 4, 
3, 2, 1; Kappa Pi 4, 3; Orientation 3; CCS. 3; Section Rep. 3. 



291 




PATRICIA J. JARAK 

26 Harvard Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
B.S. Biology— W.R.A. 3, 2, 1; Rifle Club 2; Mendel Club 3; Orien- 
tation 3, 2; Jr. Show; Inter-Class Skits 3; Basketball 3. 



ROBERT H. KEARNS 

51 Richmond Street, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

B.S. History— Intramurals 3, 2, I; Inter-Class Skits 4, 3; Kappa 
Pi 4, 3. 



CLAIRE M. KELLY 

467 Washington Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education — German Club 1; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Women's Glee Club 3; Inter-Class Skits 4, 3,2, 1; Jr. Show; Modern 
Dance Club 2; Psychology Club 2. 



PATRICIA M. KENNEY 

57 Pearl Street, Melrose, Massachusetts 
B.S. Mathematics— Glee Club 1; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1 (Prefect 3) 
W.R.A. 2, 1 ; Ricci Math Academy 3, 2; Class Officer (President 2) 
Student Senate 2 (Public Relations Secretary 2); Class Council 2. 
Women's Council 1; Orientation 3, 2; Alpha and Omega 4 (Presi- 
dent); Prom Committee 2 (Co-Chairman); Inter-Class Skits 4, 3. 
2, 1; Jr. Show (Co-Chairman); Commencement Committee 3 (Co 
Chairman); Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Dean's List. 






ANNA M. KICIN 

26 Maud Street, Torrington, Connecticut 

B.S. Mathematics — Sub Turri 4 (Senior Section Editor); Alpha and 
Omega 4; Ricci Math Academy 4, 3, 2, 1; Sodality 4, 3, 2; Class 
Officer 2 (Secretary); Student Senate 2; Class Council 2 (Secretary); 
Education Review 3, 2 (Co-Editor 3); Jr. Week Barn Dance Com- 
mittee (Chairman); Orientation 4, 3, 2; Connecticut Club 3, 2, 1; 
Jr. Show Committee; Prom Committee 4; Inter-Class Skits 4, 3, 2; 
W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Dean's List. 



ELIZABETH R. KULIG 

63 North Street, Three Rivers, Massachusetts 

B.S. Mathematics— Western Mass. Club 2, 1; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Ricci Math Academy 4, 3, 2, 1; Orientation 3; Inter-Class Skits 4. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



292 






CAROLE J. LALLY 

14 Barnard Road, Belmont, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education — W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Commencement 
Committee 3; Heights 2, 1; Basketball 2, 1; Rifle Club 1; Inter- 
Class Skits 3. 



ROY D. LeCLAIR 

261 Middlesex Street, North Andover, Massachusetts 

B.S. English— CCS. 3, 2, 1; Kappa Pi 4, 3, 2 (Public Relations 
Secretary 3); Inter-Class Skits 4, 3, 2; Psychology Club 1; Section 
Rep. 4; Orientation 3. 



MARGARET J. LEIGH 

Box 2994, Cristobal, Canal Zone 

B.S. Elementary Education — Class Officer 2 (Vice-President); Class 
Council 2; Senate 2 (Publicity Secretary); W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, J (Vice- 
President 3, President 4); Prom 2 (Co-chairman); Inter-Class Skits 
4, 3, 2, 1; Jr. Week Communion Breakfast 3 (Vice- Chairman); Jr. 
Show; Orientation 4, 3; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 3; Pius XII 
Academy 4; Dorm Council 4, 3 (President 3); Class Rep. 4. 



LORRAINE P. LIZOTTE 

Ridge Road, Sejosset, New York 

B.S. English— W.R.A. 2, 1; New York Club 2, 1 ; Psychology Club 
2, 1; Glee Club 3; Inter-Class Skits 4, 3, 2, 1. 






ANN M. LYNCH 

3 Paige Avenue, South Boston, Massachusetts 

B.S. Business Education — Sub Turri 4; St. Mark's Academy 4, 3, 2, 1 
(Secretary 3); Inter-Class Skits 4, 3, 2; Jr. Show; Commencement 
Week Committee 3; Orientation 3, 2; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Heights 2; 
Dean's List. 



MARIANNE B. LYNCH 

660 Columbia Road, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education— W .R. A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Bl. Oliver Plunkett 
Society 2; Inter-Class Skits 4, 3, 2, 1; Pius XII Academy 4, 3, 2. 



DANIEL V. MacDONALD 

36 Adams Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

B.S. History— Track 3, 2, 1; Inter-Class Skits 4, 3, 2; Kappa Pi 4, 3; 
Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 




ma~ w 



ROBERT J. MACOL1NI 

60 Sycamore Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 
B.S. Elementary Education — Inter-Class Skits 2. 



I 




BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 




■W 




EDMUND T. MADDEN, JR. 

71 Euston Road, Brighton, Massachusetts 

B.S. English — Sub Turri 4; Class Officer 2 (Treasurer); Student 
Senate 2; Class Council 2; Orientation 3; Campus Council 3 (Vice- 
Chairman). 



MARY E. MAHONEY 

39 West Town Street, Norwich, Connecticut 

B.S. Elementary Education — W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Connecticut Club 
3, 2, 1; Sailing Club 2, 1; Pius XII Academy 4, 3; Orientation 3, 2; 
Inter-Class Skits 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 



293 





VIRGINIA A. MAYWALT 

16 Moore Avenue, Worcester, Massachusetts 
B.S. History 



JEANNE L. MCCARTHY 

19 Wright Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education — W.R.A.<4, 3, 2, I; Inter-Class Skits 4, 
3, 2, 1 ; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 2; Jr. Show; Sub Turri 2. 



FRANCES E. McCAULEY 

191 Huron Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education— VI. R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Bl. Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4, 3; Pius XII Academy 4; Better Relations Committee 4, 3; 
Inter-Class Skits 3; Commencement Committee 3; Dean's List. 



PHYLLIS A. McCORMACK 

71 Fenno Street, Wollaston, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education — Sodality 1; Golf Club 1; Psychology 3; 
W.R.A. 4, 3, 1; Jr. Week Committee; Jr. Show; Commencement 
Committee 3; Prom Committee 4; Pius XII Academy 4, 3, 1 
(Treasurer 4). 







KATHERINE M. McGOWAN 

9 Maple Street, Lexington, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education — W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; French Academy 2; 
Commencement Committee 3; Pius XII Academy 4, 3; Section 
Rep. 2; Dinner Dance 2; Dean's List. 



VERONICA E. McLOUD 

14 Maple Park, Newton Centre, Massachusetts 

B.S. Mathematics — Alpha and Omega 4; Women's Sodality 4, 3, 
2, 1 (Vice-Prefect 3); Ricci Math Academy 4, 3, 2 (Secretary 4); 
Women's Glee Club 1 ; Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Dean's List. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



294 





GERARD R. MILLER 

12 Peacevale Road, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

B.S. History— Inter-Class Skits 4, 3, 2, 1; Section Rep. 4, 3, 1; 
Kappa Pi 4, 3; Prom Committee 1; Orientation 3; Jr. Week Barn 
Dance Committee; Victory Dance Chairman 4. 



MARGARET C. MORAN 

125 Greenfield Road, Matapan, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education— W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Bl. Oliver Plunkett 
Society 2; Pius XII Academy 4. 



ANNE L. MULKERIN 

80 Margaret Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 

B.S. History— W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Psychology Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Bl. 
Oliver Plunkett Society 2, 1 ; Bellarmine Law and Govt. Academy 4. 



CORNELIUS P. MURPHY 

408 Pleasant Street, Dracut, Massachusetts 
B.S. English— Kappa Pi 4, 3; Dean's List 3, 1. 






ANNA M. NOON 

11 Beaufort Street, Providence, Rhode Island 

B.S. French— Rhode Island Club 3, 2; French Club 3, 2; Inter-Class 
Skits 3; Education Review 2. 



SHEILA A. NUGENT 

21 Wellesley Avenue, Wellesley, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education — Women's Council 4, 3, 2, 1 (Secretary 
3, 2, President 4); Orientation 3, 2 (Co-Chairman 2, Chairman 3); 
Commencement Committee 3; Inter-Class Skits 4, 3; Jr. Show; 
Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 1; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Public Relations 
Committee 3; Alumni Committee 3, 2; Alpha and Omega 4 (Sec- 
retary-Treasurer 4); Pius XII Academy 4; Section Rep. 2; Dean's 
List. 



JOANNE M. O'BRIEN 

320 Wentworth Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 

B.S. French— Writer's Workshop 1; Inter-Class Skits 4, 3, 2, 1; 
French Club 3, 1; Psychology Club 3; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 
2, 1; SubTurri4. 





MAUREEN V. O'BRIEN 

215 Corey Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

B.S. English— Dramatic Society 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 3, 1; Skits 4, 
2, 1; Jr. Show; Orientation 3, 2. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 





PAULINE G. O'HARA 

5 Scott Road, Belmont, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education — W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Jr. Show; Prom 
Committee 4. 



VIRGINIA M. O'NEIL 

60 Burton Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education — Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 3, 1 ; French 
Academy 2; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Jr. Week Pops Committee; Pius XII 
Academy 4. 



295 




JANICE C. PEZZELLA 

832 Broadway, Everett, Massachusetts 
B.S. Elementary Education — Dean's List. 



MARY E. POWERS 

70 Templeton Parkway, Watertown, Massachusetts 

B.S. Mathematics— Glee Club 1 ; Ricci Math Academy 3, 2; W.R.A. 
4, 3, 2, 1; Inter-Class Skits 3, 2; Dean's List. 



HENRY F. QUILL 

6 Nelson Street, Winchester, Massachusetts 
B.S. History— Inter-Class Skit 4, 3; Victory Dance Committee 4. 



KEVIN M. QUINLAN 

58 Bostonia Avenue, Brighton, Massachusetts 
B.S. History — W.R.L. 4; Orientation 3; Intramurals 1; Dean's List. 







HENRY P. RAMETTE 

25 Elm Street, Melrose, Massachusetts 

B.S. History— Young Democrats Club 3,2,]; Bl. Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4, 3, 2, 1; Foreign Relations League 3; Jr. Show; Intra- 
murals 3, 2, 1; Inter-Class Skits 3, 2, 1; Basketball Manager. 



LOUISE G. ROTH 

65 DePeyster Avenue, Tenafly, New Jersey 

B.S. Mathematics — Alpha and Omega 4; Ricci Math Academy 4, 
3,2,1; New York Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Honors Program 3 2; Dean's List. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 




296 




ANNE L. ROUSE 

117-14 Union Turnpike, Kew Gardens, New York 

B.S. Elementary Education — Class Officer 3 (Treasurer); Student 
Senate 3 (Treasurer); Class Council 3; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Inter-Class 
Skits 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Orientation 4, 3, 2; Sub Turri 4; Pius XII Academy 4. 



MARGARET A. RYAN 

12 Lyne Road, Brighton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education — W.R.A. 4, 3,2, 1 ; Psychology Club 3 
Commencement Committee 3; Jr. Show; Pius XII Academy 4 
Class Officer 1 (Secretary); Student Senate 1 ; Class Council 1 
Dean's List. 



JUDITH C. SCALZI 

99 Farm Street, Providence, Rhode Island 

B.S. English— Educational Review 2, I; Inter-Class Skits 4, 3 (Di- 
rector); Alpha and Omega 4; Class Officer 2; Student Senate 2; 
Class Council 2; Orientation 3, 2; Prom Committee I; Jr. Week 
Committee; Honors Program 3, 2; Dean's List. 



MARY F. SHEA 

182 Hawthorne Road, Braintree, Massachusetts 

B.S. History— W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, I; Italian Club I; Psychology Club 
4, 3, 2; Jr. Show. 






ELIZABETH A. SHEEHAN 

33 Windsor Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 

B.S. English— W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, I; Psychology Club 2, I; Inter-Class 
Skits 4, 3, 2; Orientation 3; Jr. Show; Sailing Club 2; Ski Club 3; 
Sub Turri 4; Class Officer 3 (Vice-President); Student Senate 3; 
Class Council 3. 



WALTER S. SHIELDS 

200 Willow Avenue, Somerville, Massachusetts 

B.S. Mathematics — Intramurals 2, 1; Track 4, 3, 2, 1; Kappa Pi 
4, 3; Prom Committee 3; Inter-Class Skits 3; Sub Turri 4; Cross 
Country 3. 



PASQUALE J. SPINOSA 

68 Willow Avenue, Somerville, Massachusetts 

B.S. History — Intramurals 3, 2, 1; Orientation 3; Inter-Class Skits 
4, 3; Dean's List; Kappa Pi 4, 3. 




CAROLE S. SULLIVAN 

29 Backnum Street, Everett, Massachusetts 

B.S. History— W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Inter-Class Skits 4, 3; Commence- 
ment Committee 3. 





BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 





JOAN M. SULLIVAN 

10 Standisk Road, Milton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education — Psychology Club 3, 2; BI. Oliver Plunk- 
ett Society 3, 2, 1; Jr. Show; Inter-Class Skits 3; W.R.A. 3. 2, I; 
Jr. Week Committee; Pius XII Academy 4, 3, 2. 



RUTH E. SULLIVAN 

1 1 Glenham Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education— W. R. A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Bl. Oliver Plunkett 
Society 2, 1; Inter-Class Skits 4, 3, 2, 1; Pius XII 4; Prom Com- 
mittee 1. 



297 




RUTHANN SULLIVAN 

38 Williams Road, Reading, Massachusetts 

B.S. Biology— Orientation 3, 2; Basketball 3, 2, 1; Mendel Club 
3, 2; Rifle Club 2; Jr. Show. 



ELLEN M. TANGNEY 

16 Otis Street, Milton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education— W.R. A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Bl. Oliver Plunkett 
Society 1; Pius XII 4, 3; Basketball 2 1. 



PATRICIA A. TAYLOR 

9 Linden Street, Fitchburg, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education— Inter-Class Skits 4, 3, 2, 1 ; W.R.A. 2, 1 ; 
Psychology Club 2, 1; Western Mass. Club 2, 1; Bl. Oliver Plunket 
Society 2, 1; German Academy 1; Orientation 4, 3, 2; Prom Com- 
mittee 2; 3 (Co-Chairman 3); Jr. Show; Pius XII Academy 4; 
Heights 1; Alumni Committee 2. 



RICHARD L. TIVNAN 

75 Bowdoin Avenue, Waltham, Massachusetts 

B.S. Business Education — Band 4, 3, 2, 1; St. Mark's Academy 4, 3, 
2, 1 (Treasurer 2, President 3); Kappa Pi 4, 3; Cadet Officers Club, 
4, 3; CCS. 2; Orientation 3; Inter-Class Skits 3; Dean's List. 







MARY C. TURBINI 

192 Crafts Street, Newtonville, Massachusetts 

B.S. Mathematics— Sub Turri 4; Ricci Math Club 4, 3, 2, 1; W.R.A. 
4, 3, 2, 1; Orientation 3, 2; Sodality 4, 3, 2; Women's Council 4, 3 
(Vice-President 4, Treasurer 3); Inter-Class Skits 4, 3, 2; Jr. Show; 
Jr. Week Barn Dance Committee; Commencement Committee 3; 
Prom Committee 4 (Co-Chairman); Dean's List. 



ROSALIE A. VENTRESCA 

68 Richfield Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

B.S. English— Inter-Class Skits 4, 3, 2, 1; Psychology Club 2; 
Women's Glee Club 3, 2; Women's Sodality 2; English Academy; 
Dramatic Society 2, 1; W.R.A. 2, 1. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 





PETER F. WALDRON 

591 Morton Street, Dorchester 24, Massachusetts 

B.S. History— Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 2, 1; Inter-Class Skits 
4, 3, 2, 1; Psychology Club 2, 1. 



DEANNA M. WALLACE 

North Shore Drive, Danvers, Massachusetts 

B.S. Elementary Education— W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Inter-Class Skits 4, 
3, 2; Prom Committee 4; Jr. Show. 



ELIZABETH A. WALLACE 

27 Liberty Street, Beverly, Massachusetts 

B.S. Business Education — Sub Turri 4; Saint Marks Academy 4, 3, 
2, 1 (Vice-President 3); Rifle Club 3; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Inter-Class 
Skits 4, 3, 2; Jr. Show; Mardis Gras 3. 



DAVID C. WILSON 

12 Loring Avenue, Winchester, Massachusetts 

B.S. History — Inter-Class Skits 4, 3; Intramurals 3, 2, 1; Dean's 
List. 






EDMUND J. WINSLOW 

637 Washington Avenue, Albany 4, New York 

B.S. History— W.R.L. 4, 3; Young Democrats Club 3, 2, 1; Kappa 
Pi 4, 3; Intramurals 2, 1; Semper Fidelis Club 4; Inter-Class Skits 
2, 1. 





BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 





COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Senior Class Officers — Paul Brennan, Sec- 
retary; Christopher Flynn, Moderator; 
Thomas Hynes, Vice President; Edward 
Bell, A. A. Representative; George Downey, 
Treasurer; James Murray, President. 




300 




GUV L. ABBATE 

54 Lull Street, Islington, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — A.M.E. 4; Marketing Club 3, J; 
Toastmasters' Circle 2; Voting Democrats Club 4. 



CHARLES R. ALCOTT 

44 Longfellow Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Section Rep. I ; Accounting Acad- 
emy J; Economics Academy I; Marketing Club 4, 3, 2, I; Toast- 
masters' Circle 4, 3 (Treasurer 4). 



JOHN P. AMARAL 

20 Memorial Road, Somerville, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — C.B.A. Debating Club 2; Accounting Academy 
4, 3, 2; Honors Program 4, 3; Sodality 3, 2; Dean's List. 




ANTHONV L. ANDERSON 

57 Elmhurst Road, Newton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Industrial Management — Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3; Heights 3, 2 
(Business Manager 3); S.A.M. 4; Toastmasters' Circle 4; Dinner 
Dance Committee 2; Prom Committee 2; Junior Week Jazz Night 
Committee 3; Section Rep. 2. 



i 1 ^fc 





JOHN P. ARNOLD 

76 Taft Avenue, White River Junction, Vermont 

B.S. Accounting — Drill Team 2, 1; Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3; Accounting 
Academy 4, 3; Intramurals 1. 



A. PAUL ARRUDA 

Colebrook Road, Little Compton, Rhode Island 

B.S. Distribution Management — Delta Sigma Pi 2; A.M.E. 
ness Club 1; Drill Team 1. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



PHILIP B. ATKINSON, JR. 

Box J70, Bar Mills, Maine 

B.S. Accounting — Dormitory Rep. J; Accounting Academy 4, 3; 
Young Democrats Club 4; Dean's List. 



VERNON N. BALSER 

1093 Main Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance — Business Club 2; Finance Club 4, 3; Sailing Club 
4, 3; Dean's List. 




ERNEST A. BARBARIS 

195 Boulevard, Glen Rock, New Jersey 

B.S. Finance— Football 1; Finance Club 4, 3; New York Club I; 
Toastmasters' Circle 4; Dean's List. 



RICHARD J. BARRETT 

11 Bynner Street, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 3; Prom Commit- 
tee 2 (Vice-Chairman); Commencement Committee; A.M.E. 4. 









WILLIAM J. BARRETT 

509 Pleasant Street, Melrose, Massachusetts 
B S. Industrial Management — Intramurals 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 



PETER J. BARRY 

750 Howard Avenue, Copiague, New York 

B.S. Finance — Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3; Finance Club 4, 3; New York 
Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Sub Turri 4. 



EDWARD F. BELL, JR. 

105 Palfrey Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance — Band 4, 3, 2, 1 (President 4, Secretary 3); Section 
Rep. 3; Athletic Association Rep. 4; Track 2, 1; Cadet Officers 
Club 3; Finance Club 4, 3, 2; Student Senate 4. 





~*K 



JAMES A. BISHOP 

Prout Hill Road, Middletown, Connecticut 

B.S. Accounting — Sub Turri 4 (Accountant); Beta Gamma Sigma 
4, 3; Accounting Academy 4, 3, 2; Connecticut Club 3, 2; Varsity 
Rifle Team 4, 3, 2 (Captain 4, Executive Officer 2); Boston College 
Rifle Club 4, 3, 2 (President 4, Treasurer 3); Honors Program 4, 
3, 2; Intramurals 3, 1; Dean's List. 





COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



302 



■ 




PHILLIP A. BISTANY 

58 Nesmith Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; Bellarmine 
Law and Govt. Academy 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



ROBERT G. BRANCA 

35 Whipple Court, North Providence, Rhode Island 

B.S. Industrial Management — Rhode Island Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Vice- 
President 4); Football 4, 3, 2, 1; S.A.M. 4; Italian Academy 4; 
Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 




ARTHUR J. BREAULT 

1 1 I Street, South Boston, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; Accounting Academy 4, 3; 
Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3. 



PAUL E. BRENNAN 

28 Pond Street, Milton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance— Class Officer 4 (Secretary); Student Senate 4; Class 
Council 4; Cadet Officers Club 3; Finance Club 4, 3, 2 (Vice-Presi- 
dent 4, Treasurer 3); Young Democrats Club 2; Marketing Club 2; 
Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



JAMES W. BRINE 

179 Larch Road Cambridge, Massachusetts 
B.S. Accounting 



JOSEPH Z. BROWN 

165 Long Street, Warwick, Rhode Island 

B.S. Finance— Rhode Island Club 4, 3, 2; Finance Club 4, 3; Track 
Team 2, 1. 







ROBERT F. X. BUCK 

1 Fairfax Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Prom Committee 1 ; Cadet Officers Club 4, 3; Ac- 
counting Academy 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



JAMES J. BUCKLEY 

22 Jean Road, Arlington, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3, 2; Journal of Business 
4; Sub Turri 4; Jr. Show; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



TIMOTHY J. BUCKLEY 

618 Frederick Street, Ridgewood, New Jersey 

B.S. Distribution Management — Rod and Gun Club 4, 3; New York 
Club 4, 3; Rifle Team 1; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Marketing 
Club 4, 3; Intramurals. 



JOHN F. BURKE, JR. 

84 Lincoln Avenue, Quincy, Massachusetts 

B.S. Economics — Executive Seminar 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Toast- 
masters' Circle 4; Prom Committee 4 (General Chairman); Eco- 
nomics Academy 4, 3; Foreign Trade Club. 




Attfe 



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(l 






I 


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A 


mi 





303 



M. CHRISTOPHER CANAVAN, JR. 

770 Hancock Street, Wollaston, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Sub Turri 4 (Sports Editor); Accounting Acad- 
emy 4, 3; Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3 (Vice-President 4); Honors Program 
4, 3, 2; Commencement Day Committee 3; Student Sponsor 4; Jr. 
Show 3; Prom Committee 2; Dean's List. 



CHARLES M. CAPUTO 

1730 Columbia Road, South Boston, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Lewis Drill Team 3, 2, 1; Accounting Academy 
4, 3; Italian Academy 4, 3; Cadet Officers Club 4, 3; Football 1; 
Journal of Business 4. 





ilk M 





I m \m 




JOHN D. CARR 

27 Corinne Road, Brighton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — A.M.E. 4, 3 (President 4); Honors 
Program; Toastmasters' Circle 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Dean's List. 



RALPH M. CARVALHO, JR. 

285 Mystic Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 
5.5. Finance — Finance Club 4. 



HUGH J. CAVANAUGH 

67 Knoll Street, Waterbury, Connecticut 

B.S. Distribution Management — German Academy I ; Connecticut 
Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Treasurer 4, 3); Jr. Week Pops Committee; Honors 
Program 4, 3, 2; A.M.E. 4; Dean's List. 



ROBERT J. CHAISSON 

64 Robbins Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 
B.S. Economics — Student Rep. 4, 3, 2; Young Democrats Club 4, 
3, 2; Italian Academy 4, 3; Sub Turri 4; Student Sponsor 4, 3; 
Prom Committee 4; Foreign Trade Club 4, 3, 2 (President); Eco- 
nomics Academy 4, 3; Dean's List. 






ill 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



304 




JOHN L. CHIMINIELLO 

55 Keating Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Italian Club 4; University Com- 
mittee 3; Cadet Officers Club 4, 3; Rifle Club 1 ; Honors Program 2; 
Dean's List. 



DIEGO A. CISNEROS 

P. O. Box 1615, Caracas, Venezuela 
B.S. General Business — Dramatic Society 3, 2; Spanish Academy 
3, 2; Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3; Dean's List. 




PHILIP G. CLARK 

285 Washington Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 
B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Dean's List. 



RAYMOND M. CLINTON, JR. 

71 Harwood Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3, 2; Bellarmine Law 
and Govt. Academy 3; Dean's List. 








PAUL E. CLANCY 

22 Wellington Street, Brockton, Massachusetts 
B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3. 



JOHN H. CLARK 

22 Humphrey Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3 (President 4); Delta 
Sigma Pi 4, 3; Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Executive Seminar 3; 
Dean's List. 




iffcfci 



JAMES J. COLBERT 

20 Latin Road, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 
3, 2; Marketing Club 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



JAMES R. COLLINS 

19 Alpheus Street, Roslindale, Massachusetts 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Cadet Officers Club 3; 
Intramurals. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



JAMES W. COLLINS 

90 Cleveland Street, Melrose, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Football 1; Rod and Gun Club 4, 
3 (Secretary); A.M.E. 4, 3; Intramurals 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 



KEVIN J. COLLINS 

327 North Harvard Street, Allston, Massachusetts 

B.S. Economics — Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3 (Master of Ritual); Sub 
Turri 4 (Senior Editor); Foreign Trade Club 4. 




THOMAS P. CONATY, JR. 

15 Nottingham Drive, Natick, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Mar- 
keting Club 4; Intramurals 1. 





FRANCIS J. CONCANNON 

9 Furnival Road, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

Journal of Business 1; A.M.E. 4, 3; 



B.S. Distribution Management 
S.A.M. 4. 







THOMAS B. CONCANNON 

279 Linwood Avenue, Newtonville, Massachusetts 

B.S. Economics — Toastmasters' Circle 4, 2; Accounting Academy 
2; Commencement Committee 3;. Jr. Week Committee 3; Prom 
Committee 4 (Co-Chairman); Young Democrats 4; Cadet Officers 
Club 4, 3; Foreign Trade Club 4 (Vice-President). 





JOHN P. CONROY 

31 Martin Road, Milton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Honors Program 3; 
Dean's List. 



THOMAS F. COPP, JR. 

172 Edinboro Street, Newtonville, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Business Club 2; Accounting Academy 4, 3; 
Toastmasters' Circle 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



LOUIS S. CORSINI 

107 Russett Road, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Bellarmine Law and Govt. Academy 1 ; Rod and 
Gun Club 1; Accounting Academy 1; Intramurals 4, 1; Young 
Republicans Club 1. 




COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 






JOHN W. COSCO 

110 Prescott Avenue, Chelsea, Massachusetts 
B.S. Management— BI. Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3; S.A.M. 4, 3. 



JOHN B. COSTELLO 

40 Taber Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island 

B.S. Distribution Management — Rhode Island Club 4, 3, 2 (Treas- 
urer 4); Journal of Business 4; Prom Committee 2; Rod and Gun 
Club 1. 




FRANCIS X. CRONIN 

40 Corinthian Road, Somerville, Massachusetts 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3; Foreign Trade Club 4 
(Secretary); Italian Academy 4; Rod and Gun Club 4; Prom Com- 
mittee 4; Young Democrats Club 4, 3; Ricci Math Club 4; Football 
4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3; Dean's List. 



JAMES J. CROWLEY, JR. 

68 Redlands Road, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Semper Fidelis Society 4, 3, 2, I; 
A.M.E. 4, 3 (Vice-President 4); Toastmasters' Circle 4. 



JOSEPH T. CROWLEY, JR. 

34 Warren Avenue, Woburn, Massachusetts 

B.S. Economics — Foreign Trade Club 4; Omicron Chi Epsilon 4; 
Dean's List. 




EUGENE G. CUMMINGS 

185 Russett Road, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Business Club J ; Marketing Club 
2; Intramurals 4; S.A.M. 1. 




■K^ffet 




FRANCIS B. CURLEY 

60 Dustin Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Economics — Intramurals 4, 3, 2, l;Economics Academy 4, 3; 
Prom Committee 4; Italian Academy 4, 3; Foreign Trade Club 4; 
Dean's List. 



JOHN C. CURTIN 

19 Dorset Road, Belmont, Massachusetts 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3 (Vice-President 4); Jr. 
Show 3; Rod and Gun Club 4; Phi KappaTheta4, 3, 2; Intramurals 
4, 3, 2, 1. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



WILLIAM A. CURTIN, JR. 

101 North Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 
B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



THOMAS G. DAHONEY 

142 Maple Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Semper Fidelis Society 4, 3 (Presi- 
dent 4); A.M.E. 4; Toastmasters' Circle 3; Intramurals 2, 1; Busi- 
ness Club 2, 1. 




307 



JOSEPH C. DeFRANCO 

86 East Cottage Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Honors Program 4, 2; Beta Gamma Sigma 4; 
Toastmasters' Circle 4; Accounting Academy 4; Student Sponsor 4; 
Dean's List. 




RICHARD M. DelCOLLE 

64 Regina Road, Lynn, Massachusetts 







RAYMOND J. DEMPSEY 

94 Greenleaf Avenue, Waterbury, Connecticut 
B.S. Accounting 




ROBERT W. DENSMORE 

66 Hamilton Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 
B.S. Distribution Management — Business Club 2; A.M.E. 4, 3; Com- 
mencement Committee 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 



ROBERT M. DERBA 

5 Barbara Lane, Medford, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Glee Club 3, 2, 1; Band 4, 2, 1; 
Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3, 2; Campus Council 2; Class Officer 2 (Presi- 
dent); Student Senate 2; Class Council 2 (Chairman); Toastmas- 
ters' Circle 3, 2; Accounting Academy 2; Commencement Week 3; 
Sub Turri 4 (Advertising Manager); Intramurals 4, 3, 2, I. 





JOHN J. DeSALVO 

249 Walker Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

B.S. Industrial Management — Psychology Club 4, 3; Italian Acad- 
emy 4; S.A.M. 4. 




COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 





■A 



M 



FERNANDO A. DilANNI 

32 Hamlin Avenue, Medford, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance — Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Beta Gamma Sigma 4, 3; 
Italian Academy 4, 3, 2, 1 (Treasurer 4); Dean's List. 



NINO DilANNI 

9 Minnesota Avenue, Somerville, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Italian Academy 4, 3, 
2, 1 (President 4, Vice-President 3); Intramurals 4, 3. 




PAUL A. DiPASQUALE 

59 Irving Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3 (Membership Commit- 
tee 4); Intramurals 4, 3; Italian Academy 4; Young Democrats 
Club 4; Prom Committee 4; Rod and Gun Club 4, 3; Foreign Trade 
Club 4, 3 (Treasurer 4). 



ALBERT F. DOHERTY 

7 Shawmut Street, W. Quincy, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Toastmasters' Circle 4, 3, 2, 1; C.B.A. Debating 
2; Ski Club 4, 2; Accounting Academy 4, 3, 2; Photo Club 1; 
Journal of Business 3; Dean's List. 



JOHN L. DOHERTY 

38 Royal Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 
B.S. Distribution Management 



EDWARD T. DOLAN 

3506 Washington Street, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — A.M.E. 4, 3, 2; Gold Key Society 
4; Heights Staff 3; Track 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 





WALTER C. DOLAN 

10 Greenleaf Road, Milton, Massachusetts 



B.S. Finance 



PHILIP P. DONAHUE 

109 Peterborough Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Section Rep. 4; Marketing Club 4, 
3; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 3; Sailing Club 4; Jr. Show; Cadet 
Officers Club 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



JOHN G. DONOVAN 

45 Hartsuff Street, Rockland, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — A.M.E. 4; Bellarmine Law and 
Govt. Academy 3; Business Club 2, 1; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 2; 
Intramurals 2, 1 ; Dean's List. 



GEORGE A. DOWNEY 

39 Bradford Road, Milton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Class Officer 4, 1 (Treasurer 4, Vice-President 1 ) 
Class Council 4 (Treasurer); Student Senate 4, 1; Section Rep. 3, 1 
Jr. Show (Co-Chairman); Orientation 4, 3; Dance Committee 3 
Prom Committee 1; Accounting Academy 4, 3, 2; Rod and Gun 
Club 4, 1; Rifle Club 4, 1. 




'I " 2 * r ' «Bpk 



309 



WILLIAM H. DOWNEY 

239 Huron Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Rod and Gun Club 4, 3 (Presi- 
dent 4). 



RICHARD M. DOYLE 

33 Barton Hill Road, Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

B.S. Industrial Management — Business Club 2; Cadet Officers Club 
4, 3; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3; S.A.M. 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 
2, 1; Commencement Committee 3; Student Sponsor 4. 






EDWARD W. DUFFY 

157 Mills Avenue, Revere, Massachusetts 
B.S. Accounting — Toastmasters' Circle 4; Accounting Academy 4, 3. 



DAVID L. DUGAN 

17 Carleton Street, Brockton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Economics — Sub Turri 4 (Activities Editor); Journal of Busi- 
ness 4, 3; Economics Academy 4, 3, 2; Bellarmine Law and Govt. 
Academy 4, 3; Prom Committee 3; Jr. Show; Public Affairs Forum 
4; Intramurals 3, 2, 1; Foreign Trade Club 4. 



ROBERT L. EDWARDS 

124 Terrace Avenue, Winthrop, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 3, 2; Business Club 1; 
Accounting Academy 4, 3, 2; Toastmasters' Circle 4, 3, 2; Jr. Show; 
W.R.L. 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 



HENRY J. EGAN 

73 Melrose Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Class Officer 1 (Treasurer); Student Senate 1; 
Class Council 1; Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3, 2; Honors Program 4, 3; 
Prom Committee 2(Co-Chairman); Jr. Week; Dean's List. 




COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 





RAYMOND J. FALVEY 

2437 Lyvere Street, Bronx, New York 
B.S. Finance— Basketball 3, 2, 1. 



ROBERT L. FAMIGLIETTI 

222 Main Street, Walpole, Massachusetts 
B.S. Finance — Hockey 4, 3, 2, 1; Finance Club 4, 3. 





ROBERT J. FARRY 

135 Lincoln Street, Newton Highlands, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance — Rod and Gun Club 4, 3 (Vice-President 4); Finance 
Club 4, 3. 



FRANK FIORENTINO 

63 George Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Sub Turri 4; Accounting Academy 4, 3; Cadet 
Officers Club 4, 3; Italian Academy 4; Student Sponsor 4; Dean's 
List. 



ANGELO R. FISICHELLA 

25 Albion Street, Methuen, Massachusetts 

B.S. General Business — Drill Team 4, 3, 2, 1; Young Republicans 
Club 4; Dorm Rep. 4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 2, 1. 



ROBERT J. FITZGERALD 

73 Sydney Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; Rod and Gun 
Club 4, 3; Accounting Academy 2; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 





JOSEPH J. FITZPATRICK, JR. 

70 Hillside Street, Roxbury, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Bl. Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4. 



KEVIN T. FITZPATRICK 

72 Winthrop Street, Charlestown, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance — Debating Society 2, 1; Finance Club 4, 3; Rod and 
Gun Club 4, 3. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



RICHARD H. FITZPATRICK, JR. 

15 Hathaway Road, Lexington, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance — Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3, 2; 
Class Officer 3, 1 (Treasurer 3, Secretary 1); Student Senate 3, 1; 
Class Council 3, 1; ToastmastersI Circle 4, 3, 2 (Vice-President 4, 
Treasurer 3); Dean's List. 

ROBERT E. FLAHERTY 

20 Appleton Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Toastmasters' Circle 4; Alpha 
Kappa Psi 4, 3. 




M.Ak 




JOHN T. FLATLEY 

85 Milton Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Intramurals 4, 3, 2; Gold Key 1; Accounting 
Academy 4, 3, 2; Jr. Week; Toastmasters' Circle 4; Prom Com- 
mittee 4. 



PAUL F. FLYNN 

24 Elmore Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance — Gold Key Society 4, 3, 2 (President 4); Delta Sigma 
Pi 4, 3, 2; Public Affairs Forum 4; Toastmasters' Circle 4; Finance 
Club 4, 3; Election Committee 3, 2; Intramurals 1. 





ijJjSP^ 






CORNELIUS J. FOLEY, JR. 

59 Hill Street, Newburyport, Massachusetts 
B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 2. 



RONALD P. FONTAINE 

107 Conant Street, Danvers, Massachusetts 
B.S. Finance— Rod and Gun Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Finance Club 4, 3. 



ROBERT R. FOURNIER 

99 Cumberland Street, Woonsocket, Rhode Island 

B.S. Accounting — Toastmasters' Circle 2; Accounting Academy 4, 
3; Rhode Island Club 4, 3; S.A.M. 3, 2 (Secretary 3); Dean's List. 




STANLEY E. GABIS 

56 Pearl Street, Leominster, Massachusetts 
B.S. Finance— Football 3, 2, 1 ; Gold Key 3, 2. 



itfe 4 




COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 







W* 



it 



% Jigl 



A. JOHN GADA 

Fishers Island, Box 8, New York, New York 

B.S. Industrial Management — Honors Program 3, 2; Italian Acad- 
emy 4; S.A.M. 4; Rhode Island Club 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



EDWARD J. GAFFEY 

38A Dunbar Avenue, Medford, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3; 
Bellarmine Law and Govt. Academy 4; Intramurals 3, 2. 





*A 



JOHN M. GAFFNEY, JR. 

1405 Veale Road, Wilmington, Delaware 
B.S. Finance — Lewis Drill Team 4, 3, 2, 1; Finance Club 4, 2. 



THOMAS F. GANNON, JR. 

64 Cotting Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance— Band 4, 3, 2, 1 (Vice-President 4); Cadet Officers 
Club 4, 3; Finance Club 4, 3; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3; 
Sodality 4, 3; Rod and Gun Club 4; Track 4. 



NICHOLAS J. GIANTIS 

164 Faneuil Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 
B.S. Distribution Management — A.M.E. 4 ;Rod and Gun Club 1. 



RICHARD V. GIERE 

15 Bonmar Circle, Auburndale, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Hockey J.V. 4, 3, 2, 1; Accounting Academy 4, 
3; Sailing Team 4, 3; Toastmasters' Circle 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2. 1, 





RICHARD N. GILL 

355 Appleton Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 
B.S. Industrial Management— S.AM. 4, 3; Football 4, 3, 2, 1. 



RUSSELL B. GILLIS 

87 Porter Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Business Club 2, 1; Intramurals 
4, 3, 2, 1. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



RICHARD J. GLASHEEN 

2 Sutherland Road, Brighton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Business Club 2; Accounting Academy 4, 3; Cadet 
Officers Club 4, 3; Intramurals 2, 1. 



ARTHUR J. GORMAN, JR. 

18 Willard Street, Newton, Massachusetts 
B.S. Finance — Section Rep. 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 




MICHAEL V. GRACE 

Pine Hollow Road, East Norwich, New York 
B.S. Finance — Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 3, 2; Finance Club 3. 



WILLIAM J. GRANT 

867 East Broadway, South Boston, Massachusetts 
B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; J. V. Hockey ,4, 2. 






JAMES M. HALL 

29 Lewis Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Economics Academy 3; Dean's 
List. 



JOHN E. GREENE 

19 Pleasant Hill Avenue, Mattapan, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Prom Committee 2; Cadet Officers Club 4, 3 
(President 4); Lewis Drill Team 4, 3. 



M£* 



JOHN W. HAJOSY 

10 Morton Street, Niantic, Connecticut 

B.S. General Business — Sailing Club 3, 2, 1; Connecticut Club 4, 3, 
2, 1; Rod and Gun Club 4; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 3, 2; Intra- 
murals 3, 2, 1. 



RICHARD N. GRIECO 

50 William Street, Andover, Massachusetts 

B.S. Economics — Italian Academy 4, 3, 2, 1 (President 3); Eco- 
nomics Academy 4, 3; Spanish Academy 4, 3; Foreign Trade Club 
4; Prom Committee 4. 




^V" ^ 




life 



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COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 




314 



mA 




GERALD L. HAMEL 

1287 Briard Street, Wantagh, New York 

B.S. Distribution Management — Baseball 4, 3, 2; Track 2; A.M.E. 
4; New York Club 4, 3, 2. 



GREGORY P. HAMMOND 

43 Putnam Street, Beverly, Massachusetts 
B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Intramurals 1. 




GEORGE F. HANLON 

657 West Roxbury Parkway, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 
B.S. Distribution Management — A.M.E. 4, 3. 



ROBERT F. HANNON 

1423 Furnace Brook Parkway, Quincy, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Student Sponsor 4; Jr. Show; 
A.M.E. 4, 3; Sailing Team 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



C. JOSEPH HANSBERRY 

531/2 Wellington Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 
B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4; Hockey 1. 



NEIL T. HAROLD 

97 Claremont Avenue, Arlington, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — A.M.E. 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Dean's List. 






RICHARD L. HARRINGTON 

311 Beaver Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Section Rep. 3, 2; Freshman Orien- 
tation 4, 3, 2; A.M.E. 4; Economics Academy 3, 2; Commencement 
Committee 3 (General Chairman); Toastmasters' Circle 2; Class 
Officer 2 (Treasurer); Class Council 2; Student Senate 2; Intra- 
murals 1 ; Dean's List. 



ROBERT W. HARRINGTON 

620 Mystic Avenue, Somerville, Massachusetts 

B.S. Economics — Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Beta Gamma Sigma 4, 3; 
Dean's List. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



EDWARD A. HARRISON, JR. 

12 Marshall Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Hockey 2, 1; Bl. Oliver Plunkett 
Society; S.A.M. ; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



EDWARD D. HART 

32 Sunset Avenue, Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Glee Club 3; Jr. Show; Orientation 4, 3; Dean's 
List. 




ROBERT W. HATCH 

60 Windsor Road, Medford, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Beta Gamma Sigma 4, 
3; Accounting Academy 4, 3; Student Sponsor 4; Intramurals 3, 1; 
Dean's List. 



EDWARD R. HATHAWAY 

545 East Seventh Street, South Boston, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Academy 4, 3; Econom- 
ics Academy 3; Psychology Club 3. 





r" ■* 





FREDERICK D. HAYNES 

73 Martin Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Sub Turri 4 (Senior Sec. Editor); Alpha Kappa 
Psi 4, 3, 2 (Treasurer 4); Public Speaking 1; Cadet Officers Club 3; 
Accounting Academy 2; Student Sponsor 4; Dean's List. 



y» 




ROBERT J. HAZELTON 

7 Moulton Road, Arlington, Massachusetts 

B.S. Economics — Prom Committee 4; Economics Academy 4; Young 
Democrats; Foreign Trade Club; Italian Academy 4; Intramurals 
4,3. 



RICHARD L. HEALY 

35 Fayette Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Camera Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (President 4); Honors Pro- 
gram 4, 3, 2; Gold Key 4, 3, 2; Accounting Academy 4; Bl. Oliver 
Plunkett Society 1 ; Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3, 2 (Sr. Vice-President 4); 
Student Sponsor 4; Dean's List. 



JOHN J. HEHIR, JR. 

60 Bedell Avenue, Hempstead, New York 

B.S. Finance — Sub Turri 4 (Business Manager); Beta Gamma Sigma 
4, 3; Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Lewis Drill Team 3, 2, 1; Orientation 
4, 3, 2; Accounting Academy 2; New York Club 1 ; Student Sponsor 
4; Intramurals 1; Dean's List. 




COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 





WALTER F. HENNEBERRY, JR. 

21 Littlefield Road, Newton, Massachusetts 
B.S. Industrial Management — Heights Staff 3, 2. 



JOHN H. HESTER, JR. 

250 Linden Street, Wellesley, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Sailing Club 3; Jr. 
Show. 




GEORGE P. HINCHEY 

355 Essex Street, Salem, Massachusetts 

B.S. Industrial Management— S.AM. 4, 3; C.B.A. Debating So- 
ciety 2; Young Republicans Club 4; Intramurals 4, 3. 



DONALD F. HINES 

45 Maple Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Accounting Academy 
4, 3; Beta Gamma Sigma 4; Dean's List. 



CLIFTON G. HOEY 

85 Coolidge Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 
B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 3; Intramurals 3, 



ROBERT J HOULE 

2057 Commonwealth Avenue, Auburndale, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Cadet Officers Club 4, 3; Accounting Academy 
4, 3; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 





PATRICK J. HUGHES 

106 Rockland Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Sailing Team 4, 3, 2, 1 (Captain 4); 
A.M.E. 4 (Treasurer 4); Hockey 2. 



JOHN F. HURLEY 

157 Palmer Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 
B.S. Finance — Sailing Team 4, 3, 2, 1; Finance Club 4, 3. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



THOMAS J. HYNES, JR. 

28 Oriole Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

B.S. Industrial Management — Class Officer 4 (Vice-President); Stu- 
dent Senate 4; Sullivan Award Banquet (Chairman); Class Council 
4; Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3, 2 (Vice-President 4); Football 2, 1; Gold 
Key Society 4, 3; S.A.M. 4, 3; Orientation 4, 3; Jr. Week Com- 
munion Breakfast Committee; Prom Committee 2. 

FRANCIS X. JORDAN 

25 Houston Avenue, Milton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Bl. Oliver Plunkett So- 
ciety 4; Young Republicans Club 4; W.R.L. 4; Dean's List. 





JOHN F. KAVANAGH 

9 Prescott Street, Forge Village, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 
Commencement Committee 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 1. 



BERNARD J. KAZMIERCZAK 

4731 Milnor Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; W.R.L. 4; Public 
Speaking Club 4. 





'Spl** «**>*»*. 





JOHN E. KEEFE, JR. 

8 Adams Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 
B.S. Industrial Management— S.AM. 4, 3; Rifle Club 1. 



CLEMENT C. KELLY 

13 Spring Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3, 2; Journal of Business 
4, 3 (Layout Editor 4); Gold Key Society 3, 2; Sub Turri 4 (Layout 
Editor); Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 



RICHARD J. KELLY, JR. 

760 Worcester Road, Framingham, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3, 2; Band 4 
3, 2 (Manager); Junior Show; W.V.B.C. 4, 3. 



ROBERT J. KELLY 

75 Clayton Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

B.S. Economics — Sub Turri 4 (Sports Editor); Alpha Sigma Nu 4 
(Vice-President); Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3; Omicron Chi Epsilon 4, 3 
(President 4); Jr. Week (General Class Chairman); Class Officer 
(Vice-President 3, Secretary 2); Class Council 3, 2; Student Senate 
3, 2; Economics Academy 4, 3; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3, 2, 1 ; 
Toastmasters' Circle 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Dean's List. 




COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 





ROBERT M. KENNY 

240 Mystic Valley Parkway, Arlington, Massachusetts 

B.S. Economics — Sub Turri 4 (Activities Editor); Foreign Trade 
Club 4; Bellarmine Law and Govt. 3; Economics Academy 4, 3, 2; 
Accounting Academy 2. 



WILLIAM W. KINGSBURY 

175 Willoughby Street, Brooklyn, New York 

B.S. Distribution Management — Sub Turri 4; New York Club 4, 3, 
2, 1 (Vice-President 4); A.M.E. 4, 3; Dinner Dance 2; Basketball 1; 
Dorm Rep. 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 




ANDREW KUZMA 

Blair Road, Oyster Bay, New York 
B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; New York Club 2, 1. 



ROY A. LABESKY 

24 Windham Street, Hartford, Connecticut 

B.S. Industrial Management — Connecticut Club 4, 2, 
Dance 2; Psychology Club 3; S.A.M. 4; Intramurals 2. 



JOHN J. LALLY 

36 Atkins Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Economics— Economics Academy 4, 3, 2, 1 (Vice-President 4); 
Gold Key Society 2, 1; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3, 2; Toast- 
masters' Circle 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; Public Affairs Forum 4; 
Foreign Trade Club 4; Jr. Week Barn Dance Committee 3; Com- 
mencement Committee 3. 








HOWARD J. LANDERS, JR. 

356 Baker Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 
B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Election Committee 4. 






JOHN J. LANE 

163 Bartlett Road, Winthrop, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Dinner Dance 2 (Chairman); Prom 
Committee 3; Business Club 2 (Vice-President); A.M.E. 4; Cadet 
Officers Club 4, 3 (Vice-President 4); Commencement Committee 3; 
Military Ball Committee 4, 3 (Chairman 4, 3). 



JOHN V. LANE 

18 West Pine Street, Auburndale, Massachusetts 
B.S. Finance — Finance Club; Dean's List. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



WILLIAM P. LANE 

15 Austin Street, Milton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Cadet Officers Club 4, 3; Accounting Academy 
4, 3, 2; Jr. Show 3; Economics Academy 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Prom Committee 4. 



ROBERT J. LANG 

117 Third Street, Medford, Massachusetts 
B.S. Distribution Management 








319 



FRANCIS J. LARKIN 

12 Larkin Road, Brookline, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting— Hockey 4; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; C.B.A. Debating 
Society 3, 2; Accounting Academy 4, 3. 




JAMES O. LAWLER 

] 1 Gardner Street, Beverly, Massachusetts 
B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; Dean's List. 







JOHN C. LEARY 

18 Dawson Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Track and Field; Marketing Club 
4,3. 



AT M di " 



FRANCIS J. LeBLANC 

75 Washington Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 
B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Honors Program 3; Dean's List. 




JOSEPH C. LEARY, JR. 

24 Pinehurst Road, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Semper Fidelis Society 4 (Secre- 
tary); Bellarmine Law and Govt. Academy 3; Bl. Oliver Plunkett 
Society 3; Marketing Club 4, 3; Student Sponsor 4; Dean's List. 



ROBERT B. LEEBER 

18 Webster Street, Needham, Massachusetts 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3 (Secretary 4); Lewis Drill 
Team 4, 3, 2, 1; Military Ball Committee 3; Intramurals 4, 1. 




COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 





320 



mfk 






JOHN C. LEWIS 

423 Fern Street, West Hartford, Connecticut 

B.S. Distribution Management — Sub Turri 4; Connecticut Club 4, 
3,2, 1 ; Toastmasters' Circle 4; Dinner Dance 2; Track 1 ; Marketing 
Club 4; A.M.E. 4; Young Democrats Club 3. 



ROBERT E. LEWIS 

241 East Ninth Street, South Boston, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Football 1; Business Club 2, 1; 
Marketing Club 4, 3; Election Committee 4; Intramurals 2, 1. 





WARREN E. LEWIS 

71 Mountain Avenue, East Providence, Rhode Island 

B.S. Accounting— Football 4, 3, 2, 1; Rhode Island Club 4, 
Accounting Academy 4, 3; Dean's List. 




dth 



JOSEPH J. LIFRIERI 

77 Howard Avenue, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Beta Gamma Sigma 4, 3; Accounting Academy 
4, 3, 2; Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Dean's List. 



ROBERT W. LOCKE 

5 Summer Street, Newburyport, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Ski Team 4; Toast- 
masters' Circle 4; Prom Committee 3; Intramurals 4, 3. 



JAMES B. LOGUE 

9 Orient Avenue, Melrose, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Hockey 4, 3,2,]; Intramurals 4. 3, 
2, 1; Bl. Oliver -Plunkett Society 4, 3; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Marketing 
Club 4. 






JOHN J. LONERGAN 

21 Traincroft Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (President 4); 
Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3, 2; Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Jr. Week Com- 
mittee; Dean's List. 



: 




MICHAEL LONG, JR. 

166 Huckins Avenue, Quincy, Massachusetts 
B.S. Finance — Business Club 4, 3; Finance Club 4, 3; Dean's List. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



JOHN P. LYNCH 

1 Richartson Road, Peabody, Massachusetts 
B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 



JOSEPH A. MacDONALD 

333 Conant Road, Weston, Massachusetts 
B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4; Dean's List. 





321 



JOHN P. MAGUIRE 

57 Monument Avenue, Charlestown, Massachusetts 
B.S. Accounting — Intramurals 4, 2, I ; Accounting Academy 4. 



JOHN T. MAGURN 

845 Concord Pike, Arlington, Massachusetts 
B.S. Finance — Toastmasters' Circle 4; Finance Club 4, 3. 




MICHAEL F. MARTIN 

93 Chilson Avenue, Mansfield, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance — Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Finance Club 4, 3; Italian 
Academy 4; Dean's List. 




A « * 





KENNETH C. MAHER 

185 East Foster Street, Melrose, Massachusetts 
B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; Accounting 
Academy 2; Toastmasters' Circle 3; Hockey Team 4. 3, 2, 1; Sailing 
Team 4, 3; Section Rep. 3. 



PAUL MAILLOUX 

14 Edna Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Rod and Gun Club 4. 



ROBERT C. MARTIN 

352 Lowell Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance — Business Club 4, 3, 2; Finance Club 4, 3, 2; Baseball 
4, 3, 2 (Captain 3); Section Rep. 2. 




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322 



ii life 



THOMAS J. MARTIN 

115 Upland Road, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Hockey Team 4, 3, 2, 1; Baseball Team 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Toastmasters' Club 4, 3; Alpha Kappa Psi; Dean's List. 



DAVID W. MARTOWSKI 

31 Garfield Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 3; Semper Fidelis 
Society; A.M.E.; Honors Program 4; Student Sponsor; Dean's List. 





william j. McAllister 

62 Prentiss Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Bellarmine Law and 
Govt. Academy 4, 3; Dean's List. 



KHi A 



CHARLES A. McCARRON 

139 Bridge Street, Newton, Massachusetts 
B.S. Economics — Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; Economics Academy 4, 3. 



WILLIAM J. McCANN, JR. 

195 Dorchester Street, South Boston, Massachusetts 
t.S. Finance — Rod and Gun Club 4; Finance Club 4. 



allen j. McCarthy, jr. 

1180 Massachusetts Avenue, Arlington, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance — Gold Key 4, 3, 2; Business Club 2; Toastmasters' 
Circle 2; Finance Club 4, 3; Student Sponsor 4; Delta Sigma Pi 
4, 3; Intramurals 2, 1. 







edward j. Mcdonough 

28 Elm Street, Foxboro, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 2; Accounting Acad- 
emy 4, 3, 2; Toastmasters' Circle 4, 2; Intramurals 4, 2. 




john f. Mcdowell 

17 Mt. Pleasant Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Class Officer 3 (Secretary); Class Council 3; Stu- 
dent Senate 3; Toastmasters' Circle 4, 3, 2; Accounting Academy 
4, 3, 2; Business Club 2; Young Democrats Club 2; Section Rep. 4; 
Commencement Committee 3; Orientation 4, 3. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



KEVIN J. McGOLDRICK 

757 Dorchester Avenue, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
B.S. Economics — Dean's List. 



PAUL J. McINTIRE 

13 Mt. Vernon Street, No. Reading, Massachusetts 
B.S. Finance — Section Rep. 1; Cadet Officers Club 4, 3; Finance 




Club 4, 3. 



* it 




323 



VINCENT J. McKEEVER 

43 Lincoln Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
B.S. Distribution Management— Basketball 4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 2; 
Marketing Club 4. 



JOHN E. McMAHON 

18 Fairlawn Avenue, Milton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — A.M.E. 4, 3; Cadet Officers Club 
4, 3; Sodality 1. 








DONALD J. MILES 

11B Oak Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 
B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Dean's List. 



EDWARD J. MINGOLLA 

19 Blake Avenue, West Boylston, Massachusetts 

B.S. General Business — Italian Academy 4, 3 (Vice-President 4); 
Prom Committee 2; Finance Club 4; Economics Academy 4; Young 
Democrats Club 4. 



i*,M 



EDWARD E. MEARA 

15 Webster Street, So. Weymouth, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Sub Turri 4; Prom Committee 1 ; 
Class Officer 2 (Vice-President); Class Council 2; Student Senate 2; 
Orientation 3, 2; Toastmasters' Circle 4, 3; Young Democrats Club 
2; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; W.B.C.B. 3; Marketing Club 3; A.M.E. 4; 
Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3; Prom Committee 2. 



DAVID J. MELVILLE 

245 Cypress Street, Newton Centre, Massachusetts 

B.S. Industrial Management — Semper Fidelis Society 4, 3; S.A.M. 
4, 3; Jr. Week Communion Breakfast Committee (Chairman); Prom 
Committee 2; Rifle Club I; Sub Turri 4 (Social Chairman); Section 
Rep. 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 





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COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 




.*** •■•■ 




324 




M 1 » 



WILFRED E. MONTMINY 

29 Waldo Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4; Business Club 2, 1; Sodality 3, 2; 
Public Speaking 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, I. 



RICHARD J. MOONEY 

14 Quebec Court, Lynn, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting— Bellarmine Law and Govt. Academy 4, 3; Bl. 
Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3; Accounting Academy 4; Intramurals 
4, 2, 1 ; Dean's List. 




PETER J. MORGAN, JR. 

220 Corlies Avenue, Allenhurst, New Jersey 

B.S. Finance — Football 1; Ski Team 4; Finance Club 4, 3; Dorm 
Rep. 1. 



NICHOLAS C. MORIARTY 

134 Maple Street, Marlboro, Massachusetts 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3 (Treasurer 4); Gold Key 
4, 3, 1; Psychology Club 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; Beta Gamma 
Sigma 4; Dean's List. 



KEVIN F. MORRIS 

1721 Commonwealth Avenue, Brighton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; J.V. Hockey 
4, 3, 2; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 3, 2; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



PATRICK J. MULLEN 

54 Broadway, Arlington, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 3; Cadet Officers 
Club 4, 3. 





MxM 




£5& 




JOHN B. MURPHY 

23 Prospect Terrace, Maiden, Massachusetts 
B.S. Finance— Glee Club 4, 3, 2; Finance Club 4, 3; Dean's List. 





PAUL F. MURPHY 

2 Penn Road, Winchester, Massachusetts 

B.S. Economics — Cadet Officers Club 4, 3; Economics Academy 3; 
Foreign Trade Club 4. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



ROBERT J. MURPHY 

22 Edgebrook Road, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

B.S. Industrial Management — Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3; 
S.A.M. 4; C.B.A. Debating Society 2; Dean's List. 



JAMES T. MURRAY 

124 E. Madison Street, Sandusky, Ohio 

B.S. Economics — Class Officer 4, 3(President); Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 
3, 2; Toastmasters' Circle 4, 3, 2; Accounting Academy 2; Young 
Democrats Club 2; Public Affairs Forum 4; Victory Dance 3 
(Chairman); Dorm Rep. 3; Student Senate 4, 3 (Chairman 4, Vice 
Chairman 3); Class Council 4, 3. 




TliT* 





THOMAS E. NEARY 

6 Perry Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4; Intramurals 2; 
Dean's List. 





ROGER M. NELLIGAN 

6 Belle Avenue, Troy, New York 
B.S. Genera! Business — Rod and Gun Club 2; New York Club 1. 



dil fcfe 





ROBERT J NIEMIEC 

97 Bell Street, Chicopee, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance— Baseball 4, 3, 2, 1; Finance Club 4, 3, 2; Ski Team 4; 
Western Mass. Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Section Rep. 4, 3. 




JOHN E. NORTON 

106 Raymond Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Football 1; Marketing Club 3; 
Cadet Officers Club 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3; J. V. Hockey 3; Rod and 
Gun Club 4. 



JAMES J. NOVAK 

1435 Paulton Street, Johnstown, Pennsylvania 

B.S. Economics — Journal of Business 4, 3, 2; Stylus 1 ; Alpha Kappa 
Psi 4, 3, 2; Public Affairs Forum 4; Dean's List. 



JOHN H. NUGENT 

31 Ledyard Street, Wellesley, Massachusetts 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3 (Vice-President 4); Delta 
Sigma Pi 4, 3; Varsity Baseball 4, 3, 2 (Manager); Heights 4, 3; 
Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 






COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 




326 





RICHARD T. O'BRIEN 

83 Surrey Street, Medford, Massachusetts 
B.S. Accounting — Lewis Drill Team 4, 3, 2, 1; Cadet Officers Club 



4, 3; Intramurals 3; Track Team 3, 
Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4. 



1 ; Accounting Academy 4; 



BRIAN F. O'CONNELL 

154 Lynde Street, Melrose, Massachusetts 
B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 




JOHN R. O'CONNOR, JR. 

321 Main Street, Bristol, Connecticut 

B.S. Distribution Management — Spanish Academy 4; Marketing 
Club 4; Connecticut Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 



MICHAEL F. O'CONNOR 

241 Maple Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 
B.S. Accounting 



PAUL L. ODONNELL 

18 Miller Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3, 2 (Vice-President 4); 
Journal of Business 3, 2; Jr. Week Barn Dance Committee; Intra- 
murals 4, 3. 



DAVID E. OLIPHANT 

43 Carlton Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance— Glee Club 4; Business Club 2, I ; Cadet Officers Club 
3; Finance Club 4, 3. 





Aim 




DANIEL F. O'NEIL 

18 Lafayette Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 
B.S. Finance — Section Rep. 2; Finance Club 4, 3. 



JOHN P. O'NEILL 

44 Lewis Street, Newton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3; W.R.L. 4; Intramurals 
4,3,2, 1. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



ROBERT A. O'NEIL 

41 Kenilworth Road, Arlington, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3, 2 (President 4); 
Gold Key 4, 3 (Treasurer 4); A.M.E. 4, 3; Prom Committee 2; 
Dean's List. 



JOHN L. PALMER 

28 Highland Street, West Concord, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Business Club 2; 
Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Intramurals 1 ; Dean's List. 





'i^^ *^it\ 




HERBERT A. PAYONZECK 

1 1 Washington Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Business Club 1; 
Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 



DAVID G. PELLEY 

4 Griffin Road. Peabody, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3; Bellarmine Law 
and Govt. Academy 4, 3 (Secretary 4); Intramurals 4, 3, 2, I. 







ALBERT L. PELLINI 

237 Whitford Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island 

B.S. Distribution Management — Rhode Island Club 4, 3, 2; 
Club 4, 3; Marketing Club 4; Spanish Club 4. 






ROBERT PERREAULT 

52 Walnut Street, East Providence, Rhode Island 

B.S. Distribution Management — Football 4, 3, 2, 1; Rhode Island 
Club 4, 3, 2; Journal of Business 4; Marketing Club 4, 3; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



ROBERT L. PHELAN 

64 Prentiss Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Business Club 2, 1; Marketing Club 
4, 3; Intramurals 1. 




"■"»*: 



GEORGE D. POPE 

7 Grace Drive, Cohasset, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Cadet Officers Club 4; 
Student Sponsor 4; Jr. Show; Prom Committee 2; Intramurals 
4, 3, 2, 1 ; Dean's List. 





COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 




328 




tdr* 



PAUL R. POWERS 

87 Whitney Road, Medford, Massachusetts 

B.S. Economics — Gold Key 2; Commencement Committee 3; Jr. 
Week Committee 3; Cadet Officers Club 4, 3; Student Sponsor 4; 
Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Omicron Chi Epsilon 4, 3 (Secretary 4); 
Dean's List. 

JOHN D. PROVASOLI, JR. 

74 Park Avenue, Natick, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Sub Turri 4; Marketing Club 4, 3; 
Journal of Business 4, 3, 2 (Business Editor 4); Toastmasters' Club 
4, 3; Ski Team 4, 3, 2; Section Rep. 4, 3; Jr. Week Committee 3; 
Orientation 3. 




FRANCIS X. QUINN 

39 Mt. Vernon Street, Newport, Rhode Island 

B.S. General Business — Basketball 4, 3, 2 (Captain 4); Rhode Island 
Club 4, 2, 1; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 3, 2; W.R.L. 4; Rod and 
Gun Club 4, 3, 2; Dormitory Sodality 4. 



JAMES T. REAGAN 

20 Oakley Road, Belmont, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Sodality 4, 3, 2; A.M.E. 4, 3; Com- 
mencement Committee 3; Track 1 ; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3. 



RICHARD T. REALE 

10 Carlotta Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — A.M.E. 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Prom Committee 3. 



THOMAS J. REARDON 

162 Gray Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Journal of Business 4; 
Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 






HECTOR REICHARD 

Box 96, Aguadilla, Puerto Rico 

B.S. Distribution Management — Executive Seminar 3; Spanish Acad 
emy 4, 3 (President 4); A.M.E. 4 (Secretary); Marketing Club 3 
Beta Gamma Sigma 4, 3; Alpha Sigma Nu 4, 3; Phi Eta Mu 4, 3, 2 
Dinner Dance 2; Jr. Week Prom Committee; Italian Academy 4 
Dean's List. 



RICHARD A. REILLY 

12 Peck Street, Attleboro, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — A.M.E. 4, 3; Bl. Oliver Plunkett 
Society 3; Ski Team 4; Journal of Business 4, 3. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



ROBERT F. RITCHIE 

17 McDonough Way, South Boston, Massachusetts 

B.S. Economics — Dinner Dance Committee 4; W.R.L. 4; Economics 
Academy 4, 3; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 3. 



THOMAS D. ROBINSON 

72 Robbins Road, Watertown, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Drill Team 3; Market- 
ing Club 1; Commencement Committee 3; Intramurals 1. 




It 



329 



WILLIAM H. ROBINSON, JR. 

11 Englewood Avenue, Brookline, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Football 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Baseball 4, 3, 
Marketing Club 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



'•fas* 



FRANK V. ROBOTTI 

40 Rippowam Road, Stamford, Connecticut 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4; Football 4, 3, 2, I; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 






GLENN C. ROGERS 

25 Bigelow Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 
B.S. Economies — Economics Academy 4, 3, 2; Dean's List. 



*Ak 



JAMES F. RUSSELL 

577 Main Street, Wareham, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Alpha Sigma Nu 4 (President); Beta Gamma 
Sigma 4, 3; Journal of Business 4, 3 (Executive Editor 4); Cadet 
Officers Club 4, 3 (Treasurer 4); Accounting Academy 3, 2; Jr. 
Week Committee (Treasurer); Intramurals 1; Honors Program 4, 
3, 2; Dean's List. 




PETER J. ROMANO 

35 Pemberton Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Alpha Sigma Nu 4; Accounting Academy 4, 3; 
Beta Gamma Sigma 4, 3 (President 4); Dean's List. 





ARTHUR D. RYAN 

10 Anawan Terrace, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Rifle Club 1; Marketing Club 4, 3; 
Stylus 4. 




COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 





FREDERICK S. RYAN, JR. 

136 Russell Road, Framingham, Massachusetts 
B.S. Distribution Management 



JOHN F. RYAN 

18 Telegraph Street, South Boston, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3; Track Team 4, 3, 2, 1; 
counting Academy 4, 3, 2 (Secretary). 





JOHN C. SEREMET 

323 Cedarwood Lane, Newington, Connecticut 

B.S. Finance— Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Connecticut Club 4, 1; Finance 
Club 4, 3; Young Republicans Club 4. 



WILLIAM J. SHARKEY, JR. 

6 Sylvester Road, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

B.S. Industrial Management — Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Band 3, 2, 1; 
S.A.M. 4, 3 (President 4); Under-Graduate Library Committee 
4, 3; Class President 1; Dean's List. 





A kit 



HANS D. SCHNOOR 

Brown's Town P. O., Jamaica, B. W. I. 

B.S. General Business — Chess Club 2, 1; Gun Club 4, 2; German 
Club 4, 2. 




HERBERT D. SCHOFIELD 

98 Lincoln Street, Needham, Massachusetts 
B.S. Finance — Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Finance Club 4, 3; Dean's List. 





it* 



JOHN F. SHEA 

73 Seymour Street, Roslindale, Massachusetts 
B.S. Accounting 



JOHN E. SHEEHAN 

1333 Jennings Road, Fairfield, Connecticut 

B.S. General Business — Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; S.A.M. 3; Cross 
Country 1; Toastmasters' Circle 3. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



JOSEPH P. SLAMIN 

11 Parkway Road, Medford, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Heights 4, 3; Jr. Week Pops Com- 
mittee 3; A.M.E. 4, 3; Ski Team 4. 



WILLIAM F. SLATTERY 

211 Wood Avenue, Hyde Park, Massachusetts 
B.S. Finance — Toastmasters' Circle 3, 2, 1; Finance Club 2, 1. 




life 




ROBERT J. SOUCY 

41 Cole Street, Beverly, Massachusetts 
B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3. 



J. PORTER STARR ATT 

38 St. Paul Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 

B.S. Industrial Management — Dance Committee 4; Jr. Show 3; 
S.A.M. 4, 3; 






PHILIP M. ST. GERMAIN 

34 Pine Hill Road, Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Section Rep. 2, 1 ; Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Delta 
Sigma Pi 4, 3, 2 (Treasurer 4); Accounting Academy 4, 3 (Treas- 
urer 4); Graduation Committee 3; Beta Gamma Sigma 4; Dean's 
List. 



JOHN B. ST. PAUL 

605 Main Street, Medford, Massachusetts 
B.S. Accounting — Italian Academy 4, 3; Accounting Academy 4, 3. 



BRENDAN E. SULLIVAN 

41 Martland Avenue, Brockton, Massachusetts 
B.S. Accounting 



■-■-mm 



DAVID M. SULLIVAN 

1 1 Avon Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; Accounting Academy 4, 3; 
W.R.L. 4, 3; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4. 





COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 





FREDERICK G. SULLIVAN 

44 Mather Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Sub Turri 4; Toastmasters' Circle 
4, 3, 2 (President 4); Business Club 2 (President); Section Rep. 2; 
Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3; A.M.E. 4, 3; Economics Academy 3, 2; 
Orientation 3; Dean's List. 



JAMES T. SULLIVAN 

148 Weston Road, Wellesley, Massachusetts 
B.S. Accounting — Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3, 2, 1 (Sergeant- 



at-Arms 4); Accounting Academy 4, 3. 




J. JEFFREY SULLIVAN 

1 1 1 Standish Road, Milton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Football 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Delta Sigma Pi 
Fraternity 4, 3 (Historian); Jr. Week Barn Dance Committee 3 
(Co-Chairman); lntramurals 3, 2, 1. 



RICHARD J. SULLIVAN 

17 Pequossette Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 

B.S. Economics — W.R.L. 4; Foreign Trade Club 4; Economics 
Academy 4; Italian Academy 4; Prom Committee 4. 



ROBERT W. SULLIVAN, JR. 

95 Hayward Street, Braintree, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance — Football Manager 4, 3, 2; Finance Club 4, 3; Sub 
Turri 4; lntramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 





WALTER T. SULLIVAN 

144 Nesmith Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

B.S. General Business— Ski Team 4, 3, 1 ; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1 ; W.V.B.C. 
4, 3. 






ROGER S. SWEENEY 

48 Pleasant View Road, Arlington, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance — Sub Turri 4; Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3; Hockey 4, 3, 2, 1 
(Manager); Finance Club 4, 3; Jr. Week Committee; Prom Com- 
mittee 2; lntramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; Varsity Club 4. 




JOHN R. TENNEY 

18 Columbia Street, Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Chess Club 1; Accounting Academy 4, 3, 2; Mar- 
keting Club 4; lntramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



EDGAR A. THEROUX 

106 Robinson Street, Woonsocket, Rhode Island 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Rhode Island Club 4, 3; 
French Academy 2, 1. 



ROBERT V. TIERNAN 

7 Cheever Street, Revere, Massachusetts 

B.S. Economics — Omicron Chi Epsilon 4, 3; Economics Academy 
4; Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Orientation 3; Beta Gamma Sigma 4; 
Dean's List. 






333 



JAMES J. TIRRELL 

10 Child Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance — Business Club 2, 1; Finance Club 4, 3; Toastmasters' 
Circle 4, 3; Intramurals 3, 2. 




%-SF ^ 



RICHARD N. TOBIA 

36 East Broadway, Gardner, Massachusetts 
B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 3; Intramurals 2, 1; Rod 
and Gun Club 4; Beta Gamma Sigma 4; Dean's List. 



m MM 









JAMES M. TOBIN 

21 Houghton Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 
B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Bellarmine Law and 
Govt. Academy 4, 3; Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3; Intramurals 
4, 3, 2. 




NORMAN E. TOWLE 

145 Pine Ridge Road, Medford, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Sub Turri 4; Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3; 
Sailing Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Gold Key 2; Intramurals 3, 2, 1; Marketing 
Club 3, 2; Dean's List. 



COSMO S. TRAPANI 

93 Flint Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 
IS. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Business Club 2. 



WARREN F. TREANOR 

39 Orlando Avenue, Winthrop, Massachusetts 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3 (Vice-President 4); Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1; Football 1. 




COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



334 



M A 




JOSEPH F. TRIANO 

666 Cooper Avenue, Oradell, New Jersey 
B.S. Finance — New York Club 2, 1; Finance Club 3; Jr. Show 3. 



PAUL F. VALZANIA 

370 Fenno Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 
B.S. Finance— Gold Key 4, 3, 2; Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3; Finance Club 
4, 3 (President 4. Secretary 3); Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 





' 4fPgg|hr Jjfffii"* 



ROBERT H. WEBSTER 

46 Woodgate Street, Mattapan, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Cadet Officers Club 4, 3 (Secretary 4); Section 
Rep. 4, 3; Accounting Academy 4, 2; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; Stu- 
dent Sponsor 4; Prom Committee 3, 2, 1. 



Mtm 



THOMAS A. WELCH 

264 Lexington Street, Woburn, Massachusetts 
B.S. Economics — Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Beta Gamma Sigma 4, 3 
(Vice-President 4); Alpha Sigma Nu 4, 3; Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3, 2 
(Vice-President 3); Toastmasters' Circle 4, 3, 2 (Vice-President 3); 
Dean's List. 



WARREN P. WELSH 

32 Pondview Road, Arlington, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Accounting Academy 2; Market- 
ing Club 3; A.M.E. 4; Dean's List. 



CHARLES H. WHITE, JR. 

521 Pleasant Street, Milton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Economics — Beta Gamma Sigma 4, 3 (Secretary-Treasurer 4); 
Omicron Chi Epsilon 4, 3 (Vice-President 4); Journal of Business 
3, 2; Honors Program 4, 3, 2; Economics Academy 4; Dean's List. 







ROBERT L. WHITE 

40 Wampatuck, Scituate, Massachusetts 

B.S. Distribution Management — Bl. Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3, 
2, 1; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 




ARTHUR B. WILLIAMS 

49 Orchard Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 
B.S. Accounting 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



ROBERT S. WILSON 

36 College Avenue, Somerville, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — C.B.A. Debating Team 2; Intramurals 3, 2, 1; 
Accounting Academy 4, 3, 2; Section Rep. 2; Dean's List. 



JOHN P. ZAZZARO 

241 Grandview Terrace, Hartford, Connecticut 

B.S. Finance — Connecticut Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Finance Club 4, 
C.B.A. Debating Society 2. 




JOHN F. ZIRKEL 

10 Emerson Road, Winchester, Massachusetts 

B.S. Finance— Hockey 4, 3, 2, 1; Finance Club 4, 3; Gold Key 1; 
Cadet Officers Club 4; Ricci Math Club 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



PETER R. ZOBEL 

136 78th Street, Brooklyn, New York 

B.S. Finance — New York Club 4, 1; Italian Academy 4, 3; Spanish 
Club 4; Finance Club 4. 





JAMES E. ZYNTELL 

15 Bellflower Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

B.S. Industrial Management — Sub Turri 4; Basketball 4, 3, 2, 1 
(Manager); S.A.M. 4, 3; Gold Key Society 2, 1 ; Psychology Club 4; 
Intramurals 3. 




COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



fN*- 



336 






Senior Class Officers — Nancy Magri, Vice President; 
Madeline Druzdis, President. 



Senior Class Officers — Lois Lane, Secretary; Janet 
Gibbons, Treasurer. 




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SCHOOL 

OF 
NURSING 



337 




RITA L. AILINGER 

114 Wrentham Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 2, 1; Social Activities Com- 
mittee 4; Dean's List. 



JANE L. ANDERSON 

449 Waltham Street, West Newton, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1 ; Sodality 2, 1 . 



JUDITH BARDEN 

28 Washington Avenue, Waltham, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 2, 1; Basketball 2, 1; Com- 
mencement Committee 3 Siena Society 4, 3 (Chairman 4); Class 
Officer 1 (President); Class Council 1 (Secretary); Student Senate 1; 
Dean's List. 



PATRICIA A. BEDARD 

132 Marsden Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 2, 1; Class Officer 1 (Vice- 
President); Class Council 1; Student Senate 1; Siena Society 4; 
Honor Board 4 (Chairman); Dean's List. 







CAROL M. BOLDUC 

24 Paradox Drive, Worcester, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing— Sodality 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Honor Board 2. 



MARY ANN F. BOWES 

78 Pine Grove Avenue, Newton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 2, 1; Handbook Commit- 
tee; Dean's List. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



338 





/ 



LYNDA T. BOYLE 

103 Hollis Avenue, Braintree, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 2, 1; Public Relations Com- 
mittee 1 (Chairman). 



ELLEN A. BRENNAN 

76 Derby Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1 ; Sodality 2, 1 ; Prom Committee 2; 
Dean's List. 



MAUREEN C. BUCHANAN 

31 Fletcher Street, Roslindale 31, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing— Sodality 2, 1 ; Glee Club 2, 1 ; Dean's List. 




NOREEN M. BUCKLEY 

8 Barton Street, West Hartford, Connecticut 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1 ; Sodality 4 3,2, I ; Siena Society 4; 
Social Service Committee 1; Social Activities Committee 2; Prom 
Committee 1; Student Faculty Organization 4, 3 (Vice-President 3, 
President 4); Dean's List. 




ANN P. CAPRIO 

112 Burnside Street, Cranston, Rhode Island 

B.S. Nursing— Sodality 2, 1 ; Glee Club 2, 1 ; Rhode Island Club 4, 2; 
Social Service Committee 2; Commencement Committee 3; Cap- 
ping Committee 1 ; Dean's List. 



PHYLLIS A. CHAMPIGNY 

83 Myrtle Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 
B.S Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 2, 1; Prom Committee 3. 



RUTH E. COLAVECCHIO 

4 Orchard Circle, Westwood, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Dinner Dance 
Committee 2; Jr. Week Committee; Class Officer 2 (Treasurer); 
Class Council 2; Student Senate 2. 





LORETTA M. CONDE 

36 Highland Street, Peabody, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1 ^-Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Victory Dance 4 
(Co-Chairman). 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 





ELIZABETH M. DAVITT 

221 Atwater Road, Springfield, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Class Officer 2 
(Secretary); Class Officer 1 (Treasurer); Class Council 2, 1; Student 
Senate 2, 1 . 



MADELINE A. DRUZDIS 

502 E. 4th Street, South Boston, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Dinner Dance 2 
(Co-Chairman); Class Officer 4 (President). 



339 




ANNE H. DUGAN 

78 Cedarcliff Road, E. Braintree, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 4, 3, 2, I (Prefect); Dean's 
List. 



MARCIA FENLON 

90 So. Williams Street, Haverhill, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing — Glee Club 2, ]; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Commencement 
Committee 3; Siena Society; Class Officer 1 (Secretary); Class 
Council I ; Student Senate 1 ; Student Faculty Organization 3, 2 
(Treasurer 3, Corresponding Secretary 2); Dean's List. 



MARGARET J. FRANCO 

2532 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 
IS. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 2, 1; Basketball 2, 1. 





JANET M. GIBBONS 

69 Neptune Street, Beverly, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 2, 1; Basketball 2, 1; Class 
Officer 4 (Secretary). 




LOUISE E. GILMAN 

356 Cummins Highway, Roslindale, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1 ; Sodality 2, 1 ; Rhode Island Club 4, 3; 
Student Faculty Organization 2, 1 (Recording Secretary 2, Cor- 
responding Secretary 1); Dean's List. 



CLAUDETTE M. GOULET 

118 Mt. Vernon Avenue, Somerset, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1 ; Sodality 2, 1 . 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 




340 




ELAINE M. GUERRA 

126 Belmont Street, Wollaston, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Sodality 2, 1; Glee Club 2, I; Public Relations Com- 
mittee 1 ; Dean's List. 



CAROLE A. HAIN 

236 Corey Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 2, 1. 



MARY J. HAJJAR 

Mt. Pleasant Street, North Billerica, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing — Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1 (Treasurer); Com- 
mencement Committee 3. 



PATRICIA A. HARRIGAN 

1253 Massachusetts Avenue, Arlington, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, I; Sodality 2, 1; Class Officer 3 (Vice- 
President); Ways and Means Committee 4, 2 (Chairman 4); Class 
Council 3; Student Senate 3; Dean's List. 






ELEANORA M. HAYES 

1 1 Northgate Park, West Newton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 2, 1 ; Glee Club 2. I ; Commencement Com- 
mittee 3. 



ANNE M. HUNT 

15 Shade Street, Lexington, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 2, 1; Library Committee 2; 
Siena Society 4, 3; Dean's List. 



MARYANN L. JOHNSTON 

Box 116, Rye Center, New Hampshire 
B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, I; Sodality 2, 1. 



MARY M. KENNEDY 

Lake Attitash, Amesbury, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3,2, 1 ; Nominating Committee 4, 
(Chairman 4); Commencement Committee 3. 





BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 





LOIS M. LANE 

51 Marston Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Basketball 2, 1; 
Ways and Means Committee 3; Class Officer 4 (Treasurer); Class 
Council 4. 



CLAIRE L. LAWTON 

12 Highland Street, West Concord, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Sodality 4, 3,2, 1 ; Glee Club 2, 1 ; Library Com- 
mittee 1; Campus Council 2; Student Senate 2; Class Officer 2 
(President). 



341 




NANCY M. MAGRI 

207 Metropolitan Avenue, Roslindale, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing — Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Legislative Board 
3; Class Officer 4 (Vice-President); Class Council 4; Student Senate 
4; Dean's List. 



ANNE E. MANNING 

36 Greenwood Avenue, Hyde Park, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Class Officer 2 
(Vice-President); Class Council 2; Student Senate 2; Dean's List. 



ANN C. McGRATH 

16 Tappan Street, Melrose, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 2, 1; Dean's List. 



ANN E. McHALE 

30 Crest Avenue, Melrose, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing — Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Commencement 
Committee 3; Dean's List. 







CATHERINE L. MOLLOY 

27 Brackett Street, Milton, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 2, 1; Honor Board 3. 



CHRISTINE M. MURPHY 

85 Bartlett Avenue, Belmont, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing — Glee Club 1 ; Sodality 1 ; Social Activities Com- 
mittee 3. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



342 








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1 


y 


e0> 







MAUREEN A. NAGLE 

80 Westover Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing — Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Commencement 
Committee 3. 



BARBARA A. O'KEEFE 

34 Brown Avenue, Hempstead, New York 

B.S. Nursing—SodaYity 4, 3, 2, I; Glee Club 2, 1; Commencement 
Committee 3; Social Activities Committee 4, 1 (Chairman 4); 
Legislative Board 3. 



MAUREEN A. O'NEILL 

27 Colonial Drive, Arlington, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2. 1 ; Sodality 2, 1 . 



ELENA A. PELUSI 

94A Fulton Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1 ; Sodality 2, 1 ; Honor Board 1 ; Class 
Officer 3 (President); Class Council 3; Student Senate 3; Dean's List. 





JOAN M. PICKETT 

72 Gardner Street, Allston, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1 ; Sodality 2, 1 ; Basketball 2, 1 ; Dean's 
List. 



JOYCE M. POLANSKI 

9 Furnace Street, Danielson, Connecticut 

B.S. Nursing — Glee Club 2, 1 ; Sodality 2, 1 ; Commencement Com- 
mittee 3; Social Service Committee 4, 3 (Chairman 4). 



BARBARA A. POWER 

820 East 5th Street, South Boston, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Sub Turri 4 
(Associate Editor); Library Committee 4; Commencement Com- 
mittee 3; Class Historian 4, 3; Siena Society 4, 3; Dean's List. 



HENRIETTA M. SEMRAD 

86 Upland Road, Waban, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing— SodaUty 4, 3, 2, 1 . 






BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 




KATHLEEN M. SULLIVAN 

14 Intervale Road, Wellesley, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 2, 1; Siena Society 4; Com- 
mencement Committee 3; Sub Turri 4; Dean's List. 



MARY F. SULLIVAN 

51 Reservoir Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Basketball 2, 1. 



343 




MIRIAM A. SWEENEY 

27 St. James Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 2, 1; Public Relations Com- 
mittee 3; Commencement Committee 3; Dean's List. 



ANN M. WASILAUSKAS 

20 Greycliff Road, Brighton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 2, 1; Basketball 2, 1; 
Commencement Committee 3 (Co-Chairman); Class Officer 3 
(Treasurer); Class Council 3; Student Senate 3. 



ELLEN M. WEDGEWORTH 

258 Gallivan Boulevard, Dorchester 24, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Dramatic Society 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 2, 1; 
Library Committee 4, 3 (Chairman 4); Commencement Commit- 
tee 3; Jr. Week Committee 3. 



ROSEMARY WELCH 

36 Lincoln Road, Brockton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 2, 1; Basketball 3, 2; Com- 
mencement Committee 3; Dance Committee 3; Dean's List. 






SARA E. WELCH 

644 Weld Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Glee Club 2, 1; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Jr. Week Com- 
mittee; Class Officer 3 (Secretary); Class Council 3; Student Senate 
3; Dean's List. 



; 



PATRICIA JOHNSON 

35 Vernon Street, Rockland, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing — Capping Committee 2; Dance Committee 2. 



GRADUATE NURSING 





EVENING COLLEGE 




Senior Class Officers — Lauretta Sweeney, Secretary; Mary Baker, Treasurer; Robert Byrne, Vice 
President; Eugene McLaughlin, President. 



345 



MARY FAITH BAKER 

62 Liberty Avenue, Somerville, Massachusetts 

A.B. English— Sodality 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 (Prefect 5, Secretary 4, Sec- 
retary 3, Treasurer 6); Minstrel Show 6, 5, 4; B.C. Eye 4; Student 
Council 6 (Secretary). 



THOMAS M. BARRON 

18 Hall Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 
B.S. General Business 









JOSEPH P. BERGIN, JR. 

22 Highland Road, Somerville, Massachusetts 

B.S. Management — Student Council 4, 3, 2, 1 (President 4, 3, Treas- 
urer 2); Towers 4, 3, 2 (Editor-in-Chief 2); Ballarmine Speakers' 
Club 5; Dean's List. 




. jBmk 



WILLIAM J. BROWNRIGG 

9 Newton Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 
A.B. Social Science 



ALLAN J. BUSTA 

1 Arthur Street, Methuen, Massachusetts 
B.S. Marketing 



ROBERT J. BYRNE 

45 Oriole Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

B.S. Accounting — Minstrel Show 6, 5, 4; Ski Weekend Chairman 
5, 4; Halloween Dance Chairman 2; Outing Committee Chairman 4; 
Sodality 5, 4, 3, 2, 1; Speaker's Club 4, 3; Towers 6; Class Officer 
(Vice-President 6, Vice-President 5, Vice-President 4, Vice-Presi- 
dent 3, Treasurer 2); Student Council 4 (Vice-President); Student 
Council 6 (Treasurer). 




V J 




EVENING COLLEGE 



346 








THOMAS A. CALLAHAN 

34 Eustis Street, Wollaston, Massachusetts 
A.B. Social Science — Dean's List. 



EDWIN F. COLLINS 

19 Little Tree Lane, Framingham, Massachusetts 
B.S. General Business 




LEO F. CONNOLLY 

54 Garfield Avenue, Hyde Park, Massachusetts 
B.S. Accounting — Halloween Dance Committee; Dean's List. 



JAMES J. COSTELLO 

41 Massachusetts Avenue, Quincy, Massachusetts 
B.S. General Business — Dean's List. 



NEIL F. DOHERTY 

114 Elmer Road, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
B.S. General Business 



SHIRLEY A. DUGGAN 

77 Everett Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 

A.B. English— Sodality 5; Class Officer (President 4, Secretary 5); 
Undergraduate Library Committee. 





ittfc 








JOHN J. ENGLISH 

278 South Street, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 
B.S. Accounting — Student Council. 




WILLIAM E. FARRELL 

390 Mt. Auburn Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 

A.B. History and Government — Class Officer 2, 1 (President); Min- 
strel Show; Dean's List. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



DELIA P. FEENEY 

1163 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts 
A.B. English 



CLEMENT B. FENTON 

337 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 
A.B. English 




347 



EDMUND P. FERULLO, JR. 

15 Buena Vista Park, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

A.B. Economics — Bellarmine Speakers' Circle 1; Sodality 2, 1; In- 
tramurals 1. 



JOSEPH T. FITZGERALD 

44 Barrett Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics 






k 





EILEEN C. GALVIN 

124 Josephine Avenue, W. Somerville, Massachusetts 
B.S. Education 



FRANCES GEOGHEGAN 

94 Gainsboro Street, Boston, Massachusetts 
A.B. History and Government — Minstrel Show 6, 5; Orphan's 
Party Committee 6, 5; Ski Weekend Committee 5; Towers 6; Sub 
Turri 6; Dean's List. 



RICHARD E. GORTON 

3 Russell Road, Winchester, Massachusetts 
B.S. General Business 



MARY V. HANLEY 

77 Maple Street, Melrose, Massachusetts 
A.B. English — Minstrel Show 5, 4; Sodality 5; Towers 6, 5. 





EVENING COLLEGE 



■m 







348 




NANCY E. HEBERT 

8 Vinal Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 

B.S: Education— Sodality 3, 2, 1 ; Student Council 6, 5, 4 (Secretary 
5); Towers 6, 5, 4; Minstrel Show 6; Dean's Rep. 6; Dean's List. 



CHARLES W. HOPKINS 

102 Piermont Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 
B.S. Accounting — Dean's List. 




PAUL F. HYNES 

43 Nonantum Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 
B.S. General Business 



MARIE H. LETTS 

35 Great Road, E. Acton, Massachusetts 
A.B. English — Dean's List. 



ROBERT W. LUBOLD 

55 Woodruff Road, Walpole, Massachusetts 

B.S. General Business — Sub Turri 6; Student Council 5, 4 (President 
5, Vice-President 4). 



MARY P. MacMINN 

710 Walnut Street, Newton Centre, Massachusetts 
B.S. Education — Mater Christi 2, 1 (Treasurer); Dean's List. 







JOHN L. MANNING 

290 Vermont Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 
B.S. General Business 



■ A 



THOMAS P. MANNING 

38 Linden Street, Allston, Massachusetts 
A.B. Social Science — Dean's List. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



JOSEPH R. MARSOLINI 

10 Woodhill Road, Burlington, Massachusetts 
B.S. General Business — Class Officer 1 (Treasurer); Dean's List. 



CATHERINE V. McCANN 

24 Centre Avenue, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

A.B. Social Science— Minstrel Show 5; French Club 1; W.R.A. 1; 
Dean's List. 




FRANCIS J. McCLORY 

81 South Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 
A.B. Social Science 



mary t. Mcdonough 

604 Western Avenue, Lynn, Massachusetts 
A.B. English — Dean's List. 






JAMES McINTYRE 

35 Marlboro Street, Boston, Massachusetts 
B.S. General Business 



eugene j. Mclaughlin 

59 Waverly Street, Roxbury, Massachusetts 
B.S. Accounting—Student Council 6 (President); Sodality 5; Bellar- 
mine Speakers' Club 5; Minstrel Show 5, 4; Class Officer 6 (Presi- 
dent); Dean's List. 



GERALDLNE E. MOCOGNI 

35 Pacific Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 
A.B. Social Science — Dean's List. 



GEORGE W. O'KEEFFE 

189 Williams Avenue, Milton, Massachusetts 
B.S. Distribution Management — Dean's List. 






EVENING COLLEGE 



350 





RICHARD C. O'NEEL 

46 Walter Street, Salem, Massachusetts 
B.S. General Business — Dean's List. 



WILLIAM E. ORR, JR. 

80 Hillside Street, Roxbury, Massachusetts 
B.S. Accounting 




JOHN R. PAPINEAU 

60 Mt. Vernon Avenue, Needham, Massachusetts 
B.S. Distribution Management — Dean's List. 



ZOFJA PODOSKA 

57 W. Cedar Street, Boston, Massachusetts 
A.B. Social Science — Dean's List. 



RICHARD J. SHEA 

3 Upland Road, Quincy, Massachusetts 



A.B. English 




WILLIAM L. SMITH 

52 Herrick Road, Newton Centre, Massachusetts 
A.B. Economics 








CLAIRE M. SOULNIER 

55 Garnet Road, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 
A.B. History 





EDWARD J. STANTON 

31 Paul Gore Street, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 



A.B. Social Sciences 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



LAURETTA L. SWEENEY 

67 Charlemont Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

B.S. Education— Sodality 5, 4, 3, 2, 1; Minstrel Show 6, 5, 4; Ski 
Weekend Committee 6, 5, 4, 3, 2; B. C. Eye 4; Towers 6, 5; Retreat 
Committee 6, 5; Outing Committee 6, 5, 4, 3, 2; Halloween Dance 
Committee 6; Dance Chairman: Thanksgiving 5, Pre-Lenten 5; St. 
Patricks Day 5; Class Officer (Secretary 4, Treasurer 5, Secretary 6); 
Student Council 6 (Vice-President). 

THOMAS J. WHALEN 

129 Bunker Hill Street, Charlestown, Massachusetts 
B.S. Accounting 




351 




DOLORES ALESSANDRTN1 

117 South Washington Street, Binghamton, New York 
B.S. Nursing 



CAMILLA ASHLEY 

37 Someset Street, Massena, New York 



B.S. Nursing 



MARY JANE BARRY 

99 Wellington Avenue, Newport, Rhode Island 
B.S. Nursing — English Academy 4. 



ALICE L. BELANGER 

48 South Street, Worcester 4, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing — Campus Council 4. 







BARBARA A. BENNETTI 

921 West 22nd Street, Erie, Pennsylvania 



B.S. Nursing 



JUDITH R. BIRMINGHAM 

1 1 Wendell Place, Stamford, Connecticut 

B.S. Nursing— Class Officer 2, 1 (Secretary-Treasurer 2, 1); Student- 
Faculty Organization 4, 3; English Academy 4. 



GRADUATE NURSING 





MARYANNE BLACK 

77 Folsom Avenue, East Bridgewater, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing — Nominating Committee 3; English Academy 4, 3; 
Sodality 3. 



SISTER MARY CONSOLATA BOYCE, F.M.S.I. 

Vista Maria, Cragsmoor, New York 
B.S. Nursing 



MARY URSULA BRADY 

283 East 234th Street, Bronx, New York 

B.S. Nursing — English Academy 4, 3; Sodality 4, 3; Student-Faculty 
4, 3; Honor Board 4, 3 (Chairman 4). 



M. BEVERLY BRIGGS 

B.S. Nursing — 236 Locust Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 





JOAN BROGGI 

2633 Lake Drive, Riviera Beach, Florida 
B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4. 



SARAH J. BUCKLEY 

296 South Street, Bridgewater, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing — Class Officer 4 (Vice-President); Nominating Com- 
mittee 3; Ways and Means Committee 4. 



JUDITH R. CHABOT 

115 Sayles Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing — English Academy 4, 3. 



D. JANE COFFEY 

154 Long Hill, Springfield, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing — Social Activities Committee 3; English Academy 4; 
Sodality 4. 



<* a:['z^ 




BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 










LSmm 




w&W ''* 


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T T" 


I 



MARY K. CORD1NGLEY 

4 Glenmere Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing — Nominating Committee 3; Bl. Oliver Plunkett So- 
ciety 3. 



GLENDA COTTER 

Jubilee Street, New Britain, Connecticut 
B.S. Nursing—SodaYity 4. 



353 



■ 


A 


Hr 


WW /*' 




^S 




1 






JULIA DALEY 

2 Cheever Street, Chelsea, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing — Student Council 4, 3; Section Rep. 3; Nominating 
Committee 4. 



ELEANOR L. DAVIO 

880 Main Street, Agawam, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing— Sodality 4, 3. 



SISTER M. JOSEPH FRANCIS DESMOND 

Medical Missionaries of Mary 
1 Arlington Street, Winchester, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing 



MARY E. DEVANEY 

20 Boynton Street, Clinton, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing — Library Committee 4; Class Officer 3 (President). 







JANET A. DOURNEY 

109 Grove Place, Utica, New York 



B.S. Nursing 



MARY F. DUTKA 

R.F.D. No. 3, Norwich, Connecticut 



B.S. Nursing 



GRADUATE NURSING 




354 




CELINE A. FINN 

30 Ingram Street, Hamden, Connecticut 



B.S. Nursing 



MARY P. FINNERTY 

31 Fenwood Road, Boston, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing — Social Committee 4; Section Rep. 4. 



HELEN F. FITZPATRICK 

1450 High Street, Westwood, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing — Class Officer 3 (Vice-President); Student Council 4, 
3; Ways and Means Committee 4, 3. 



ELEANOR FOSSATI 

159 Beechwood Avenue, Torrington, Connecticut 
B.S. Nursing 





JUDITH A. GRANT 

200 B Walnut Street, Newtonville, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing — Glee Club 3; Social Activities Committee 4; Ways 
and Means Committee 3; Student- Faculty Organization. 



JUNE MARIE HARRINGTON 

133 Mercer Street, East Providence, Rhode Island 
B.S. Nursing 



ELIZABETH A. HAYDEN 

65 Preston Street, Everett, Massachusetts 



B.S. Nursing 



EVELYN P. HAYES 

10 Trapelo Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing 





BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 




SALLIE A. JOHNSON 

102 Randall Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing 



EILEEN P. KINSELLA 

710 Amsterdam Avenue. New York, New York 
B.S. Nursing 



355 




JOYCE KONOPKA 

6 South Whittesey Avenue, Wallingford, Connecticut 
B.S. Nursing 



KATHLEEN LAWTON 

25 Pine Street, Whitinsville, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing — Social Service Committee 4 (Chairman); Library 
Committee 4. 



ELLEN LEWIS 

369 Maple Hill Avenue, Newington, Connecticut 
B.S. Nursing — English Academy 4. 



CAROL A. LORD 

42 Langley Road, Brighton, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing 







ANN M. LYNCH 

127 Washington Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing 



ARLENE L. LYNCH 

1669 Commonwealth Avenue, Brighton, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing 



GRADUATE NURSING 



356 




M. MARCIA LYNCH 

108 East Ellis Street, East Syracuse, New York 
B.S. Nursing — Student Council 4. 



LUCETTA M. MacDONALD 

291 Beacon Street, Boston, Massachusetts 



B.S. Nursing 



EUNICE A. MAIETTA 

408 Main Street, Winchester, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing 



MARY D. MALONE 

Warren Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 



B.S. Nursing 







ANN M. MAUGHN 

51 Nixon Street, Dorchester 24, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing — Student-Faculty Organization 4; Sodality 3. 



PAULINE D. McBRINE 

149 Common Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing 



mary b. Mcdonald 

61 Alvord Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing 



SHIRLEY McGEE 

34 Read Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing — Sub Turri 4 (Associate Editor). 





BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 



«W -'«V 




MARIE F. MONAST 

40 Cleveland Avenue, Worcester, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing — Student-Faculty Organization 4, 3 (Secretary 4, 
Treasurer 3); English Academy 4, 3; Sodality 4, 3. 



ELIZABETH D. MOODY 

95 Prospect Street, Stafford Springs, Connecticut 
B.S. Nursing — Student-Faculty Organization 4. 



357 




MARGARET M. MULRY 

414 East 240th Street, New York. New York 
B.S. Nursing 



JANE F. MURPHY 

102 "I" Street, South Boston. Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing — English Academy; Student-Faculty Organization. 



MAUREEN J. O'BRIEN 

9 Mountain Avenue, Somerville 43, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing — English Academy 4, 3; Sodality 4, 3; Social Service 
Committee 3; Nominating Committee 3. 



NATALIE M. OMILNOWICZ 

34 Whitcomb Street, Webster, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing — English Academy 3, 4; Sodality 3. 4. 







ANN T. PEPPARD 

193 Parmenter Road. West Newton, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing 



CAROL A. PHILPOTT 

41 Coolidge Road, Allston, Massachusetts 



B.S. Nursing 



GRADUATE NURSING 





EBLEEN C. PRESTON 

20 Warren Terrace, West Hartford, Connecticut 
B.S. Nursing 



PATRICIA REGAN 

8 Sumner Park, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing 



HELEN RIEGER 

316 Hillcrest Avenue, Wood-Ridge, New Jersey 
B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4; English Academy 4. 




THERESA ANN RIORDAN 

21 Orchard Street, Lowell. Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing — Sub Turri 4 (Associate Editor). 




SR. MONICA ROCK, R.H.S.J. 

12 Arlington Street, Boston, Massachusetts 



B.S. Nursing 



EILEEN M. RYAN 

245 Itasca Street, Mattapan 26, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing — Legislation Board 4, 3; Social Service Committee 3; 
Sodality 4. 3; Honor Board 4; English Academy 4. 



MARY T. RYAN 

53 Bell Road, North Brookfield, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3; English Academy 3; Legislation Board 
3; Public Relations Committee 4; Section Rep. 4. 




PATRICIA A. SHEA 

59 Pennsylvania Avenue, Somerville, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 




w 



I 




ANNE M. SHERIDAN 

18 Rose Garden Circle, Brighton, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing — Student-Faculty Organization 4, 3 (President 4; Vice- 
President 3). 



ELIZABETH SINGLETARY 

162 Courtland Street, Providence, Rhode Island 
B.S. Nursing 



359 




BARBARA D. SKURET 

96 Franklin Street. Ansonia, Connecticut 



B.S. Nursing 



JOAN C. SULLIVAN 

633 A Adams Street, Milton 86, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing — Student-Faculty Organization 3; Section Rep. 3. 



JOAN F. SWANSON 

490 Medford Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing 



HELEN TAMASAUSKAS 

556 Roger Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 




B.S. Nursing 







ANTHONY TOMMASIELLO 

456 Union Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island 
B.S. Nursing 



MARY F. TRAVERS 

27 Irving Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 



B.S. Nursing 



GRADUATE NURSING 



360 





CAROL A. TRIBLETS 

352 Main Street, South Glastonbury, Connecticut 

B.S. Nursing — Ways and Means Committee 3; Social Activities 
Committee 4 (Chairman). 



JOANNA FRANCES WASIK 

130 Blake Road, New Britain, Connecticut 



B.S. Nursing 



BEVERLY J. WEST 

403 Concord Street, Framington, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing 



CATHERINE KNECHT WHEELER 

652 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 
B.S. Nursing — Student-Faculty Organization 4. 






w 




BERNADINE WHELAN 

29 Addington Road, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

B.S. Nursing— Class Officer 3 (President); Student Council 3; So- 
dality 4, 3; English Academy 4, 3. 



ELLEN M. ZMIJESKI 

244 Pleasant Street, New Britain, Connecticut 
B.S. Nursing — Sodality 3; Social Committee 4. 




BOSTON COLLEGE • CLASS OF 1961 




SENIOR WEEK '61 

JUNE 4-12, 1961 



Sunday, June 4: Communion Breakfast 

Guest Speaker: 

Msgr. FRANCIS LALLY 

Editor of "The Pilot" 
Mass: Bapst Auditorium — 9:00 A. M. 
Breakfast: Lyons Hall 

Tuesday, June 6: Swizzles at Steuben's 

A Night at Steuben's Famous Vienna Room 
Two Orchestras — Dancing, Dinner Optional 

Thursday, June 8: Barn Dance 

Squire Davis at Moseley's — 8:00 P.M. 

Friday, June 9: Senior Night at the Boston Pops 

Symphony Hall — 8:30 P.M. 

Saturday, June 10: Class Night - 7:30 p. m. 

McHugh Forum — Class Dance 

Sunday, June 11: Baccalaureate - 11 a. m* 
Monday, June 12: Commencement - 10 a. nn 

Commencement Ball 

The Surf — Nantasket 

Buddy Morrow and His Orchestra 
Dancing 9 P.M. -1:00 A. M. 



362 



PATRONS 



Richard Cardinal Gushing 

Most Rev. Eric F. MacKenzie, D.D. 

Most Rev. Jeremiah F. Minihan, D.D. 

Very Rev. Michael P. Walsh, S.J. 

Rev. Charles M. Crowley, S.J. 

Rev. Joseph A. Devenny, S.J. 

Rev. Robert F. Drinan, S.J. 

Rev. John V. Driscoll, S.J. 

Rev. Charles F. Donovan, S.J. 

Rev. W. Seavey Joyce, S.J. 

Rev. John A. McCarthy, S.J. 

Rev. John P. Rock, S.J. 

Vincent P. Wright 

Rita P. Kelleher 



Dr. John R. Betts 
Mr. Thomas J. Cudmore 
Prof. Paul Devlin 
Prof. Paul G. Foucre' 
Prof. Margaret E. Griffin 
Prof. John F. Norton 
Maj. John J. Rock 
Prof. James E. Shaw 
Miss Elizabeth A. Strain 
Dr. Lewis A. M. Sumberg 
Prof. Leon M. Vincent 
Lt. Col. John C. Wood, Jr. 



Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Abbate 

Mr. Vincent J. Agostino 

Mr. William J. A'Hearn 

Mr. & Mrs. George P. Allendorf 

Atty. & Mrs. Salvatore E. Aloisi 

Mr. Louis Altieri 

Mr. John Amabile, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter J. Amirault 

Mr. & Mrs. S. Osten Anderson 

Mr. & Mrs. Winfield C. Anderson 

Mr. John L. Arnold 

Mr. P. B. Atkinson, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Barbaris 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond E. Barden 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward F. Bell 

Mr. & Mrs. R. E. Berube 

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth A. Bishop 

Mr. & Mrs. Aldo F. Bonazzoli 

Dr. & Mrs. Walter S. Booth 

Mr. & Mrs. Arthur J. Bourque 

Mr. Walter L. Bowes 

Mr. Maurice J. Boyle 



Mr. & Mrs. Anthony T. Brawley 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph C. Breen, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Edmund J. Buckley 

Dr. & Mrs. Francis C. Buckley 

Mr. T. J. Buckley, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. John L. Burke 

Mr. & Mrs. Edwin F. Butters 

Mr. Thomas P. Byrne 

Mr. & Mrs. Mitchell J. Camer 

Mr. & Mrs. Martin C. Canavan 

Mr. & Mrs. John A. Cannon 

Mr. Wilbrod Cantin 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael F. Caputo 

Mr. & Mrs. George H. Carey 

Mr. & Mrs. Alfred Carolonza, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Caruso 

Mr. & Mrs. James P. Cavanaugh 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony L. Celata 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert J. Champigny 

Mr. & Mrs. John Chiminiello 

Dr. & Mrs. John T. Cinella 

Mr. William J. Coan 

Mr. & Mrs. Sidney Cohen 

Mr. Leonard Colavecchio 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward W. Colbert 

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen E. Cole 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles D. Collins 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Frank Collins 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony J. Conde 

Mr. & Mrs. Patrick Conroy 

Mr. & Mrs. T. Frank Copp 

Mr. Raymond F. Costello 

Mr. & Mrs. Herbert H. Coughlan 

Mr. Howard G. Cummings 

Mr. & Mrs. William F. Cummings 

Mr. Anthony J. Cunis 

Mr. & Mrs. C. Carroll Cunningham 

Mrs. William J. Cronin 

Mr. & Mrs. Crowley 

Mr. & Mrs. James J. Crowley 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph L. Curtin 

Mr. Stanley Czarnecki 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles D'Agostino 

Mrs. Rose B. Dahoney 

Mr. Romeo A. Daigneault 

Mr. & Mrs. Daley 

Mrs. Mary Daley 

Mr. & Mrs. Dennis F. Dalton 

Mr. Norman P. Davis 

Mr. & Mrs. John R. Davitt 

Mr. & Mrs. Alfred DelColle 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward A. Densmore 



363 



PATRONS 



Dr. Glen F. Denys 

Mr. Thomas Deveney 

Mr. & Mrs. Giovanni Devita 

Mr. & Mrs. Leo G. Devlin 

Mr. & Mrs. Owen W. Devlin 

Mr. & Mrs. Edmund D. Dickson 

Mr. Ralph Dilanni 

Mrs. Elizabeth T. Dillon 

Mr. & Mrs. Angelo DiMario 

Mr. & Mrs. Philip J. Doherty 

Dr. Ralph F. Dolan 

Mr. & Mrs. M. H. Donahue 

Mrs. Charles J. Donnellan 

Mr. John O. Donovan 

Dr. F. J. Downey 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert E. Duffy 

Mr. S. Francis Duffy 

Mr. & Mrs. A. Druzdis 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Earley 

Mr. & Mrs. L. O. Eisenhauer 

Mr. Louis Fabian 

Mr. & Mrs. Leo T. Falvey 

Mr. & Mrs. Patsy Famiglietti 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas F. Farrell 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Fiorentino 

Mr. & Mrs. E. V. Fish 

Mr. & Mrs. Angelo Fisichella 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul H. Fitzgerald 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard H. Fitzpatrick 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank T. Flynn 

Mr. & Mrs. Cornelius J. Foley 

Mr. & Mrs. Gerald S. Foley 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Forry 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas P. Forry 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Gabis 

Mr. & Mrs. A. John Gada 

Mr. & Mrs. Leandro S. Galban 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles D. Gallivan 

Mr. George J. Garner 

Lillian M. Geis 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter J. Giere 

Mr. & Mrs. Roland W. Golden 

Dr. Arthur J. Gorman 

Mr. & Mrs. Stanley J. Grabowski 

Mr. & Mrs. George Vincent Grace 

Mr. & Mrs. Greco 

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Gregory 

Dr. & Mrs. S. G. Hajjar 

Dr. & Mrs. A. M. Hall 

Mr. & Mrs. James F. Hall 

Mr. & Mrs. Louis H. Hamel 

Mr. & Mrs. Nicholas C. Hannon 



Catherine Harrigan 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph R. Harrington 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward D. Hart 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Elwood Hart 

Mr. & Mrs. Ernest W. Hatch 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Hayes 

Mr. & Mrs. John D. Healy 

Mr. Thomas C. Heffernan 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Hehir 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter F. Henneberry 

Mr. & Mrs. John H. Hester 

Mr. & Mrs. John E. Higgins 

Mr. John T. Higgins 

Mr. Michael J. Higgins 

Dr. & Mrs. Paul R. Hinchey 

Mr. & Mrs. Cornelius J. Holland 

Katherine Quinlan Horton 

Mr. & Mrs. Owen P. Hughes 

Mr. Francis J. Hunt 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert J. Hurd 

Mr. & Mrs. Allen Hurley 

Mr. & Mrs. Gerald T. Hynes 

Mr. & Mrs. Neil D. Jensen 

Mr. Alfred Johnson 

Mr. & Mrs. Harold F. Johnston 

Mr. & Mrs. John E. Johnston 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis V. Jones 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis J. Jordan 

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Joyce 

Mr. & Mrs. Vito Judicini 

Mr. Edward R. Karazin 

Mr. & Mrs. Bruno Kazmierczak 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis A. Keenan 

Mr. & Mrs. Brendan A. Kelly 

Mr. & Mrs. Clement C. Kelly 

Mr. & Mrs. Martin J. Kelly 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard J. Kelly 

Mr. Francis W. Kennedy 

Mr. & Mrs. Leo J. Kennedy 

Mr. & Mrs. James E. Kenney 

Mr. Daniel J. Kerr, Jr. 

Mr. Paul P. Kicin 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis P. Kilbane 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas H. Kilcoyne 

Mr. Charles J. Kiley 

Mr. & Mrs. Herbert J. King 

Mr. Joseph M. King 

Mr. & Mrs. Warren T. Kingsbury 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Kulig 

Mr. & Mrs. Andrew Kuzma 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony V. Labesky 

Margaret Lally 



364 



PATRONS 



Mr. & Mrs. Howard J. Landers 

Mr. & Mrs. James G. Lane 

Mr. & Mrs. John E. Lane 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Lane 

Mr. & Mrs. George S. Lawton 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry Latorella 

Mr. & Mrs. Rudolph LeClair 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony L. Leeber 

Mrs. Robert Leigh 

Dr. & Mrs. Adrian J. Levesque 

Mr. & Mrs. John C. Lewis 

Mr. Frank Lifrieri 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Lizotte 

Mrs. John J. Lonergan 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward B. Lynch 

Mr. & Mrs. James W. Lynch 

Dr. John B. Lynch 

Mr. John A. Lynch 

Mr. Hugh A. MacDonald 

Mr. & Mrs. James MacKenzie, Sr. 

Mrs. Marie A. Mackey 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank J. Macolini 

Mr. Joseph J. Magri 

Mr. Henry E. Maguire 

Mrs. Lillianna Mailloux 

Mr. & Mrs. Frederic J. Manning 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael F. Martin 

Mr. William J. Martin 

Mr. & Mrs. William T. Martowski 

Mr. & Mrs. John Masotta 

Miss Virginia D. Maywalt 

Dr. Allan J. McCarthy 

Mr. Francis T. McCauley 

Mr. & Mrs. John A. McCormack 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank V. McDermott 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. McDonough 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. McHale 

Mr. Vincent J. McKeever 

Col. Frank McLaughlin 

Mr. & Mrs. John A. McMahon 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward J. Murphy 

Mr. John J. McNamara 

Mr. Edward J. McNiff 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward McPartlin 

Mr. Arthur G. Melville, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank D. Micciantuano 

Mr. Nicholas J. Micelotta 

Mr. & Mrs. Harry Milano 

Mrs. Mary E. Miles 

Mr. John D. Miller 

Mr. & Mrs. Cosmo E. Mingolla 

Mr. & Mrs. John G. Molloy 



Mr. Alphonse Montillo 

Mrs. John W. Moore 

Mr. & Mrs. Ernest C. Morency 

Mr. Peter J. Morgan 

Mr. Frank Mucinskas 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Mulkerin, Jr. 

Mrs. Edward T. Mulkern 

Mr. William G. Chaunce Mullen 

Mr. & Mrs. William Murphy 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond M. Murray 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Murray 

Mrs. Mary A. Neary 

Mr. Timothy H. Nelligan 

Mr. & Mrs. John Niemiec 

Mr. & Mrs. Neil A. Nolan 

Dr. W. J. Noon, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Norton 

Dr. Richard S. Nugent 

Mr. Charles W. O'Brien 

Mr. Everett J. O'Brien 

Mr. & Mrs. Daniel F. O'Connor 

Mr. John R. O'Connor 

Mr. & Mrs. James M. O'Keefe 

Mr. & Mrs. A. V. O'Malley 

Mr. & Mrs. Otto A. Payonzeck 

Mr. & Mrs. George P. Pelley 

Mrs. George Perreault 

Mr. & Mrs. C. C. Pezzella 

Mrs. Pauline Piscal 

Mr. & Mrs. George Pope 

Mr. Bernard Power 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward J. Powers 

Mr. & Mrs. B. J. Preskenis 

Mr. & Mrs. John D. Provasoli 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry F. Quill 

Mrs. Pierce F. Quinlan 

Mr. Joseph V. Quirk 

Mr. Richard T. Reale, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Hector Reichard 

Mr. Richard Reilly 

Mrs. Catherine Ricupero 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas D. Robinson 

Mr. William H. Robinson, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank J. Robotti 

Mrs. Eva F. Rogers 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Romano 

Mr. & Mrs. Patrick J. Rooney 

Mr. Albert J. Rossi 

Mr. & Mrs. Frederick J. Roth 

Mr. & Mrs. M. J. Rouse 

Mr. & Mrs. Leo F. Russell 

Mr. Stephen M. Russo 



365 



PATRONS 



Mr. Frederick S. Ryan, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. John M. Ryan 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond E. Ryan 

Mr. & Mrs. Patrick Sabatino 

Mrs. Martin Scales 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael M. Scalzi 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward S. Scullane 

Mr. & Mrs. Elvin Semrad 

Mr. Edward J. Sheehan 

Mr. J. Frank Sheehan 

Mrs. Charles Simon 

Mr. & Mrs. A. Shields 

Mr. William D. Slattery 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Snow 

Mr. & Mrs. Alcide Soucy 

Mr. Raymond Spinosa 

Mr. & Mrs. John W. Sten 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles W. Stewart 

Mr. Philip St. Germain 

Mr. & Mrs. John St. Paul 

Mr. Frank Straub 

Mrs. Patrick S. Sudbay 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert L. Sullivan 

Mr. Benjamin R. Sullivan 

Mr. Joseph E. Sullivan 

Mr. Robert W. Sullivan 



Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Sullivan 

Mr. William F. Sullivan 

Mr. & Mrs. John M. Sutton 

Mr. & Mrs. Arthur S. Taylor 

Mr. Charles A. Tiernan 

Mr. & Mrs. George F. Titterton 

Mr. & Mrs. Stanley M. Towle 

Mr. & Mrs. Salvatore Trapani 

Mrs. William P. Trayers 

Mr. Alfred R. Triano 

Mr. R. Velazco Troconis 

Mrs. Lauro J. Turbini 

Mrs. Florence Urban 

Mr. & Mrs. J. H. Vacca 

Mr. Frank Valzania 

Mr. & Mrs. Vasco A. Villela 

Mrs. Alfred C. Wasilauskas 

Mr. & Mrs. Ralph E. Wedgeworth 

Dr. Robert F. Welsh 

Mr. & Mrs. Timothy A. Whelan 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles H. White 

Mr. Walter N. Willett 

Mr. Charles F. Wilson 

Mr. Paul A. Zazzaro 

Mr. & Mrs. E. L. Zobel 

Mr. & Mrs. Elmer C. Zirkel 



366 



Compliments of 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

STUDENT SENATE 



Compliments of 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

STUDENT SENATE 



Compliments of 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

STUDENT SENATE 



367 





oO eauiiful c/t a t r 

R E C 



K 



AVAILABLE 



4 ounces 60 jf 
WHEREVER 



THERE ARE THREE BRECK SHAMPOOS 
FOR THREE DIFFERENT HAIR CONDITIONS 
Every woman is different. One of these differences is in the 
appearance of her hair. To keep your hair looking its best 
use a shampoo for your own individual hair condition. One 
Breck Shampoo is for dry hair. Another Breck Shampoo is 
for oily hair. A third Breck Shampoo is for normal hair. 
A Breck Shampoo helps keep your hair soft and shining. 

New packages marked with color help you select the correct Breck Shampoo. 
Red for dry hair Yellow for oily hair Blue for normal hair 

COSMETICS ARE SOLD - iy 2 oz. 39(i 4 oz. 60^ 8 oz. $1.00 16 oz. $1.75 



368 



ySewa&ze-M fa z/&nA 



Contractors and Engineers 

WASHINGTON STREET HUDSON, MASSACHUSETTS 

JO 2-2542 . . . HU 5-0333 

Constructors of Bridges, Highways, Water and Sewers, Railroads 
Riggers, Builders 



5Q\ 



***S OF Tb^'° 

1907 1957 



"WITH BEST WISHES" 

JOHN J. LONERGAN INSURANCE AGENCY 

Established 1918 

Insurance of every description 

141 MILK STREET BOSTON 9, MASS. 

Telephone Liberty 2-7460 

• 

21 TRAINCROFT ROAD, MEDFORD 55, MASS. 
Telephone EXport 6-7269 



369 





STadium 2-0240 Sanders Rented 


BEST WISHES 


HOME SUPPLY CO. 


to the 


ELI SOKOLOVE 


CLASS OF 1961 


HARDWARE - PAINTS - WALLPAPER 
LINOLEUMS 


• 


366 Washington Street Brighton, Mass. 


SULLIVAN BROS. 


WM. J. COX FUNERAL HOME 

* 


PRINTERS 


JOHN J. GREENE — '31 




Licensed Funeral Director 


LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS 


* 

431 TRAPELO ROAD BELMONT, MASS. 




IV 4-0133 


ALVORD PHARMACY, INC. 




CARL H. and JOHN C. ALVORD 
Reg. Pharmacists 


Howland Linen Supply Co. 


PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 


INCORPORATED 


105 Union Street Newton Centre, Mass. 


40 BRISTOL STREET 


Phone BIgelow 4-0760 


BOSTON 18, MASS. 


Formerly 


Hancock 6-6630 


HAHN DRUG STORE, Inc. 


73 CHANCERY STREET 






NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 


_^ yfeAt *Ave*\Lije, 


Tel. Wyman 2-4981 


ttq&mZzESk* 


CLEANING AND PRESSING 
DONE ON PREMISES 


CORNER RT. No. 28 and BEARSE'S WAY 
HYANNIS, MASS. 


• 
546 West Avenue Norwalk, Conn. 


Tel. Spring 5-2245 



370 



BEST WISHES 
o) 

V. P. ROBERTS & CO. 



ALPHA KAPPA PSI 

'First Professional Business Fraternity at Boston College' 

extends 

CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES 

to the 

CLASS OF 1961 



Congratulations to the Class of '61 

THE NEW YORK CLUB OF BOSTON COLLEGE 

Moderator — REV. GEORGE LAWLOR, S.J. 

Gerald E. Aneskewich President Thomas E. Farrell Treasurer 

William W. Kingsbury III Vice-President Peter Viall Sergeant-at-Arms 

Pamela Prime Secretary J. Barry Grimm Sergeant-at-Arms 



371 



COURTEOUS • DEPENDABLE 




TAXICAB SERVICE 






PARTIES ARE MORE FUN 


BOSTON CAB 






AT 




-^' / <- 


NANTASKET 






//^^^>i% /^^^^^^TC\. 


^■rnyJL 


^^wA 




KEnmore 6-5010 


M. J. FLAHERTY COMPANY 


Compliments of 


MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS 

♦ 


NOVAK'S 


29 WAREHAM ST. BOSTON 18, MASS. 


Towne Terrace 


Telephone HUbbard 2-4920 




Victor J. Galleni, Pres. Frederick J. Casey, Treas. 


1700 BEACON STREET 


Heating - Ventilating - Air Conditioning 


BROOKLINE, MASS. 


Power and Process Piping - Cooling Systems 




Oil Burners 


• 


♦ 




Member of 


Luncheons — Dinners 


Mechanical Contractors Association of America, Inc. 




National Certified Pipe Welding Bureau 


Banquets 



372 




Exclusive Metropolitan Boston Agent: 
AERO MAYFLOWER TRANSIT COMPANY, INC. 

World-wide Service 

• 

3175 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 30, MASS. 

• 

HAncock 6-8000 JAmaica 2-3300 CAnton 6-2860 

OLympic 3-0400 Pioneer 4-1820 



Compliments of 

E F P BURNS <NC 

Formal Clothes for Rental 

(par excellence) 

• 

100 SUMMER STREET 

Phones: LI 2-3572 and DE 8-8033 

* 
PAUL E. P. BURNS, B.C. 1953 



373 



WESTON NURSERIES, INC. 

* 

Growers of New England's finest nursery stock. Over 300 

acres under cultivation. Our Garden Center is supplied 

with plants grown in our nursery plus a full selection of 

lawn and garden needs. 

ROUTE 135 Tel. Hopkinton ID 5-3414 
HOPKINTON, MASS. Wellesley CE 5-3431 


M. B. FOSTER 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 

• 

368 CONGRESS STREET 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 


JOHN F. CLUNAN 
New York Life Insurance Co. 

Specializing in Estate Planning and Life Insurance 

Bus.: HUbbard 2-4900 
Res.: NOrmandy 5-3314 

75 FEDERAL STREET BOSTON, MASS. 
3 HUNNEWELL ST. MELROSE, MASS. 


LAKE STREET BOOK STORE 

♦ 

2193 COMMONWEALTH AVENUE 
BRIGHTON 35, MASSACHUSETTS 


REARDON and TURNER 

150 CAUSEWAY STREET 
BOSTON 14, MASSACHUSETTS 

• 

REGISTERED 

PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS 
BUILDING SERVICES 


BEST WISHES TO 

THE 
CLASS OF 1961 

CARDULLO CATERERS 



374 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF THE 



PHILOMATHEIA 
CLUB 



Women's Auxiliary 

of 

Boston College 



MRS. V. P. ROBERTS 

President 

REV. JOHN J. MURPHY, S.J. 

Spiritual Director and Treasurer 



375 



SERVICE UNIFORM 




COMPANY, Inc. 


BEST OF LUCK 


1 5 SCHOOL STREET BOSTON, MASS. 


to the 


CApitol 7-0670 







CLASS OF 1961 


Outfitters of Boston College 
R.O.T.C. 


from the 

GOLD KEY SOCIETY 


ATTENTION GRADUATING SENIORS: 


See Us for Your Uniform Needs 
and Accessories on 


"SERVICE and SACRIFICE" 


Going Into Active Service 




COMPLIMENTS 


from 


A JOHN GADA 


General Contracting 

• 


FISHERS ISLAND, NEW YORK 



376 



RENTALS — TYPEWRITERS 




Standard or Electric . . . Free Delivery 




Always Call 


BEST OF LUCK 


PETER PAUL 




OFFICE EQUIPMENT CO., INC. 


TO THE CLASS OF 1961 


11 PINE ST., WALTHAM TW 3-8920 




CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 
CLASS OF '61 


The Campus Council 


VARSITY GRILLE 




2197 COMMONWEALTH AVENUE 




CHESTNUT HILL, MASS. 




SULLIVAN D. C. & CO., INC. 


RUBY NEWMAN ORCHESTRAS 

400 COMMONWEALTH AVENUE 


Specialists In 


BOSTON, MASS. 
Bill Crosby Ruby Newman 


INDUSTRIAL SECURITY 

UNDERCOVER OPERATORS 




RAMBLER VOLVO 


• GUARDS • 


"Two Fine Economy Cars" 

GENE BROWN MOTORS, INC. 


24 HOUR SERVICE 


724 BEACON STREET 


1 11 PEMBERTON SQ. CApitol 7-0349 


NEWTON CENTRE, MASSACHUSETTS 




Gene Brown DEcatur 2-0800-0801 



377 



Compliments 

A FRIEND 



378 



BOSTON COLLEGE 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

CHESTNUT HILL 67 
MASSACHUSETTS 



To The Boston College 
CLASS OF '61 

Our Very Best Wishes 
Now and for the Future 



The Sheraton- Plaza 



BOSTON 

H. de F. "Dan" Nyboe 
General Manager 



Boston's 
Distinctive Store 




JOHN A. VOLPE 
CONSTRUCTION COMPANY 



Famous for 
Good Foods and Delicacies 

S. S. PIERCE CO. 

Stores in Boston, Belmont, Wellesley, Northshore, 

Brookline and Newton 

Mail and Telephone Orders 



Washington 



MALDEN 



Miami 



TIMPANY ELEVATOR CO. 

SERVICE • PARTS 

MAINTENANCE 



Han 6-9277 



Boston 



THE MARSHARD ORCHESTRAS 

The Outstanding Favorite of 
America's Universities ' 

73 NEWBURY ST. BOSTON 

KEnmore 6-5173 
NEW YORK BAR HARBOR 



379 







Letterpress • Offset • Thermography 


SOCIETY FOR 


• 


ADVANCEMENT 


COMPLETE 


OF MANAGEMENT 


PRINTING SERVICE 




• 


Bill Sharkey, President 


59 McBride Street Jamaica Plain 




JAmaica 4-0204 






BOSTON CHAIN LINK 


ELBERY MOTOR CO., INC. 


FENCE CO. 


Ford - Falcon - Thunderbird 


350 ADAMS STREET 


Sales and Service 


DORCHESTER, MASS. 
o 


GUARANTEED USED CARS 


Expert Erectors 

o 


+ 


Tennis Courts — Backstops 


KI-7-3820 
360 CAMBRIDGE STREET CAMBRIDGE 


Fences of All Types 


Open Evenings 


TA 5-1 800 GE 6-6680 GE 6-6681 




WILLIAM A. ENGLISH '49 




Sales Manager 



380 



Compliments of 

THE CLASS OF 1962 



Compliments of 

THE CLASS OF 1963 



Compliments of 

THE CLASS OF 1964 



381 



TRAVEL Is Our Business (Not a Sideline) 

Whatever Your Needs You Deserve The Best 

Let Our Travel Experience Be Your Guarantee 

of Personal Satisfaction 

AIR — STEAMSHIP — HOTEL 

Tour and Cruise Reservations the World Over 

BASSETT 
TOUR & TRAVEL BUREAU 

24 MAIN ST. HAVERHILL, MASS. 

DR 4-6301 

World-Wide Travel Specialists Since 1895 



Compliments of 

BOSTON FUEL TRANSPORT INC. 

♦ 

36 NEW STREET 

EAST BOSTON 28, MASSACHUSETTS 



CONTRACT SALES, INC. 

Fred W. Fogg, Pres. 

Office and Institutional Furniture 

713 BEACON ST. BOSTON 15, MASS. 

KEnmore 6-1515 



KELLY'S 
PRESCRIPTION DRUG STORE 

389 WASHINGTON STREET 
BRIGHTON CENTRE 



E. T. RYAN IRON WORKS, INC. 

20 BRAINTREE STREET 
ALLSTON 34, MASS. 

Ornamental Iron Aluminum and Bronze 

E. T. Ryan, Pres. 1910 



. . . from 

THE DORMITORY COUNCIL 

. . . to 
THE CLASS OF 1961 

CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES 

+ 

John B. O'Donnell President 

John G. Sayers Vice President 

John F. Lenoci Secretary 

James B. Curry, Jr. . . - . . . Treasurer 
Rev. John Caulfield Moderator 



382 



Established 1902 — Incorporated 1911 

GEORGE F; DRISCOLL COMPANY 

General Contractors • Building Construction 

41 EAST 42nd STREET NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 

MUrray Hill 7-4200 



— Builders of — 

MARTYRS' COURT FORDHAM UNIVERSITY 

LOYOLA HALL FORDHAM UNIVERSITY 

PHARMACY-SCIENCE BUILDING ST. JOHN'S UNIVERSITY 

SCIENCE BUILDING MANHATTAN COLLEGE 

GYMNASIUM CRANWELL PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



CHARLES F. MURPHY, INC 

24 SCHOOL STREET 
BOSTON 8, MASSACHUSETTS 

INSURANCE 

LA 3-2076 



CHARLES F. MURPHY, '30 

President 



CHARLES F. MURPHY, '55 
Vice-President 



383 



FRANCIS H. CURTIN 
INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 

Insurance and Bonds 

689 CONCORD AVE. CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 
Telephone University 4-4780 



Congratulations to 
THE CLASS OF 1961 

See you at the "OG" 
where you're only a stranger once 

OXFORD GRILLE 

Fine Foods and Imported Liquors 

36 CHURCH ST. HARVARD SQUARE 

CAMBRIDGE 38, MASS. 



Best Wishes from 



TEDESCHI'S SUPER MARKETS 

Famous for the Finest! 



FINEST MEAT SOLD ANYWHERE 



BRAINTREE 
HULL 

HANOVER 
BROCKTON 
ROCKLAND 
PLYMOUTH - KINGSTON 



Compliments of 



COCA-COLA 

BOTTLING COMPANY 

OF BOSTON 



EDMAND'S COFFEE CO. 

68 INDIA STREET 
BOSTON 10, MASS. 



384 



Compliments of 

STUDENT FACULTY ORGANIZATION 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Congratulations to the Class of 1961 

THE ROD AND GUN CLUB 

of 

BOSTON COLLEGE 

DEDICATED TO GOOD SPORTSMANSHIP AND 
WILDLIFE CONSERVATION 



Compliments of 



THE INTERNATIONAL FRATERNITY OF 



DELTA SIGMA PI 



A Professional Fraternity in the Field of Commerce and Business Administration 



385 



COMPLIMENTS 


OF 


A FRIEND 




H. C. WMIJsTWRIGHT % CO. 




Established 1868 


Liberty 2-5252 


Members j 
Boston and New York Stock Exchanges 


ryfaurice ^r. ^rroran L^o. 


• 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 




60 State Street 120 Broadway 


DRAPERIES 


Boston New York 




54 Franklin Street Casco Bank Building 




Framingham, Mass. Portland, Maine 


85 ESSEX STREET BOSTON 11, MASS. 


Northshore Shopping Center Amoskeag Bank Building 
Peabody, Mass. Manchester, N. H. 




804 Main Street 7 Main Street 




Fitchburg, Mass. Keene, N. H. 




Hospital Trust Building 
Providence, R. I. 



386 





ANDREW T. JOHNSON CO., INC. 


REPOINTING AND WATERPROOFING 




LEAKING MASONRY WALLS ABOVE GROUND 


^j 3 J 15 TREMONT PLACE 
J IN J 103 NEWBURY STREET 




• 


LOCATIONS BOSTON ( 173 MILK STREET 


CONCRETE RESTORATION 


/TfUtMMCUty 


MASONRY RESTORATION 


NEW ENGLAND'S NEWEST AND LARGEST 


BUILDING CLEANING 


COMPLETE PLANT UNDER ONE ROOF IN 
BURLINGTON, MASS. ON MIDDLESEX TURNPIKE 


BIRDPROOFING 


(AT EXIT 35 OFF RT. 128) 


IA/ESTERN 

S Waterproofing co., inc. 


TEL. BR 2-3070 


REPRODUCTIONS OF ALL TYPES 

• BLUEPRINTING 
• PHOTOSTATS 




• OFFSET PRINTING 





• WHITE PRINTING 




• DRAWING MATERIALS 


j BOSTON 18 NEW YORK 17 


• MICROFILMING 

• MINIATURIZATION 


ALBANY 2 


• CAMERA ENLARGEMENTS 

(UP TO 60 « 120' IN ONE PIECE) 




Richmond 2-I6I0 - CONNECTING ALL PLANTS l 


Compliments of 


BAYER & MINGOLLA 


FRANK A. FOWLER 


CONSTRUCTION COMPANY 


, "THE COLLEGE RING MAN" 


INC. 


Prom Favors a Specialty 


P. O. BOX 991 WORCESTER, MASS. 




♦ 


Subsidiaries 


I 27 SCHOOL ST. 


ASPHALT PAVEMENT CORP. 


BOSTON 8, MASS. 


Springfield, Mass. 


Richmond 2-0161 


B & M ASPHALT CORP. 
Millbury, Mass. 




B & M CRUSHED STONE CORP. 


♦ 


Ashland, Mass. 




VERMONT PAVING CO., INC. 


Representing Herff-Jones Co. — Murchison Div. 


Rutland and Burlington, Vt. 



387 



Compliments of 



The 



Women's Recreation Association 



of the 



School of Education 



CADET 
OFFICERS' CLUB 

President 
JOHN E. GREENE 

Vice President 
JOHN J. LANE 

Treasurer 
JAMES F. RUSSELL 

Sec. - Cor. 
GERALD E. ANESKEWICH 

Sec. - Res. 
ROBERT H. WEBSTER 



(sDauakterd of S5L f-^aui 

A Pontifical Congregation meeting the needs and 
challenges of the 20th Century. 



Established in more than 20 Nations, the Daughters of 
St. Paul bring Christ's Doctrine to all people with the most 
modern means of Communication: Press, Motion Pictures, 
Radio and Television. 

Writers, artists, technicians and Social Workers are found 
in their ranks. 

At the Novitiate in Boston, Mass., the Sisters conduct 
a Juniorate for high school girls aspiring to be Daughters 
of St. Paul, and a House of Studies for the higher educa- 
tion of its members. 



Young girls, 14-23 years of age interested in this modern 
Apostolate are invited to write to: 

REV. MOTHER SUPERIOR 

50 St. Paul's Ave. Jam. Plain, Boston 30, Mass. 



Compliments of 

SURGEONS' AND PHYSICIANS' 
SUPPLY CO. 



BRADFORD HOTEL 

BOSTON • MASSACHUSETTS 

Headquarters for Functions of 
All Types and Sizes 
Boston's most extensive and complete 
function facilities. Healthfully air- 
conditioned for your added comfort. 

Home of BRADFORD ROOF 

unusual night club-restaurant 

Dancing — Floor Shows 

it 

For further information, contact the 

Function Department, HAncock 6-1400 

Robert N. Appleton, Manager 



BEST WISHES 


Edward D. Hart Edward D. Hart, Jr., '61 


to the 


EDDIE HART SHOP 


CLASS OF 1961 


CHELMSFORD, MASSACHUSETTS 




Dial GLenview 4-0640 


* 




B. L. MAKEPEACE, INC. 


CURTIS FARMS 


Artists' Supplies — Engineers' Equipment 
Drafting Materials 


SUPERMARKETS 


KEUFFEL & ESSER — HAMILTON — WEBER 

Photostating — Offset Printing 




Blue Printing — Plan Reproductions 


QUINCY MILTON 


1266 Boylston Street Boston 15, Mass. 


WEYMOUTH 


COpley 7-2700 


Light Provided For Your Education 




by 


WALSH BROTHERS 


MASSACHUSETTS 


♦ 


GAS & ELECTRIC LIGHT 




SUPPLY CO. 


Contractors 


116 CANAL ST. 193 FRIEND ST. 


♦ 


BOSTON, MASS. 




+ 


150 HAMPSHIRE STREET 


Other Stores 


CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 


LYNN, NEW BEDFORD, WATERTOWN, 


TR 6-0375 


PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 





389 



HIGHAM, NEILSON, 
WHITRIDGE & REID, INC. 

50 CONGRESS STREET 
BOSTON 9, MASSACHUSETTS 



Designer and Administrator of 
YOUR STUDENT INSURANCE PROGRAM 

Serviced Locally by 
CHARLES F. MURPHY, INC. 

24 School Street 
Boston 9, Massachusetts 



DIAMOND UNION STAMP WORKS 

Plaques and Engraving 



81 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



PEPSI-COLA 



EDWARD S. QUIRK 
& COMPANY 

QUALITY TIRES 

QUALITY RECAPS 

QUALITY REPAIRS 



Emergency Service . . . 
Nights, Sundays and Holidays 

Tel. WA 4-8700 

275 ARSENAL 
WATERTOWN, MASS. 



Compliments 
of 

DeMAMBRO 
RADIO SUPPLY CO 

INCORPORATED 



390